Should the U.S. Make Changes to Daylight Saving Time?

Feeling tired today? It might be because you lost an hour of sleep this weekend. Every year on the second Sunday of March, daylight saving time turns back on. On the first Sunday of November, we will set our clocks backward and gain an hour of sleep as daylight saving time ends. The U.S. government originally established daylight saving time during World War I as a means to save energy by having longer days with more sunlight. However, there have been recent efforts to end daylight saving time or make daylight saving time a permanent, year-round state, in order to end the bi-yearly time changes.

Those who argue in favor of changing daylight saving time argue that the time changes are harmful to sleep schedules and circadian rhythms. This side argues it is especially detrimental to children and teenagers, who are more easily affected by small changes in their timetables. Additionally, those who favor making changes to the time system argue that the system was established over 100 years ago and should be updated.

Those who argue against changing daylight saving time claim that there are substantial benefits to having a system that gives humans more daylight during the spring and summer. This side argues that the bi-yearly time changes are a small price to pay for having more sunlight exposure during the evenings after work and school. Additionally, those who oppose changing daylight saving time argue that crime drops with the additional daylight between March and November.

So, what do you think? Should the U.S. make changes to daylight saving time? You can argue Yes, the U.S. should make changes; No, the U.S. should not make changes; or something in between!

Note: Ideal Think the Vote responses include the following:

-Address the question asked in a thoughtful and meaningful manner

-Use cited facts and constitutional arguments when appropriate to support their answers

-Are expressed in cohesive sentences and are free of distracting spelling, punctuation, and grammatical errors

-Address counter-arguments and opposing concerns in a respectful manner

-Are organized in a manner that flows logically and reads clearly

Current Standings:
Yes: 62%
No: 38%
  • Ashley from Kentucky

    Yes the U.S. should make changes to the current daylight saving time because it is not necessary in the world today. I understand that it was used in the past to save money and energy but this is no longer needed. There are many negative outcomes of this time change such as sleep deprivation especially for students since they lose an hour of sleep after already being sleep deprived, heart attacks, suicide, etc. Also in teh business world, this causes so much confusion and frustration with trying to schedule meetings in places where their time zones change often.

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    Yes the U.S. should make changes to the current daylight saving time because it is not necessary in the world today. I understand that it was used in …

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  • Ethan from Michigan

    The government should change the way that we do daylight saving time, in fact it there is no point in having daylight saving time. Daylight saving time this year lasts form March 8 to November 1st, and it allows the darkness to come later in the day. The reason why Daylight saving time came to light was a tactic to save energy in 1975, it was estimated that by jumping ahead the people who woke up earlier would use less energy as the sun would already be up. There are 2 main factors when look at why the government should stop using DST, the amount of headaches and troubles it causes to health, and the practically use in a modern society.

    Health is one of the major issues that surround DST, as the work day will continue only this time the workers and the people who have to commute will have one hour less of sleep. The Monday after DST starts is affectionately named, “sleepy Monday”. The name may be cute but it has some serious health concerns when regarding what it does to the human body. According to Austin C. Smith, from American Economic Journal, reported that there is a sharp spike in fatal car crashes by 6.5%. The root cause for this issue is because of the change in the circadian rhythms that our bodies relay on to tell us when to sleep and when not to. Take for example a toddler, they will have a circadian rhythms that might tell them to go to bed at 8. Yet, if we give the child an hour nap their circadian rhythm will reset and we thus have a child who is bouncing off the walls. Although a primitive example it allows us to see the strong effects that may occur. In addition, this lack of sleep will exists for at least a week as report by James Wyatt, PhD, Associate Professor at Rush University Medical Center, stated, “We’re encountering an increase in extra auto and workplace accidents on Monday or perhaps even carrying through the first week of the Spring time shift.” This can cause serious health concerns down the road as some people may not get used to the new sleep schedule and fall behind. This also results in the loss of productivity as workers are unable to focus and may develop other stress related illness which impede the work that they do.

    This was somewhat valid in, however with modernization and increased globalization it is no longer the case. Looking at globalization there is significant reason as to why it is no longer great for consumption. As more countries work together people are connected more regardless what time it is in the US, this mean that the energy usage is around the clock as the communications between countries doesn’t stop. One case happened in Indiana, where only 16% of all counties follow DST it was estimated that DST would save $7 million a year, yet it found to quite the opposite. During a 3 year period researchers from UCSB found that switching from Standard time to DST would cost due to the use of air conditioners early and later at night to cool down. The use of DST is simply negated by the overwhelming use of technology 24/7 due to the increasing globalization and taking away DST would save hassle and confusing with America’s most crucial trading partners.

    DST has no benefits when it comes to the overall view, the common myths are as followed. DST was invented by Farmers to have a decrease in fuel consumption, this is just a myth that has no fact. Farmers will get up regardless of the time not because they are accustomed to it but because they’re regime follows that. The crops they have and the chores they still have are not shortened and most of the livestock they have still follow the same schedule regardless of the time. Cost increases with the use of DST because of the amount of resources that is still being used especially in the summer months. This will result in an increase regardless of the time system used, but is worsened by the fact people have a harder time going to bed earlier and are up blasting A/C.

    When DST did come out it was great at reducing the amount of fuel that was consumed and initially saved a lot of money in the 1975s, however, now with the ever changing global structure there is no point in keeping DST as it has little to no effect on the present day system. It has meant a lot more losses than benefits including in health, productivity, and economic growth.

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    The government should change the way that we do daylight saving time, in fact it there is no point in having daylight saving time. Daylight saving tim…

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    • Zach from North Carolina

      DST was started in the 1910s to help conserve energy to be used for the war effort. You have a really good argument though.

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    • Ethan from North Carolina

      Hey! This is a phenomenally written essay! I love your constructive case, and I’d like to offer a few counters for consideration.

      I understand your concern surrounding health problems with DST. However, disruptions in circadian rhythms can be caused by staying up too late for a night, jetlag from a long trip, or travels to different time zones. I do not see how eliminating DST would solve for a universal problem that seems to be integral to human nature. We have to learn to adapt to change, as it is unavoidable. At the end of my essay under the “No” column, I provided a solution: extend DST to a yearlong program. This way, there would be no stark transition in sleep patterns or health practices. Would this approach solve for your concerns?

      I see a similar trend with your argument regarding energy concerns. It seems that most of your contention relies on the switch from standard time to DST. If we eliminated the switch, we wouldn’t see such a drastic increase in energy usage. Furthermore, with the course that industrialization and globalization have taken in the past few decades, increases in energy usage are inevitable. I say we harness the demand for eco-friendly solutions, and encourage companies to cut costs by implementing renewable energy sources over time. Eliminating DST won’t solve the overall issue, but allowing the free market to address the problem gradually offers a viable course of action. Let’s reap the benefits of DST on a yearly schedule, thus allowing the health concerns in your argument to be solved for, and encourage solutions to the problem of energy conservation on the scale that it warrants.

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      Hey! This is a phenomenally written essay! I love your constructive case, and I’d like to offer a few counters for consideration.

      I understand your…

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  • Maddie from Kentucky

    I think that the United States should update Daylights Saving Time not only because is it outdated but over time it has been correlated with loss of productivity and health problems, such as heart attacks and sleep deprivation. The U.S loses hundreds of millions of dollars each time we lose an hour in the spring. Also, research has indicated that there is a 5% increase in heart attacks on this day, the second Sunday in March. In order to combat this issue, I think the United States should shorten the number of months out of the year that we have daylight savings time. For example, only applying daylight savings time for the first three months of winter and the three months of summer.

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    I think that the United States should update Daylights Saving Time not only because is it outdated but over time it has been correlated with loss of p…

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    • Grace from Illinois

      I think it is a great idea to only apply DLS to the first 3 months of winter because to me it seems way to long without light. But, I like how in summer it’s still bright out at 9 p.m. I can also agree that there is a loss of productivity because sleeping in just an extra hour before school allows me to have greater concentration. You’re argument is very strong and I like the research you provided.

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      I think it is a great idea to only apply DLS to the first 3 months of winter because to me it seems way to long without light. But, I like how in summ…

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  • Sydney from Kentucky

    Daylight Saving Time has been around since World War I and I suppose they instituted it because of the benefits they thought it could have. The benefits include more light in the evening, lives would be saved, decrease in crime, more energy, improved sleep, etc (https:// http://www.cnn.com/2020/03/08/health/daylight-savings-good-for-you-conversation-wellness/index.html). However, as the years have passed, I believe these benefits have become inconsequential. According to wibw.com, daylight savings has caused an increase in the number of accidents. Now, wouldn’t this contrast the supposed benefit of saving lives? Another drawback of this would be that sleep schedules are messed up. I have personally experienced this and it takes a long time for me to get back on my certain sleep schedule. I would also like to bring up the point on how every country has different ways of using their time system which complicates knowing the time if you ever travel to another area. I believe that since there are so many more drawbacks than benefits to having daylight savings time, there definitely needs to be some changes.

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    Daylight Saving Time has been around since World War I and I suppose they instituted it because of the benefits they thought it could have. The benefi…

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  • Zach from Kentucky

    Daylight Savings Time does not have a true positive use other than giving people more sunlight in the summer and less sunlight in the winter. The rate of heart attacks and suicides is the highest on the day after the change in the spring. The lives lost because of this are not worth the supposed money that is saved on energy costs or the extra hour of sleep in the fall. Many other countries do not use Daylight Savings Time, and I don’t hear of many rushing to implement it because of its amazing benefits. I only hear of the debate on whether or not the US should eliminate it, and that answer is yes.

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    Daylight Savings Time does not have a true positive use other than giving people more sunlight in the summer and less sunlight in the winter. The rate…

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  • Alex from California

    Daylight Savings Time was invented in 1895 by a scientist from New Zealand who wanted more daylight during the summer. Back then, it made sense: in a society where electric lighting was not standard, changing our clocks forward in the spring and back in the fall made it possible for people and businesses to be more productive in the summer months. Especially in countries far from the equator (like New Zealand), this was beneficial in order to maintain daylight when night would be considerably longer than day otherwise. However, the US is in an age where electric lighting is standard, and darkness does not impede productivity as it did in the past. The week of “spring forward” has proven time and time again to be the least productive week for businesses because of the loss of an hour, not to mention the hassle of getting used to it being light outside an hour later every morning. Arizona and Hawaii, two states where more daylight in the summer equals more grueling heat, have already abandoned DST in favor of staying in the same time zone year round. In a society where darkness does not ruin productivity as it did in 1895 New Zealand, daylight savings time causes more problems than it attempts to create by causing a lack of productivity in the time surrounding the time change and general annoyance and confusion among citizens twice a year.

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    Daylight Savings Time was invented in 1895 by a scientist from New Zealand who wanted more daylight during the summer. Back then, it made sense: in a …

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  • Michelle from Indiana

    Yes, it’s time to do away with these time changes! They’re irrelevant today. You may change what time the sun comes up artificially by changing the clocks, but the sun is up for however long it will be. We can’t change that. Can the government come up with any viable reason for keeping the time change – other than it’s just what we’ve always done? Look at the consequences, especially in the Spring. Our bodies aren’t used to going to bed an hour earlier, so it takes time to adjust. Just 1 hour of a lack of sleep has some serious health consequences. Just to name a couple, our chances of developing heart disease and diabetes goes up (please see the attached for more info: https://qz.com/1225484/daylight-saving-time-how-losing-an-hour-of-sleep-hurts-your-health/). Because we’re driving in a groggier state, we’re more likely to get involved in car accidents for the week following “springing forward.” The harmful consequences outweigh any kind of small benefit to keeping DST. Finally, there are states or areas of states that don’t observe any time change. In order to keep all areas on the same page, it’s best that this is a nationwide practice rather than state-by-state. For example, I live in Northwest IN, near Chicago. We have always changed the times and stayed on Central Time. So it wouldn’t make sense for IN to decide alone to discontinue these time changes, which means that areas that are already on Eastern Time will be an hour ahead when the rest of the Eastern US “falls back,” then on Eastern time when they “spring forward” again. Just like it doesn’t make sense for the areas of IN on Central Time to suddenly be on Eastern Time, then back to Central Time. I HOPE the US discontinues this very outdated practice. Thank you!

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    Yes, it’s time to do away with these time changes! They’re irrelevant today. You may change what time the sun comes up artificially by changing the …

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  • Grace from Illinois

    I think that the United States should make changes to the day lights saving every March and November. This time change has lots of disadvantages to it. Personally the Illinois winters are the hardest for me because it begins to get dark at 3 pm, which is when I get out of school. This is very detrimental on my emotional health because not only is is cold out but I don’t see any sun from being inside all day. Also, I never get used to the new sleep schedule. Making me feel groggy during my first few hours of the day, leading to me spacing out in important classes. Overall, I think there should be a change because saving energy for money is not as important as health or education.

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    I think that the United States should make changes to the day lights saving every March and November. This time change has lots of disadvantages to it…

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  • Emma from Virginia

    I think the government should change daylight savings. I think they should change it because we all lose an hour of sleep. That messes up our sleep schedules and makes us more tired. It takes time to adjust to this which makes people more tired which then leads to people not being as focused which could affect school and work. One thing leads to another and grades may start dropping or other things. In conclusion that is why I think that we should change daylight savings.

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    I think the government should change daylight savings. I think they should change it because we all lose an hour of sleep. That messes up our sleep sc…

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  • Ivan from Texas

    Daylight savings time is a good concept, it gives us more daylight in our day so we use less power to light up the day. This makes it so we have less sunlight when we are sleeping in the morning and more in the afternoon when we are awake by moving the time back an hour and back ahead an hour. Some states like Hawaii and Arizona do not follow DST as they are close to the equator so the daylight doesn’t change that much, for people in those states it’s just a hassle. But does it actually come with some harm? First off DST happens overnight so you end up getting a different amount of sleep than you normally do. This messes with your sleep cycle. It also causes timing issues with places that don’t use DST. Overall DST has a few pros but the cons outway them.

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    Daylight savings time is a good concept, it gives us more daylight in our day so we use less power to light up the day. This makes it so we have less …

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  • Jack from North Carolina

    Daylight savings time (DST) is ultimately unimportant in today’s society. It includes adding one hour in the spring and losing one hour in the fall. It was initially established in Austria as an effort to reduce energy use in order to conserve fuel for electric power (http://www.webexhibits.org/daylightsaving/e.html). Currently, this is not needed because energy use doesn’t decrease in the dark like it used to. “When Indiana decided to introduce DST in 2006, a study found that the measure actually increased energy use in the state,” (https://www.timeanddate.com/time/dst/daylight-saving-debate.html). States like Arizona and Hawaii have already put a stop to daylight savings time and other states should follow suit as the original point of daylight savings is now irrelevant.

    I argue that daylight savings should be completely eliminated. Besides the obvious point that daylight savings time is unimportant, it’s also costing us money. “The City of New York invested 1.5 million US dollars in a dusk and darkness safety campaign for the DST change for the fall of 2016,” (https://www.timeanddate.com/time/dst/daylight-saving-debate.html). These costs are due to the rather sharp change in time and people’s inability to adjust. There is no reason to inconvenience people and spend money on DST when it could be avoided altogether.

    Though DST has its benefits in the fact that it provides people with more sunlight throughout the year, its harm outweighs the good. The increase in energy usage and increase in spending proves that its time to do away with DST. Not to mention the adverse health effects associated with DST. “The early evening darkness after the end of the DST period is linked to depression,” (https://www.timeanddate.com/time/dst/daylight-saving-debate.html). All of these factors combine to indicate DST is a failure and needs to be eliminated.

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    Daylight savings time (DST) is ultimately unimportant in today’s society. It includes adding one hour in the spring and losing one hour in the fall….

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  • Trevour from Texas

    I think that the United stated should change the DST because it decreases the health of people as studies have shown it leads to an incline of heart attacks by 10 percent. And it also gives us less sunlight throughout the day. Although there are many benefits to DST such as there was a 7 percent decrease in crime and savings from robberies up to 79 million dollars. But the negatives outweigh the positives, especially with traffic accidents. In fact, studies actually estimate that we could save about 366 more lives per year if we extended DST all year round. It is, very simply, easier to drive in daylight.

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    I think that the United stated should change the DST because it decreases the health of people as studies have shown it leads to an incline of heart a…

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  • Tia from Connecticut

    I think that losing an hour of sleep, is not healthy when people have to go to school and work the next day at an early hour.

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  • Erika from Texas

    On behalf of the resolution, the U.S. should make changes to daylight saving time. Daylight saving time affects the time by either increasing the amount of sleep that we get or bring it back an hour. Daylight saving time is also proven to affect health as it impacts cardiovascular performance and increases heart attacks, causes sleep deprivation, and insomniac strokes. This fluctuating time can also affect productivity levels in people. In the article, “Daylight Saving Time has long-term negative effects on health” Stephanie Price explains, “Over time, Daylight Saving Time eliminates bright morning light that critically synchronizes biological clocks, which can be associated with increased risk of heart attack and ischaemic stroke, as well as other negative effects of partial sleep deprivation.” It is tested and proven that the fluctuation in time can greatly affect the health of the people living in this area. In addition, the only countries that utilize daylight saving time are most of North America, Europe and parts of South America and New Zealand. The majority of countries in Africa, Asia, and South America don’t use daylight saving time. This difference in time can impact the unity of the world as it can impact trade. In continuation, the trade center of the world is rapidly changing to China, so not having the same time as them, can most likely affect the trade with them. Some arguments of those who negate the change in daylight saving time may argue that it increases the exposure to sunlight, but is the increase of sunlight that important that we would risk the health of the people for it? With the amendment of daylight saving time, we could be more united with the rest of the world and help the health of people all over the United States; therefore, the U.S. should make changes to daylight saving time.

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    On behalf of the resolution, the U.S. should make changes to daylight saving time. Daylight saving time affects the time by either increasing the amou…

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  • Naman from Texas

    Should the U.S. make changes to daylight saving time? Well, in my opinion I do believe it is time to change a system that was adopted around a hundred years ago. Daylight saving time was a means of conserving energy back when it was a necessity to keep every penny possible as World War 1 was a very costly war. Daylight saving time causes you to lose one hour of sleep during Spring, and to some individuals, that is an immense change. For example, many highschoolers and those who work on a very tight schedule have a hard time adjusting to the change. Also, two of the fifty states in the U.S. do not agree with the bi-yearly change, and have opted out of the system. Arizona and Hawaii do not have daylight saving time because they say that the states receive plenty of sunshine without changing hours. Also, when spring arrives, Arizona struggles with the extra hour of sunshine, as it is one of the hottest states in America, in return, this raises the payment a household gives on air conditioning. Many believe that the change is not a big deal, but according to Dr. Ann Beth Malow, “When we talk about DST and the relationship to light we are talking about profound impacts on the biological clock, which is a structure rooted in the brain. It impacts brain functions such as energy levels and alertness.” Our circadian rhythm is a biological clock that appropriately equips our body with the ability to have proper physical, emotional, and behavioral functions. When you lose that sleep after daylight saving time, your circadian rhythm is thrown off-balance, resulting in a lower immune system and an off-balance towards all aspects of your body. People argue that daylight saving time is beneficial as it provides your body with more sunlight. They also argue that some of the articles written over exaggerate the actual outcomes of the change. In terms of that, one shall have a hard time arguing against pure statistics. According to Health line, the number of increased car accidents after daylight saving time has increased 6-10 percent. Also, NBC news confirms that the loss of an hour of sleep raises the risk of heart attacks and possibly increases other cardiovascular diseases by 24 percent. For those reasons, I truly hope for a change in our bi-yearly time transition.

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    Should the U.S. make changes to daylight saving time? Well, in my opinion I do believe it is time to change a system that was adopted around a hundred…

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  • Zach from North Carolina

    With the original intention of Daylight Savings Time (DST) being to conserve energy during the War, the current practice of setting the clocks forward is out of date.
    Not only does the system result in an unnecessary shift in time, it has also been shown to increase the total number of heart attacks and car accidents. The loss of time, and of sleep, creates a jet lag feeling that can cause those who rely on schedules of sleep to have their circadian rhythms disrupted. This result can lead to those being less aware of their surroundings, making decisions that could be dangerous. It has been proven that during the day following DST, hospitals report a 24% increase in heart attacks victims, matched with a 6% spike in car accidents. Furthermore, there have been higher rates of miscarriages, strokes, and suicides following the switch. This is ridiculous and unnecessary, and could be solved easily by removing this outdated process. The disappearance of daylight has also led to higher rates of depression as well.
    To those that argue that the shift in time helps us to enjoy more time during the summer, and that it reduces the crime rate: firstly, this crime rate decrease is only for the first few days of DST, and it can be assumed that this is entirely because of the fact that the criminals are sleeping in because they’re just as tired as the rest of us are, and the extra time gained in the afternoons could stay the same. If we just left DST as it is, this shift would always allow for extra time in the Spring and Summer, rather than making this the foundation for the argument.
    Overall, the negative health effects following DST have shown that the most effective thing to do is to remove this process altogether. By ending the moving of clocks forward, we can prevent the backwards move in health.

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    With the original intention of Daylight Savings Time (DST) being to conserve energy during the War, the current practice of setting the clocks forward…

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  • Will from North Carolina

    The US should definitely make changes to Daylight Savings Time. Daylight Savings Time was a strategy that was first adopted in the US during World War 1 to conserve energy for the war effort. This practice was then reestablished during World War 2 for the same reason to conserve energy. Even though this practice may be useful during wartime to conserve energy, the US has not been involved in a large war for more than 50 years. Daylight Savings Time has been continued throughout the US, though, because of Nixon’s Uniform Time Act of 1966 in order to maximize the use of daylight and ultimately conserve energy. Today, most lights are very energy efficient compared to when the law was passed, so the energy saved in the extra hour of sunlight would be very minimal. Also, many people turn their lights on during the day, which counteracts the purpose of the law. In fact, according to a study that was performed by Matthew J. Kotchen and Laura E. Grant, two economic researchers, energy usage increased by 1% in Indiana after Daylight Savings Time because of increased energy used for heating and cooling.
    Along with the fact that Daylight Savings Time is ineffective in conserving energy, it is also damaging to circadian rhythms, especially in children. Circadian rhythms are essential for child development. With circadian rhythms disrupted, Daylight Savings Time has a negative effect on child development across the nation. The disruption of circadian rhythms also interferes with adults in that energy levels and alertness are decreased leading to a less efficient workplace and increased risk of heart attacks, strokes, and car accidents.
    Finally, even though the Uniform Time Act is a federal law, it allows for states to pass their own law regarding Daylight Savings Time. Two states have passed their own laws to avoid observing Daylight Savings Time – Arizona and Hawaii – with many states considering following their lead. Because the law isn’t observed completely across the US, there’s nothing stopping lawmakers from getting rid of Daylight Savings Time because it already is inconsistently used throughout the country.

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    The US should definitely make changes to Daylight Savings Time. Daylight Savings Time was a strategy that was first adopted in the US during World War…

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  • Emily from North Carolina

    In recent years, various studies have been published regarding the negative social and health effects of our nation’s two daylight saving “spring forward” and “fall back” time changes. In altering the schedule surrounding our bodies’ circadian rhythms, our annual time changes have led to increased risks of heart attacks, strokes, and depression. In order to keep the benefits provided by an extra hour of evening DST sunlight, but be rid of the bi-yearly time changes, I believe that the US should implement a permanent state of daylight savings year-round.

    According to the National Institute of Health, sunlight has the ability to boost our body’s vitamin D supply and increase our likelihood of exercising and socializing. In the Western World, we people are much more likely to be active in the evenings. Instituting DST permanently would allow us to take advantage of another precious hour of sunlight during a time that better suits our lives’ schedules all throughout the year.

    During DST, crime rates decrease dramatically. In 2015, the Brookings Institute found that following the March time shift, night-favoring crimes, such as robberies, muggings, and even rape decreased by 7%. DST has also proven to reduce car and traffic accidents. While the week following the “spring forward” date resulted in a 6% increase in car accidents, the extra hour of evening light given to drivers throughout the rest of the eight-month period has had a positive impact. According to a study done by Douglas Coate and Sara Markowitz of Rutgers University, we could actually save 336 more lives if DST was extended throughout the year.

    All in all, a year-round DST is the best of both worlds. We as people can continue enjoying evening light without having to readjust our circadian rhythms every year in March and November.

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    In recent years, various studies have been published regarding the negative social and health effects of our nation’s two daylight saving “spring …

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  • Sydney from Michigan

    As a high school student even the smallest change in my sleep schedule can affect me. Loosing an hour of sleep makes it difficult to focus in class the next day and even get the work done that is due. I all ready stay up late so many nights a week that loosing an hour and than having to adjust to it is time I really don’t have. So to answer the question, yes the government should change or even get ride of daylight saving time. While I understand that lots of people don’t like change, this is something that is necessary and will help the future generation of this great country.

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    As a high school student even the smallest change in my sleep schedule can affect me. Loosing an hour of sleep makes it difficult to focus in class th…

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  • Jesus from Texas

    I think daylight savings need changes, because the whole point was to save energy and have a more productive day in the evening.The only changes i think there should is restricting people from using electricity for example: if you want to use your stove internet and tv you can but u can only use three things at once. This rule will change at school but not at home this will last 7:00am till 9:00am. I think having an extra hour is great. You can do more stuff with that extra hour and i also think right now daylight savings is not a problem because people are stuck at home and businesses are closed and you don’t interact with people.

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    I think daylight savings need changes, because the whole point was to save energy and have a more productive day in the evening.The only changes i thi…

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  • Anjalee from North Carolina

    While I do love the feeling of waking up one November morning to see that we have gained an extra hour of sleep because of daylight savings time, I believe that this change ultimately has a greater negative effect on our circadian rhythms. According to the Nationwide Children’s Hospital, they state that teen students should receive 9 to 9.5 hours of sleep each night. When students learn about this recommended amount it seems like a joke considering most students actually receive 7 hours of sleep each night. The Nationwide Children’s Hospital also states that the main reason teenagers do not get enough sleep is because after puberty, there is an innate shift in a teens’ internal clock that sets them two hours ahead. In combination with a one hour shift back and forth twice a year, daylight savings time can be seen as a detrimental and outdated trend because less sleep can contribute to a greater risk of heart disease and obesity.

    While some may argue that daylight savings time allows students to have more sunlight hours to be outside playing sports or will reduce the number of car accidents, the unfavorable aspects of this shift may outweigh the benefits. Daylight savings time will promote being more productive because of extra daylight hours; however, in conjunction with the overuse of electronic devices, it is difficult to predict whether or not the extra hours of sunlight will promote a healthier sleep cycle. The claim that daylight savings time will reduce the number of car accidents can also be countered with the fact that with the change in sleep cycles for many young drivers will create reckless driving. Sleepier drivers, especially young ones, can create potential risks for other drivers on the road.

    Overall, abiding by a biannual change that was set in place during World War l seems counter-intuitive when there are many negative and harmful health effects that come with the change. Students should be focusing on achieving a full nine hours of sleep each night (which is already a struggle), and daylight savings time is doing little to help this growing problem.

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    While I do love the feeling of waking up one November morning to see that we have gained an extra hour of sleep because of daylight savings time, I be…

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  • Khamani from Georgia

    Daylight Savings Time can make people sick. Changing the time, even if it is only by 1 hour, disrupts our body clocks or circadian rhythm. For most people, the resulting tiredness is simply an inconvenience. For some, however, the time change can have more serious consequences.
    1. Studies link the lack of sleep at the start of daylight savings time to car accidents, workplace injuries, suicide, and miscarriages.
    2. The early evening darkness after the end of the daylight savings time is linked to depression.
    3. The risk of suffering a heart attack is also increased when daylight savings time begin. However, the extra hour of sleep we get at the end of daylight savings time has in turn been linked to fewer heart attacks.

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    Daylight Savings Time can make people sick. Changing the time, even if it is only by 1 hour, disrupts our body clocks or circadian rhythm. For most pe…

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  • Landon from North Carolina

    Daylight Saving Time began in the United States during World War I, but it was used inconsistently until the Uniform Time Act was implemented in 1966. Daylight Saving Time in the United States starts on the second Sunday of March and ends on the first Sunday of November. However in other places around the world, the implementation of Daylight Saving Time can vary, from countries that begin and end it on different days to those that do not even use it. Daylight Saving Time should be changed in the United States because it can disrupt sleeping patterns, which can lead to certain health risks, and it is unnecessary overall.

    Losing an hour of sleep can be hurtful to certain individuals. Everyone is affected when their sleep schedules are changed, and the effects are overwhelmingly negative. No one’s health benefits from losing sleep. Some adults are more negatively affected than others, and can be put at higher risk for a deadly heart attack or stroke. Others have sleep disorders or other issues that make it more difficult for them to adjust to Daylight Saving Time. These health risks seem like an unnecessary price to pay for having an extra hour of daylight.

    Daylight Saving Time is not necessary in the age of electricity. Light is easy to come by without the sun with electric lights lining the streets, in every building, and even over sports stadiums. Also, the use of Daylight Saving Time to get people to have another hour of daylight is not necessarily needed by everyone. Those who feel they need an extra hour can simply wake up earlier. Daylight Saving Time puts the United States out of sync with the rest of the world as there is no universal standard for the use of Daylight Saving Time. If all countries were to get rid of it there would be a universal time standard throughout the world. Thus Daylight Saving Time should not be observed in the United States.

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    Daylight Saving Time began in the United States during World War I, but it was used inconsistently until the Uniform Time Act was implemented in 1966….

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  • Anna from North Carolina

    During World War I, many nations across the world enacted Daylight Saving Time as a way to save energy and fuel. By springing forward or turning back, people got more sunlight out of their day which means that amenities like light bulbs had to be turned on for shorter periods of time causing less coal to be burned for electricity. During the height of the war, Daylight Savings helped with the rationing of coal used for things other than the war effort.

    While Daylight Savings time did a lot to help us ration and save in World War I and II, there is little use for the tradition in 2020 and it often causes more harm than good. For many Americans that one hour of lost sleep is a bigger deal than you might think. According to Victoria Stringer, who is a writer for the Victonian, after the week where we spring forward in March, “traffic accidents, workplace injuries, and emergency room visits… increase the Monday after the time change.” This is caused not just by the single hour of sleep on one day, but by the resetting of our circadian rhythms. Springing forward with Daylight Saving Time causes the sun to set later at night in relativity to the time our clocks show. Because our circadian rhythms run on how our eyes perceive sunlight, this change in sunset takes some getting used to, making the sleep loss caused by Daylight Savings time more than just one hour. This lack of sleep causes people to make mistakes that are potentially dangerous. Along with causing major and minor accidents, Stringer also says that Daylight Savings can exacerbate people’s mental illnesses.

    While I can certainly understand wanting to save power, even without a war effort, Daylight Saving Time is an outdated and somewhat harmful tradition which should be stopped. It serves no point and hurts people sometimes both mentally and physically. If people really want to save energy they should look into trying out sustainable practices, which will get us a lot further along with energy savings than Daylight Savings.

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    During World War I, many nations across the world enacted Daylight Saving Time as a way to save energy and fuel. By springing forward or turning back,…

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  • Kate from North Carolina

    I think the United States of america should make changes to and update Daylight Savings Time. Daylight Savings Time is done twice a year during seasonal changes and Americans set their clocks ahead by one hour, this was done to promote saving more energy during 1975. This was done assuming that people would then have to wake up earlier and not need to use their lights and be able to use the sun as their energy source rather than lights. However, implementing this in today’s world would no longer be useful and actually has bad effects on peoples’ health and a loss in money. Some people do not get lots of sleep at night, so when this day finally does circle around and happen there are many adverse effects from losing yet another hour of their sleep such as higher risk to heart attacks and the American Economic Journal states that there are 6.5% more fatal car crashes after the clock skips an hour. While many people are unaffected by this time change, there are others who say it is an easily stoppable health risk that will not affect the way people work and their energy as well as they will continue to make the same amount of money rather than losing it. This easily affects a persons’ circadian rhythms and has long term effects on children as well as young adults. Many children’s rate of growth could be stunted due to the disruption of their sleep schedule and stress them out. If the children are stressed out by the lack of an extra hour of sleep they may start doing poorly in classes at school. This could affect their long term goals in life, as well as young adults. While adults or elderly may not be disturbed by the lack of sleep, younger people need more sleep to grow until their brain is fully developed.

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    I think the United States of america should make changes to and update Daylight Savings Time. Daylight Savings Time is done twice a year during season…

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  • Murphy from North Carolina

    The United States should make changes to the current Daylight Savings Time (DST). DST includes gaining an hour in the spring, and losing an hour in the fall. While there are several benefits of DST, the health risks hold to be far greater.
    The program was originally proposed to save money during wartime. Proponents of DST argue the benefits such as reduced power usage and decreased crime rates. According to a study conducted by the US Department of Energy, the United States average annual energy usage dropped by 0.03%. Naturally, with increased hours of sunlight, Americans will tend to use less electricity, conserving energy. Along with this, according to a study conducted by Stanford University researchers, there is a clear correlation between Daylight Savings and reduced crime rates. These dropped crime rates occur from March to November, a period generally with more hours of sunlight.
    However, DST holds many health risks such as increased rates in heart attacks and traffic accidents. According to Roberto Manfredini of the University of Farfarra in Italy, there is a significant increase in the risk of heart attacks following particularly the spring transition. This finding is based upon the heavy influence of light and dark on the human system’s circadian rhythm. Along with this, DST generally increases the time discrepancy between the social clock and body clock, triggering effects such as increased car accidents the weeks following particularly the spring transition. According to Rachel Carey of Department of Clinical, Educational and Health Psychology in London, the week following the spring transition holds to increase fatal car crashes by 6%. This is largely due to the body’s naturally off-set circadian rhythm, as well as factors like sleep deprivation.
    Through these intense health risks, the United States should choose to alter century-old DST in order to protect the American people and promote a healthier society.

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    The United States should make changes to the current Daylight Savings Time (DST). DST includes gaining an hour in the spring, and losing an hour in th…

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  • Savannah from North Carolina

    Daylight saving time was established in 1916 for the purpose of expanding the daylight hours. This time-change was thought of as a solution to conserving fuel. Daylight saving time begins on the second Sunday in March, while clocks are turned ahead an hour. The change ends on the first Sunday in November, gaining an extra hour of sleep by turning clocks back. However, many effects of Daylight saving time are not positive, but surprisingly negative.
    The United States should completely disinvolve our country with Daylight saving time. By taking our bodies through this time change, we negatively alter our circadian rhythm. The body is adapted to a daily routine. When we change the time, our bodies’ rhythms do not adjust. This change throws off our body patterns and creates a more difficult adjustment. “When we implement small changes into a biological system which by themselves seem trivial, their effects, when viewed in a broader context, may have a much larger impact than we had thought,” said Till Roenneberg of Ludwig-Maximilian-University in Munich, Germany.
    Daylight saving time can also negatively affect our bodies’ organs. In 2018, American Heart Association reported that this time change leaves people with a greater chance of receiving a heart attack or stroke. “A 2014 study in the journal Open Heart found that on the Monday after DST begins, 24% more people have heart attacks than on other Mondays throughout the year,” according to The Insider. “On the flip side, the study noted a 21% decrease in heart attacks the Tuesday after DST ends.”
    By updating daylight saving time, our bodies will be put under less stress and time change. We would benefit greatly from keeping a constant time throughout the year. From medical and mental standpoints, our bodies will maintain a healthier state if daylight saving time was taken out of our yearly pattern.

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    Daylight saving time was established in 1916 for the purpose of expanding the daylight hours. This time-change was thought of as a solution to conserv…

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  • Jessica from North Carolina

    When the United States joined World War I, Congress enacted the Standard Time Act of 1918 which established daylight savings time. The goal of the act was to ultimately reduce energy usage by having longer days. While this may have been beneficial over 100 years ago, times are different now, and there has been much debate between states on whether or not to keep the process. Because of its negative impacts on human health and overall confusing nature, the government should make changes to daylight savings time.

    The one hour of sleep lost to daylight savings time can be more than just a minor inconvenience. According to journalist Anne Buckle, multiple studies around the world have shown negative impacts on human health due to the lack of sleep. One study from Sweden found an increase in heart attack rates the first 3 weekdays following the time shift forward. Even Dan Nosowitz, a journalist who supports keeping daylight savings time admits this fact. Buckle also mentions its effects on a person’s mental health, especially those with seasonal affective disorder. A study from Denmark “found an 11% increase in depression cases after the time seasonal change.” These statistics prove how the lack of sleep from daylight savings time can severely impact an individual’s physical and mental health. If the United States government were to reduce these effects, then making changes to daylight savings time would be a good factor to consider.

    Along with its negative health effects, the overall process of daylight savings time can bring about much confusion within people. Several government officials agree with this. California lawmaker Kansen Chu states that “shifting back and forth in the spring and fall, if it ever really made sense, no longer does.” Novelist and lecturer Micheal Downing from Tufts University also claims that “most people don’t even understand whether moving the clocks forward gives them more sunlight or less sunlight in the morning. They just can’t remember what it does, because it so defies logic.” To avoid further confusion, then the government officials should take action to make changes to the current daylight savings time laws.

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    When the United States joined World War I, Congress enacted the Standard Time Act of 1918 which established daylight savings time. The goal of the act…

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  • Evan from North Carolina

    Yes the United States should make changes to daylight saving because, according to Reader’s Digest, it would decrease the amount of crimes and save money and energy. In a society that is ever increasing population wise it is essential that every effort necessary needs to be taken to avoid crime and other expenditures. Something as simple as changing a law, such as this, shouldn’t be an impasse for the system. And according to the Wall Street Journal the annual shift in time causes major health defects to those in various areas, like higher risk of heart attack and strokes. The website Science Alert further supports the health defect argument by reaffirming the increase in heart disease that Daylight Savings causes. The risks to public health shows that a law such as this should be abolished. Any sort of government action that directly results in the defects of citizens’ health should cause immediate action against that law to avoid further negative effects to society. The article published in Popular Mechanics written by Dan Nosowitz states to be in support of keeping Daylight Savings as is, but with language like “claiming DST is garbage” and “#lifehack”, the reliability of this author is questionable. The articles from Readers Digest and The Wall Street Journal are institutions whose reliability is their longevity as news sources. This means that Popular Mechanics shouldn’t be taken fully seriously with the fact checking against that of another source. From Readers Digest we see that a few states have already requested a time zone change, while this isn’t completely correlated with Daylight Savings time it shows that some states aren’t happy with time zones. Which is further shown by Hawaii and Arizona not complying with Daylight Savings as a whole. There are also several other states that are putting in place a standard time which are Arkansas, Colorado, Florida, Idaho, Kansas, Oklahoma, Oregon, Alaska, and Tennessee, this also shows that states are seeing a negative effect on their communities when it comes to Daylight savings time.

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    Yes the United States should make changes to daylight saving because, according to Reader’s Digest, it would decrease the amount of crimes and save mo…

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  • Parker from North Carolina

    Daylight saving time should not be in effect anymore in the United States because of the lack of production caused by fatigue, it doesn’t save energy, and it can negatively affect your health.
    Daylight saving time should be abolished because of the lack of production caused by it when we lose an hour. Studies have shown a trend each year around the time that we lose an hour. Around this time each year, there is less productivity, due to loss of sleep, which ultimately costs money. Timeanddate.com also says that New York City spends 1.5 million dollars on a dusk and darkness safety campaign due to daylight saving time.
    The main reason that we have daylight saving time is to save energy, which might have worked back when it started during WWI but is now irrelevant. We always have our computers, television, and air conditioning on, so our lights take up a minuscule amount compared to these other causes of energy consumption. The amount of natural light that we get will not affect our use of computers for work or ac units due to the heat in the summer and cold in the winter. The main reason for daylight saving time is now irrelevant.
    There have also been health problems associated with daylight saving time. There have been studies conducted that show that around the change in time, there is an increase in car accidents, workplace injuries, and suicides. The fatigue leads to tired people who have lost sleep behind the wheel and these people heading to work where, depending on how dangerous your job is, workplace injuries could be fatal. The loss of sunlight in November has also been linked to an increase in depression, due to less time spent outside.
    Daylight saving time should be abolished due to the fact that it causes a lack of productivity, it doesn’t accomplish its main goal, save energy, and it has a negative effect on people’s physical and mental health.

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    Daylight saving time should not be in effect anymore in the United States because of the lack of production caused by fatigue, it doesn’t save energ…

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  • jack from North Carolina

    On a personal level I like daylight savings time because I play lacrosse. Lacrosse season is during the fall and the first couple of weeks of the season are before daylight savings time. During this time we have to cut practices really short because we don’t have enough sunlight to see the ball towards the end. After daylight savings we can hold longer practices and work more towards getting our team better. At the same time i can’t just say that we should keep it because it helps my schedule, that’s just extremely selfish. So on a national basis I think we should get rid of daylight savings times because it messes with people’s circadian rhythms.
    A cridadum rhythm is like the clock in your head, it tells you when you should go to bed and wake up roughly. Moving the time back and forth an hour twice a year can mess with people’s circadian rhythms. As stated in the Wall Street Journal, messing with people’s circadian rhythm can make them more prone to life threatening diseases like, heart attacks and strokes.
    With this in mind we should look at why it’s really necessary to add and take an hour away in the year. Currently there is not real meaning to it, it was first introduced back during World War 1 to help the soldiers stay awake for longer, so they can fight longer. I think we live in a time where that doesn’t really need to happen. We are currently fighting people in the middle east but we aren’t fighting the same way. In World War 1 it was a trench warfare battle without really any air support because it was a new innovation. Currently we have new and improved technology that we can fight wars from the air.
    So in my opinion we shouldn’t have to sacrifice an hour of the day every year for something that isn’t even current anymore.

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    On a personal level I like daylight savings time because I play lacrosse. Lacrosse season is during the fall and the first couple of weeks of the seas…

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  • Eyad from North Carolina

    I believe that the United States should change daylight savings time as a result of its link to numerous health problems and outdated purposes. Daylight savings time was established in the U.S on March 9th, 1918, under the 1918 Standard Time Act. This method helped reduce energy costs by the U.S military, with it entering in World War I. At the time, daylight savings time proved to be effective with the technology at the time, however with today’s advancements in lighting and electricity, the need for daylight savings time is futile in the 21st century. Despite it being a primitive factor in today’s age, daylight savings time has also been proven to cause multiple health and mental problems for both children and adults. “Most of us end up losing 40 to 50 minutes of sleep those first few days — and as a nation that’s significantly sleep-deprived to begin with, even that little change can impact health,” says Sandhya Kumar, the assistant professor of neurology and medical director of the Sleep Disorders Center at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center. Although it doesn’t seem like a lot of sleep is lost, the effects can prove disastrous in our daily lives. The American Heart Association reported in 2018, that DST brought a higher risk of heart attacks, along with a study in Sweden that concluded there was a 6.7% greater risk of developing heart attacks in just the first three days. DST has also been linked to a decrease in productivity, leading to an increase in workplace injuries, Seasonal Affective Disorder and sadly suicide, as reported in a 2008 Australian study on sleep and biological rythms. Daylight savings time has proven to not only be a useless practice in our modern era, but also a vector of several cardiovascular diseases and mental issues, that serve no place in our society.

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    I believe that the United States should change daylight savings time as a result of its link to numerous health problems and outdated purposes. Daylig…

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  • Jackson from New Mexico

    I believe that the Daylight Savings Time system should be modified in the United States. Originally, Daylight Savings Time was established in WWI to help save energy, but now that 100 years have passed, it does not hold the same value anymore. Now, sleep is more vital than ever to humans because of the workaholic nature our society has currently built for itself. One of the biggest groups affected regularly by Daylight Savings Time are teenagers. Teenagers have very fragile circadian rhythms and can be messed up very easily. The CDC supported this by reporting in 2019 that depression and anxiety rates have been rising over time (CDC, 2019). As teenagers are the rising adults of the country, wearing them out sooner than later because of an outdated sleep schedule is not a good idea at all for our country. First of all, teenagers are already feeling more burnt out due to other major factors in their lives, such as their school work. As more colleges in the United States are setting higher expectations for their students, the high schoolers who are looking to go to college have to amp up their workload to meet these standards and stay afloat in the current economic climate where the top 1% of U.S. citizens control the economy and force the cycle of poverty to repeat. But, teenagers are not the only people who are majorly affected by Daylight Savings Time. According to the Administration of Community Living, senior citizens make up approximately 49 million, or 1/7, of the United States population (ACL, 2018). The elderly are even more prone to feeling out of whack after Spring Forward and Fall Back, because their joints and bones hold more pressure due to the weathering their bodies have experienced over their lifetimes. As a lot of the population is unnecessarily thrown off by Daylight Savings Time and nobody really needs it to succeed, then it should not be continued as a national event.

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    I believe that the Daylight Savings Time system should be modified in the United States. Originally, Daylight Savings Time was established in WWI to h…

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  • Charles from North Carolina

    The transition in and out of daylight savings time, despite its good intentions, only serves to create confusion. It was initially established in the U.S. in order to conserve energy during the first world war, when the fuels burned to make electricity were deemed more valuable to the war effort, and was reinstated during World War II for the same reason. In the modern day, with better access to cheap electricity, it is no longer necessary to switch out of daylight savings time in the winter, because it is easy enough to light American homes during the winter months.

    Because of its non uniform adoption, daylight savings time serves as a source of widespread confusion, especially when coordinating across state borders. Someone on the border of New Mexico, for example, may schedule an appointment in Arizona, which does not observe daylight savings time, and show up an hour after they were expected. In addition, people in Arizona constantly have to consider daylight savings in order to catch episodes of television series, news broadcasts, online lectures, and live videos. Even those who wish to conserve daylight savings as-is must admit that this system is inefficient and greatly inconveniences people trying to work around the strange rules.

    On top of being a source of confusion, daylight saving time, which is bad enough in cities, where it causes increased accidents and can even exacerbate the risk of heart failure, can completely disrupt the schedules of farmers. Even an article for Popular Mechanics titled “Why Daylight Savings is Actually A Good Thing,” the adverse effects of daylight savings time on farmers is admitted. Farmers rely on being able to know which times correspond to which placements of the sun, and when time itself cannot be relied on to stay consistent, this becomes a hassle when attempts are made to schedule harvests in advance.

    Daylight savings is inconvenient. It serves to create confusion, to cause problems for farmers and city dwellers alike, and is no longer necessary because of modern conveniences. It must be updated for the modern day in order to mitigate the issues that surround it.

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    The transition in and out of daylight savings time, despite its good intentions, only serves to create confusion. It was initially established in the …

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  • Brooke from North Carolina

    The United States should make changes to Daylight Savings Time. Daylight Savings Time is a seasonal change when Americans set their clocks ahead by one hour. It was originally implemented as an attempt to save fuel during wartime, but now that war is over, Americans question the practicality of this system.
    Those who favor Daylight Savings Time claim that it promotes active lifestyles. Although there may be more daylight during the spring and summer, there is much less sunlight during the fall and winter. This can be detrimental to our mental health. As the adjustment might be an inconvenience to some, it can be quite harmful to many others. Seasonal Affective Disorder is a mood disorder that occurs during a specific season, typically during wintertime when there is little to no sunlight. Those affected by SAD show symptoms such as feeling depressed, eating more, sleeping more, feeling guilty or worthless, and losing interest in activities that normally interest them. Our bodies have a natural sleeping pattern, otherwise known as the circadian rhythm. This “internal clock” is set based on our exposure to the sun. Changing our normal sleeping pattern, even by an hour, can disrupt it, which can take a toll on our health.
    Daylight Savings Time ultimately decreases productivity. “Spring Monday” is the Monday after the spring time change and is also one of the most sleep-deprived days of the year. Employees are commonly found cyber-loafing and sleeping on the job due to overall exhaustion and loss of concentration. According to Massive Science, there have been higher reports of heart attacks, traffic accidents, higher workplace injuries, and emergency room visits around the time we adjust our clocks.
    Some argue that Daylight Savings Time boosts our economy, but one must also consider how expensive it can be. Economist William F. Shughart II, PhD, states, “The simple act of changing clocks costs Americans $1.7 billion in lost opportunity cost based on average hourly wages.” Those working during the time change are paid an extra hour that they are not actually working. Additionally, the airline industry reported that they lost $147 million in 2007, since not Daylight Savings Time is not globally observed. Overall, the negative effects of Daylight Savings Time far outweigh the few benefits that it has to offer. Therefore, the United States should make changes to their system in order to positively impact Americans’ health, increase productivity, and save money.

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    The United States should make changes to Daylight Savings Time. Daylight Savings Time is a seasonal change when Americans set their clocks ahead by on…

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  • Harrison from North Carolina

    Harrison Ershadi
    March 18, 2020
    Daylight Savings

    I believe that daylight savings time should be changed in the United States. I believe this because it no longer saves energy, it is harmful to our health, and it is costing the US money. First, daylight savings time no longer saves energy. Because it was introduced over 100 years ago sunlight meant less energy, however in our modern day society it doesn’t matter if the sun is up or down we continue to use an enormous amount of energy. Secondly, daylight savings time is harmful to our health. It has been proven that losing an hour of sleep because of daylight savings time disrupts our body’s natural circadian rhythm, which can induce stress as well as make us more tired. According to a study done by the American College of Cardiology in 2014 it was found that “there was a 25% jump in the number of heart attacks the day after we sprung forward an hour”. Furthermore the same study found that there was a “21% percent drop in the number of heart attacks the day after we went back to standard time”. This is just one prime example of how daylight savings time negatively affects our health. Daylight savings time has also been linked to depression, car accidents, suicides, and miscarriages. Finally, daylight savings time is costing the US too much money. It costs money to run the daylight savings campaigns and in New York alone $1.5 million dollars was spent on their dusk to dawn safety campaign. However, it is not just costing us our money it is also costing us our time and energy. It costs more money for manufacturers to install the ability to change the clocks into daylight savings mode, as well as our energy to manually change them. Daylight savings time may have once been a great thing for society, however times have changed, and it is time for daylight savings to change with it, so for these reasons I believe that daylight savings time should be changed.

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    Harrison Ershadi
    March 18, 2020
    Daylight Savings

    I believe that daylight savings time should be changed in the United States. I believe this …

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  • david from Alabama

    For more than a hundred years now, we have been setting our clocks back an hour on the last Sunday of April to make better use of sunlight. Most people might agree with keeping this cycle going annually but I say that we need to end this cycle before it can do any more damage to our health and sleeping schedules. Experts say that a growing body of evidence shows that the annual time shift is not good for our health and it can disrupt our circadian rhythms and sleep and this can lead to a higher risk of heart attacks as well as atrial fibrillation, strokes and potentially car accidents. Although daylight-saving time can bring more daylight in the evening, we can not risk people’s health and safety for something that is not even that important. Furthermore, we need to protect our young generations’ health too because they are in the process of growing and this daylight-saving time cycle could affect them greatly for the rest of their life by interrupting their growth. Therefore, we need to opt out of daylight saving and elect to go on standard time permanently.

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    For more than a hundred years now, we have been setting our clocks back an hour on the last Sunday of April to make better use of sunlight. Most peopl…

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  • Noelle from North Carolina

    SHOULD THE U.S. MAKE CHANGES TO DAYLIGHT SAVING TIME?

    I believe the United States should make changes to daylight savings time. Daylight savings time was established during World War I as a way to provide additional sunlight for the soldiers to fight for their countries. Currently, daylight savings is a way to reduce the use of electric lighting. However, according to the Energy Information Administration, “lighting now accounts for only around 10% of the electricity used in the country” and it will continue to decrease as a result of the increased usage of LED light bulbs. Additionally, California conducted a study that examined the effects of daylight savings time on reduced energy use. They found that daylight savings time had “little or no effect on the state’s energy use”. In fact, some studies have found that daylight savings time actually increases energy consumption. In Indiana, researchers analyzed the electricity usage of the state before and after daylight savings time was implemented. They found that Indianna actually “ increased its use of electricity by around 1% following the adoption of DST”. Not only does daylight savings time affect electricity usage, but also can potentially affect citizens’ health. As a teenager, I can attest that the start of daylight savings time routinely interrupts my sleep schedule. This results in me being less focused during school and more tired during swim practice. Not only does daylight savings time affect our sleep pattern, but it can also affect depression levels and heart attack occurrence. A study in Sleep and Biological Rhythms found that suicide rates spiked following week after daylight savings time. Moreover, a 2010 study at the University of Alabama at Birmingham concluded that “heart attack risk increases by 10% in the first two days after the switch to DST – and then drops by 10% after the switch back in the fall.” Based on these few studies, daylight savings does nothing to contribute to our overall health and has been proven to counteract its purpose of reducing energy usage. Thus, the United States should make changes to daylight savings time.

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    SHOULD THE U.S. MAKE CHANGES TO DAYLIGHT SAVING TIME?

    I believe the United States should make changes to daylight savings time. Daylight savings t…

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  • Caleb from North Carolina

    We should make changes to daylight savings time (DST). There are no valid reasons for the time change, as there is nothing to support that it helps people in today’s society. Historically, America was mainly an agrarian society. In turn, it was believed that farmers needed daylight savings time to work their fields. This is incorrect however, as the article Daylight Savings time is actually a good thing by Dan Nosowitz states “Farmers, contrary to the strange and completely false belief that DST was created for them actually despise it”. These farmers do not like this change to daylight savings. This is due to the fact it changes their whole schedule, as the sun determines their workday, not the clock. This change of the clock does not give them any more sunlight than they had before, thus doing nothing beneficial. Another reason people believe that DST was implemented was to save energy. As the article, Here’s when and why daylight savings time started in the US, by Kathleen Elkins states “The concept resurfaced during WWI as a way to save energy. The idea was that people would spend more time outside, and less time inside with the lights on at night, thereby conserving electricity”. This may have been an effective energy saving technique during the 1920s and 1930s, but now at a time when we rely on electricity more than ever, it is ineffective at achieving this goal. Nosowitz further points out that “In Indiana, a 2006 study found that DST created a 1 percent rise in energy use, the opposite of what its supposed to do”. Rarely mentioned with this additional use of energy brought forth by DST, is adverse environmental effects. According to the EPA, the environmental effects produced by electrical use are “emissions of greenhouse gases” along with “other pollutants”. Another consequence the EPA additionally states is “discharges of pollution into water bodies”. This increase in electrical consumption due to daylight saving time is therefore contributing to increased levels of pollution, and worsening the effects of climate change. With these negative issues DST is not achieving its initial purpose, and therefore no longer effective. As a result, we should do away with DST.

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    We should make changes to daylight savings time (DST). There are no valid reasons for the time change, as there is nothing to support that it helps pe…

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  • Emily from Connecticut

    When no longer live in a time where we need to rely on the sun and nature to tell us the time. We live in a digital world now.

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  • tristin from Oklahoma

    I think it should be changed because it messes with people’s minds. It really makes it hard for students that have gotten used to the time before the change ever happen. it makes it harder to make it to school because you lose an hour of sleep.

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    I think it should be changed because it messes with people’s minds. It really makes it hard for students that have gotten used to the time before the …

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  • Hannah from Oregon

    Daylight Savings needs to go. We have lights everywhere and coffee at the ready; we don’t need light at an earlier hour anymore, especially not at the cost of health, focus, and general function. What is needed now is to keep an hour of light in the later hours, for kids who have afternoon sports and don’t want to go to and leave school in the dark, for people with seasonal depression, and so on! It needs to go!

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    Daylight Savings needs to go. We have lights everywhere and coffee at the ready; we don’t need light at an earlier hour anymore, especially not at the…

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  • austin from California

    Yes the US should make a change because DST cause tons of student to have there sleep schedules messed and because of that it cause students to not get as much from school as we should by changing DST it could help students take more from school because there sleep schedule remains the same and students won’t wake up at 5 when they meant to wake up at 6 so yes I believe that the US should make changes to DST because it would help students as well as adults

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    Yes the US should make a change because DST cause tons of student to have there sleep schedules messed and because of that it cause students to not ge…

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  • Taja from Arkansas

    I think that all of what was said in the paragraph is exactly what I’m saying and hopefully it’ll change because I need all my hours of sleep.

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  • TJ from Kentucky

    The US should change daylight savings time. Instead the US should try to unite the countries of the world under one standard system in order to support international travel, business and other activities. The world has standardised time zones and it is time for the world to create a standard for daylight savings time or get rid of daylight savings time completely.

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    The US should change daylight savings time. Instead the US should try to unite the countries of the world under one standard system in order to suppor…

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  • Grady from Kentucky

    There should be changes made to daylight savings time. While it isn’t that big of a deal, it is still annoying to have to go through gaining an hour and then losing an hour. Since we’ve already been doing it for so long, it’s easier to just keep the system we have, but the system really doesn’t have too much benefit, and if anything, it has some negatives. One example is that there are always the people who will forget about the time change and be late for something. If we were to remove the system altogether then it would make our lives easier and save us from doing extra unnecessary work.

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    There should be changes made to daylight savings time. While it isn’t that big of a deal, it is still annoying to have to go through gaining an hour a…

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  • Kelly from Kentucky

    I believe that Daylight Savings Time has created such complexities and confusion that it should be changed or, furthermore, removed. The time shift causes a mass amount of sleep deprivation two times a year, leaving the Nation with a great loss of money from a lack of productivity. Not only does this affect the economy, it also leads to too much confusion on who follows the shift or not. Arizona alone has at least 8 different areas abide or refuse to abide by the time shift. Finally, in some areas, it costs more money to power the electric because of an earlier start or later start to the day.

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    I believe that Daylight Savings Time has created such complexities and confusion that it should be changed or, furthermore, removed. The time shift ca…

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  • Emma from Kentucky

    I feel that the times shouldn’t change. I feel that we should keep the same amount of sun throughout the whole year. There are no interruptions to the circadian rhythm, sleep schedule, and crime rates. I feel that they should make a set time schedule so that there are no interruptions.

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    I feel that the times shouldn’t change. I feel that we should keep the same amount of sun throughout the whole year. There are no interruptions to the…

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  • Elhadj from Kentucky

    It’s nice to have more sunlight during summer. Maybe because we’re used to the change in time due to the seasons, but it only seems right that winter has less sunlight and summer has more. Daylight saving time also saves more on electricity than standard time does.

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    It’s nice to have more sunlight during summer. Maybe because we’re used to the change in time due to the seasons, but it only seems right that winter …

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  • Michael from Michigan

    The United States should get rid of daylight savings time because it is a waste of time. I believe that time is a very valuable thing, and students need their sleep. Science has proven that students already wake up too early for school and that is detrimental to their health. Add daylight savings time to that then they lose another hour of sleep.

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    The United States should get rid of daylight savings time because it is a waste of time. I believe that time is a very valuable thing, and students ne…

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  • Allison from Kentucky

    The US should make changes to daylight savings. Setting clocks forward and backward to give people more sunshine during the day is an outdated system that no longer benefits people. The amount of conflict that comes out of this time emphasizes its need to change. Because so many places across the world both A). have different time zones and B). are further from the equator, the hour set back can cause lots of confusion that simply can be avoided. When other place chooses to ignore daylight savings the whole world suffers. Arizona chooses to not observe daylights savings but places in Arizona do observe daylight saving so you could go through several time changes while traveling through. In my opinion you can do daylights savings but everyone needs to do it to avoid confusion.

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    The US should make changes to daylight savings. Setting clocks forward and backward to give people more sunshine during the day is an outdated system …

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  • Halee from Kentucky

    I think that the US should change daylight saving time because it changes everyone’s sleep schedules around. Getting one less hour of sleep doesn’t seem like all that much but it really is. Children and teens are affected the most by this. I, as a teenager, am affected and notice a change in daily life due to this time change. Since the time change it has caused me to become more tired and less focused on class work and more on getting in sleep because I am tired. This can affect grades in students all across the world. Even though this system was created over 100 years ago, somethings need to change to accommodate the modern world. I don’t think that this time change is necessary. If someone wants to stay out longer in the summer to enjoy the weather, then that person will do what they want even if the sun is going down. Plus nowadays, children and teens don’t stay outside in the summer because it is too hot.

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    I think that the US should change daylight saving time because it changes everyone’s sleep schedules around. Getting one less hour of sleep doesn’…

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  • Christian from Kentucky

    I agree that there are many benefits to having more sunlight so I would say that instead of moving the clock forward or backward that we instead just move to daylight savings. By doing this you eliminate the confusion and complications of doing international business, you eliminate the lack of productivity that happens during the week of a time shift, and you get all the benefits of having more sunlight. This time switch will ultimately allow people to take better advantage of the outdoors and the crime rate will also drop because it will be lighter outside for longer.

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    I agree that there are many benefits to having more sunlight so I would say that instead of moving the clock forward or backward that we instead just …

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  • Sarah from Indiana

    Overall, I believe that the United States should make changes to Daylight Saving Time because I believe it is unneeded. Additionally, there is not a huge benefit or drawback to having this change in time every year. Financially, it has no benefit to the country if anything companies lose money after Daylight Saving Time from employees experiencing sleep deprivation and lack of the ability to focus. Also, this sleep deprivation leads to more suicides and heart issues as a lack of sleep increases the rate of these horrific things. Furthermore, switching the time on a Monday is a rough way to start the week. In my opinion, I see no real benefit to Daylight Saving Time and believe it’s time for the government to get rid of it.

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    Overall, I believe that the United States should make changes to Daylight Saving Time because I believe it is unneeded. Additionally, there is not a h…

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  • Colin from Kentucky

    I think that daylight savings is a useless and trivial tradition that holds negligible positive value to the US. It disrupts the Circadian rhythm, causes trouble when planning meetings, and has limited benefits. It may have saved money 100 years ago, but today lightbulbs and artificial lighting are much more efficient, making the modern benefit negligible.

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    I think that daylight savings is a useless and trivial tradition that holds negligible positive value to the US. It disrupts the Circadian rhythm, cau…

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  • Dane from Kentucky

    I believe the government should make changes to the daylight savings time change. The later daylight is nice, but who needs that much daylight towards the night. Most adults have to get up and get to work in the mornings and it being pitch black is not good. Having to leave in the pitch black when you are tired and grumpy makes most in an even worse mood. I believe the extra daylight at night is unneeded to most as nights are for more relaxation for most households. If the government is worried about it being a hard change to a different system, most find it harder to lose an hour of sleep. I think the system should be changed and really looked at as it makes some unhappy.

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    I believe the government should make changes to the daylight savings time change. The later daylight is nice, but who needs that much daylight towards…

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  • Katie from Kentucky

    I think that the United States should make changes to Daylight Savings Time because it is very inconvenient and does more harm than good. Why can’t we just have more sunlight in the winter too? We shouldn’t have to change our clocks twice a year and suffer from more sleep loss which has major effects on health and productivity. Half of the time, it is still nice weather when the clocks do change and we are left with less time outside because it gets darker faster, but the temperature is still nice to enjoy. I think we should keep our clocks at the same time every year to help aid in health and consistency. Some devices and cars do not automatically change, so people can be an hour off the next day on accident. It would be so much more beneficial to keep the clocks the same all throughout the year.

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    I think that the United States should make changes to Daylight Savings Time because it is very inconvenient and does more harm than good. Why can’t …

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  • Luke from Kentucky

    I would like there to be a consistent clock throughout the world. Americans and other countries change their clocks on different dates throughout the year, it is not a set date when everyone changes. An easy way to solve this problem is by keeping our clocks the same the entire year. Adjusting the clocks throws off everyones circadian rhythms and their daily routine. People are much more drowsy the week after the clocks change throughout the world. Also other studies have shown how the suicide rate is much higher on these days and the chances of someone having a heart attack also increase. Therefore, I think the clocks should stay the same throughout the year.

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    I would like there to be a consistent clock throughout the world. Americans and other countries change their clocks on different dates throughout the…

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  • jp from Kentucky

    I think that we do not need daylight savings time. It has negative medical side effects and makes people less productive the week after a time change. it is overall a hassle to change clocks once a year. when other countries use different time standards it can be confusing and make intranasal business.

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    I think that we do not need daylight savings time. It has negative medical side effects and makes people less productive the week after a time change….

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  • Katie from Kentucky

    In my opinion, Daylight Savings Time is irrelevant and causes more harm than good. This time change causes a lot of commotion and has a negative effect on the majority of people’s sleep health. Though this time change allows for more sunlight in the summer this pro absolutely does not outweigh the many cons that come with the time change. Having this time change creates a lot of problems in the business world with scheduling and it also affects the children because they get less sleep leading to sleep deprivation and many other health problems. Overall the United States needs to get rid of Daylight Savings Time because it causes more harm than good.

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    In my opinion, Daylight Savings Time is irrelevant and causes more harm than good. This time change causes a lot of commotion and has a negative effec…

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  • Logan from Kentucky

    Daylight savings is not necessary at this point in time and does not have any significant benefits. Any benefits are easily outweighed by the hassle and complications which come with changing the clocks. While it may be difficult to begin the process of removing it, in the end, its best we do without daylight savings.

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    Daylight savings is not necessary at this point in time and does not have any significant benefits. Any benefits are easily outweighed by the hassle a…

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  • Kise from Missouri

    While I think the U.S. should make changes to it due to it affecting the health of people (mostly teens and children) negatively via altering sleep schedules and such, I also think it has some good things about it. These would be that it’s a tradition, it lowers crime rates when we have more daylight, and it gives people more reason to be outside in the evening. The bad things outweigh the good though, seeing as it leads to people being more tired when they lose an hour of sleep. Giving another hour of sleep/nighttime leads to more crime as well. It makes people hurt more than it benefits them and that’s a major issue.

    It also affects adults, seeing as they can’t adjust to the change as well as younger people. This has been shown within my school and at my home. Due to the changes in how much sleep one needs as they age, people tend not to adjust very well the older they get. The changes are supported with the following; “In addition to changes in sleep duration, sleep patterns also change as we age….Humans possess an internal 24-hour clock, also called the circadian pacemaker, that partly determines the time when people fall asleep and when they wake, as well as their alertness level while they are awake…As people age, however, the window during which the internal clock enables sleep narrows” (“Changes in Sleep with Age.” Changes in Sleep with Age | Healthy Sleep, Division of Sleep Medicine at Harvard Medical School, 18 Dec. 2007, healthysleep.med.harvard.edu/healthy/science/variations/changes-in-sleep-with-age). This shows that we go by an internal clock.. and alterations just make that unaligned. This causes us to be tired and have a harder time adjusting to changes in their sleep schedule, which is more reasoning as to why daylight savings time needs to change.

    I do see why someone would say that it shouldn’t change, seeing as I mentioned the crime rates and such, but there are far more negatives to keeping it the same.

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    While I think the U.S. should make changes to it due to it affecting the health of people (mostly teens and children) negatively via altering sleep sc…

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  • Hannah from Alabama

    The United States should use Daylight Savings Time year round. This would allow Americans the benefit of daylight in the summer, while keeping them from having to switch.

    Switching times twice a year is both dangerous and uncomfortable. It leads to heart attacks due to stress, wrecks because people are late to work, and just generally wreaks havoc in your week. This violates the rights of the American people to “life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness”.

    While, it would be a mistake to do away with Daylight Savings Time. Doing away with Daylight standard time would solve many of our problems.

    As it currently stands, states can vote to switch to Daylight Standard Time year round, but they cannot switch to Daylight Standard Time. Congress should pass a bill allowing states do Daylight Savings Time all year long.

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    The United States should use Daylight Savings Time year round. This would allow Americans the benefit of daylight in the summer, while keeping them fr…

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  • lory from Texas

    i do think the U.S should make changes to daylight saving because its something that actually benefits communities as well as affecting how much electricity or resources we waste every day.

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    i do think the U.S should make changes to daylight saving because its something that actually benefits communities as well as affecting how much elect…

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  • Shelby from Virginia

    I do not believe that the US should make changes to daylight savings time (DST), because as a whole it is beneficial to our society. The reason that this is such a good thing is that it gives us more sunlight in the evening, which is when most people have time to go outside. As a result of more daylight in the evenings, many benefits can be observed, such as less crime and depression, and more exercise and time spent outside. On the other hand, some argue that DST is not beneficial because it gives people less sleep for one night, which can have some effects for a few days after. However, this is definitely not a good enough reason to do away with DST, because it has lasting benefits for eight months of the year, so its downside for a couple of days does not outweigh the many positives that are felt in the long run.

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    I do not believe that the US should make changes to daylight savings time (DST), because as a whole it is beneficial to our society. The reason that t…

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  • Simi from Maryland

    For decades, most of the United States has observed the practice, dedicatedly changing clock times every year. According to NBC News, 36 states proposed bills altering or eliminating daylight savings in 2019. The United States government should completely eliminate daylight savings times The most compelling reasons for this are the adverse health effects, loss of capital, and increase of criminal activity that come along with the practice.

    Most Americans are familiar with the notorious day after the beginning of daylight savings called “Sleepy Monday.” The other factors that aren’t mentioned as a result of Sleepy Monday are the increased likelihood of heart issues and strokes that come with daylight savings. Research from the peer-reviewed academic journal “Openheart” has shown that daylight savings is responsible for a 24% increase in acute myocardial infarction (AMI.) In simple terms, switching our clocks like we do during daylight savings can substantially increase the likelihood for heart attacks. Additionally, the academic journal “Sleep Medicine” published a research report depicting how daylight savings had caused an 8% increase of ischemic strokes due to the disruption of circadian rhythm. Proponents of daylight savings hold the belief that the makes people happier, as they have an extra hour of daylight everyday. While this may be circumstantially true, the tremendously daunting threat of a heart attack or stroke due to a simple time change cannot be looked over. It especially cannot be looked over as a 24% increase is significant in regards to the large number of heart attacks we already have annually. It is our Constitutional duty to protect Americans, and continuing the practice of daylight savings despite the plethora of research proving it’s harmful effects is neglecting the American right to life as stated in the right to life, liberty, and property of the Constitution.

    Daylight savings time has caused strains on the economy, resulting in annual losses of capital. Proponents of daylight savings commonly use the argument that daylight savings actually works to generate capital, as more people are spending time out during summer, causing them to spend more money. However, research from Liz Brown, founder of Sleeping Lucid, has found that it is extremely costly for companies to undergo daylight savings time since business hours are forced to adjust. Research from David Wagner of the University of Oregon shows that it costs the United States approximately $430 million annually. These costs are made up of adjusted business hours, increase in workplace injuries, lowered productivity, and heart issues. This amount of money is significant, and substantially outweighs the money being generated in golf courses or amusement parks due to daylight savings.

    While many claim that daylight savings allows for crime rates to lower, research shows that some crime actually increases with daylight savings. A study conducted by the Journal of Experimental Criminology discovered that with changes in time, came an increase of assault rates on the Monday following Daylight Savings. This was found using a quasi maximum likelihood model, and proved to be consistent throughout many trials. By continuing the practice, we are putting Americans at a higher risk of assault, and not following our legal and moral duty as a country to take measures necessary to protect them.

    As a country, we should be taking proper measures to protect our people from harm and ensure that they are given proper opportunity for success. Daylight savings hinders this success, whether it’d be from the adverse health effects it creates, increase in criminal activity it creates, or loss of capital it causes. The practice is outdated, ineffective, and dangerous to our society as a whole. It is for this reason and the other reasons stated that the practice of daylight savings should be discontinued.

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    For decades, most of the United States has observed the practice, dedicatedly changing clock times every year. According to NBC News, 36 states propos…

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    • simi from Maryland

      I added this to the wrong section, meant to put it on the yes side!

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  • Andrea from Texas

    No, I believe that the US should not make a change to Daylight savings. Because of daylight savings, we are able to enjoy more light time in the evening, letting us have more time to do more activities that we enjoy doing during the day. According to an article from the American Home Shield, daylight savings drop the crime rate since there is more light time throughout the day and it ‘minimizes energy consumption’, which lowers the costs on bills. Lastly, daylight savings lowers the incidence of traffic accidents because people can see the road better during the day and not during the night, especially for people whose cars don’t have bright lights which makes it difficult to see the road at night. (“Benefits of Daylight Saving Time: Home Matters.” AHS, American Home Shield, http://www.ahs.com/home-matters/quick-tips/spring-forward-daylight-saving-time/.)

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    No, I believe that the US should not make a change to Daylight savings. Because of daylight savings, we are able to enjoy more light time in the eveni…

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  • Liam from California

    No, the US should not make a change to Daylight Savings Time because it has been in our society for many years. Its main reason for formation was because factory workers needed an extra hour of daylight to produce weapons for the First World War. Today, it is most valuable for our agriculture. Most farmers need an extra hour of sunlight to harvest crops and distribute them across the country. We shouldn’t mess with a system that has worked for many decades.

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    No, the US should not make a change to Daylight Savings Time because it has been in our society for many years. Its main reason for formation was beca…

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    • Grace from Illinois

      Just because something has been around for a long time doesn’t mean it is right. There are many studies showing that DLS is bad for our health and sleep cycle. We no longer are in a time of war and factory workers have a normal 9-5 job. Also agriculture has become much more advance and has machines that harvest crops within hours. I think you hold a good argument but the world is becoming more advance and it is time for a change.

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      Just because something has been around for a long time doesn’t mean it is right. There are many studies showing that DLS is bad for our health and s…

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  • jood from Michigan

    No

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  • Deshun from Texas

    No. The benefits of DST overwhelm the downsides simply because of how the time of sunlight changes throughout the year. Some statistics have been twisted to be against DST when the proper research hadn’t been conducted to support the claims, and that’s why it’s hard to combat the actual upsides of DST.

    DST gives people more time to enjoy the sunlight during the day as opposed to the sun setting way too early and people losing one of the most important things they need in life. Sunlight provides Vitamin C, which is critical to your body’s immune system, maintenance of wounds, and even helps with iron deficiency. Without the right amount of Vitamin C, people can become vulnerable to chronic disease, have weak immune systems, and be more prone to gout attacks. DST also helps with the crime rate and car crashes. This is simply due to the fact that most of these both take place during the night. More daylight means less possibility of these tragedies happening

    Some people argue that DST can throw off sleep schedules and even lead to problems in health. However, these only focus on the phrase “fall back, spring forward,” meaning they only focus on the first and last day of DST. Data from these two days alone can not disprove the 8-month period simply because the data doesn’t outweigh the many benefits of the entire time of DST.

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    No. The benefits of DST overwhelm the downsides simply because of how the time of sunlight changes throughout the year. Some statistics have been twis…

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  • Megan from South Dakota

    Daylight Saving Time first came about during World War 1. The primary purpose was to reduce the amount of fuel needed to make electrical power, due to the extra hour of daylight. Two years later, the U.S implemented the practice. In 1919, after the war had ended, the public disapproved of the practice, which led to its revoke. The practice was once again implemented in World War II to conserve resources for war use. From this time until 1966, daylight saving time was considered as a local choice, for state governments. However, in 1966, the Uniform Time Act was passed to implement the practice throughout the country. (Web Exhibits- Daylight Saving Time). At this point in time, Arizona and Hawaii are the only states that do not use the practice. Daylight Saving Time should not be changed due to its ability to increase natural light, reduce crime rates, lower our carbon footprint, and lowers traffic incidents.
    DST gives us an extra hour of light in the evening, which is appreciated by many, including me. When I get home from school and go to do my chores on the family farm, I greatly appreciate it being light, so I don’t need to hassle with a flashlight. This light also reduces traffic incidents. Various studies have discovered that the shift also saves upwards of 336 lives, due to better driving conditions during prime commute times. Having this extra hour of daylight also reduces our electricity needs and ultimately our carbon footprint.
    This extra daylight also provides extra Vitamin D from the sun, which is a large section of boosting moods, decreasing the effects of seasonal depression, and assisting people in maintaining a healthy lifestyle. This also explains the decrease in crime associated with the shift to DST. According to the Brookings Institute, there is a 7% decrease in crime rate following the shift to DST. Due to a happier, healthier lifestyle all associated with increased exposure to Vitamin D, crime rates drastically drop.
    Some may argue that DST disrupts the human body’s schedule for sleep, eating, and reduces functioning. However, change is something we must all overcome in life, and DST is a prime example of this. As the famous quote says, “Change is good”. The time shift in DST is one prime example of this; it has prepared us for larger changes ahead of us. As the majority of us have become increasingly accustomed to the practice, the benefits have only become clearer. DST should be continued because the benefits greatly outweigh the drawbacks.

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    Daylight Saving Time first came about during World War 1. The primary purpose was to reduce the amount of fuel needed to make electrical power, due to…

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  • Raven from North Carolina

    I think that Daylight Savings Time is a necessity and it shouldn’t be taken away. Daylight savings time makes our days longer and our nights shorter. With the days being longer there is more time for practices and after school activities before dark. Parents that have to get off of work at a certain time have more time to get things done during the day before having to get their kids. There is also more sun throughout the day. Children get to be outside longer. Though I do agree that the first day of switching to Daylight savings may be difficult, it really benefits in the end. Time going up affects everyone in its own way, but when teens lose an hour of sleep before school then it can affect learning. Though this may be true teens don’t have a consistent sleep pattern. It all depends on the things they do during the day. Some teens play sports after school which ends around 7 leaving them to get home around 8 and depending on what they have to do at home they probably won’t have time to do homework until around 10. What about the teens that work? Normally they don’t get off until 10 leaving them to start doing homework around 11. Hours of sleep can’t be determined especially when an hour is lost once a year. More teens miss more than an hour of sleep every night. There is also a 7% decrease in crime because of Daylight Savings Time. It’s also the cause of more success in businesses. More people are willing to go out and walk around and shop.

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    I think that Daylight Savings Time is a necessity and it shouldn’t be taken away. Daylight savings time makes our days longer and our nights shorter…

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  • hannah from Texas

    Daylight saving time has many positive outcomes and the U.S should continue to do it. It gives people to make the most out of their day to do more. It causes the crime rates to go down. Also, it saves more energy because people use less light and other things at night. Since daylight savings allow us to get more done with a natural light source, there is no need to have all the lights powered in at 6pm. It saves everyone money. Lastly it gives you more sleep.

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    Daylight saving time has many positive outcomes and the U.S should continue to do it. It gives people to make the most out of their day to do more. It…

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  • Ethan from North Carolina

    Daylight Savings Time (DST) is an attempt to calibrate the sleep and wake hours in relation to desirable health, economic, and societal benefits. I completely agree with skeptics; the inconsistency of the schedule is frustrating. However, it would be a shame to do away with an idea that makes up in principle for what it lacks in execution. I think it would be a great idea to extend DST to a yearlong schedule, and reap the benefits of more daytime hours.

    DST offers a plethora of benefits as it currently stands; extending it to a yearlong schedule would only intensify what we already see. Daylight Savings Time, due to increased daylight hours, has been shown to increase sunlight exposure. This could be especially significant for individuals that lack time outside; The National Institutes of Health cites several physical, nutritional, and even social benefits related to increased sunlight exposure. Although not every person will modify their habits, DST acts as an engine that incentivizes people to go outside and reap the associated health benefits.

    From a more societal approach, The Review of Economics and Statistics attributed a 7% drop in average crime rates to the increase in daylight hours following DST. While more sunlight may not stop criminals in their tracks, it significantly increases their risk of being caught in the act of committing a crime. Several financial benefits are derived from the reduction in crime, with the Brookings Institution citing a $59 million savings from robberies not committed due to DST.

    While DST has benefits, it is clear that the practice is not yet perfect. Dissenters often point to negative effects on circadian rhythms, skewed schedules, and a multitude of health concerns as reasons to eliminate DST. While these claims are viable, it is important to note that the actual problem is not Daylight Savings Time itself, but the fact that the switch to DST is an uncomfortable adjustment to make twice a year. I would have to agree with my opposition on this contention, yet I advocate for a comprehensive solution: extend DST to a year long schedule. In making this modification, the benefits of DST would be enjoyed throughout the entire calendar year, and the switch from standard time to DST would be nonexistent.

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    Daylight Savings Time (DST) is an attempt to calibrate the sleep and wake hours in relation to desirable health, economic, and societal benefits. I co…

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  • Isabella from North Carolina

    I actually love the Daylight Savings switch; it’s what really changes the melancholic winter feel to a much happier spring sense. People are out enjoying the extra sunlight and the fresh air. Who doesn’t want a longer day? While I have read the reasons to end Daylight Savings Time (DST), it’s only two days out of the year versus eight months.
    There has been a lot of debate on whether DST creates more heart attacks due to the interruption in the circadian rhythm, but, keep in mind, it has been proven that the most amount of heart attacks come in the late winter and early spring out of the entire year. So we can’t solely blame DST for an increase in heart attacks.This change actually has a lot of benefits, particularly regarding health. In an academic article Environmental Health Perspectives, (featured in the U.S. Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health) experts explain the importance of sunlight in our everyday lives. Exposure to sunlight ensures your daily supplement of Vitamin D, shows a higher percentage of increased exercise and socializing, and overall makes many improvements in one’s mental health. With DST, this ensures longer days- more sunlight, which is healthy mentally and physically.
    Aside from individual health improvements, there are also many good societal benefits to keeping DST. A fairly recent paper from the Brookings Institute, notes that there was a 7% decrease in crime rates following DST. This reduction resulted in an estimated $59 million saved from less robberies. More serious matters, like rape, tend to have more costs associated with them- like medical bills, police expenses, etc., but with DST $246 million were saved.
    Well obviously I think that Daylight Savings should be SAVED. There is no significant evidence that leads to it being harmful. If you know how your body reacts, maybe go to bed an hour early when we spring forward. I love DST; I think it puts some pep in everyone’s step, but whether you hate it or not, it’s really only a few days that people are affected by sleep loss.

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  • Charlie from North Carolina

    The dreaded time has arrived for Americans across the country to spring forward their clocks in preparation for daylight savings time. Countrywide you see the sun rising and falling in the sky later in the day as we Americans dread about pushing their clock forward. This alone should not be the reason to get rid of the whole system together. Arguments that are presented to discontinue the system include keeping the circadian rhythm of Americans, especially teenagers. Even the original intent of helping farmers in now no longer the case as this economic group, in fact, despises the time change according to popularmechanic.com. While this valid point is raised, this alone does not cover the wide range of benefits that daylight savings provide. These benefits include savings in energy, decreased crime rates, and traffic accidents, and most importantly giving us the possibility of enjoying the sunshine when available. Daylight savings gives me the opportunity in the spring to be able to play baseball while having the sun still shining at 7:oo o’clock some evenings. Though saying this I do believe that daylight savings need to be updated. This old system was first invented in 1916 by George Hudson in order to use sunlight more efficiently. Possible other solutions include fixing our current time zones to reflect the sun’s pattern. Another solution to daylight savings according to the New Yorker is to move the time shift in the middle of the following Monday which would in effect lengthen the workday in November and shorten it in the springtime. This shift during the middle of the day would have less of an effect on people’s circadian rhythm and would still utilize daylight hours. While I do believe we need to keep daylight savings, this system needs to be updated in order to be better adapted for not only our society but the modern society that awaits us.

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  • LaToya from Alabama

    Because daylight saving time is a time for relaxing and to save

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  • reagan from North Carolina

    I think the US should not make changes to daylight savings time. Daylight Savings lasts 8 months out of a year, which makes it ridiculous to focus on those 2 days out of 365. It is designed to make life more enjoyable for people since we spend more time awake in the evening than in the mornings. A new paper from the Brookings Institute says “there’s a 7 percent decrease in crime following the shift to DST. In 2007, when DST was extended through November 1 (a decision on which Prerau was an advisor), that drop resulted in an estimated $59 million in savings from robberies not committed”. The answer to this is simple: crimes happen more at night. If daylight is extended, then crimes will decrease. Daylight Savings was originally thought as the major component in energy savings. When daylight is extended, people can rely on the sun for heat and light, instead of burning wood, lighting candles, and using artificial light, which is better for the environment. In the past few years, debates on whether or not Daylight Savings is actually affecting energy use have been conducted. However, a study can’t be accurately conducted because Daylight Savings has been in effect for so long. Another solution Daylight Savings has solved are car and traffic accidents. According to Popular Mechanics, “the net effect of DST on traffic accidents is overwhelmingly positive. In fact, studies actually estimate that we could save about 366 more lives per year if we extended DST all year round. It is, very simply, easier to drive in daylight. Yet the impact of sunlight on driver safety is far more complex than that”. Daylight Savings has also helped industries, one being the tourism industry. Brighter evenings give more time for people to go shopping, restaurants, and other events which boost the economy.

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    • Luis from Texas

      After much consideration, I disagree that the US should make any changes to daylight saving time. Daylight Savings Time is a period of time for 8 months where time is ahead 1 hour and it will be occurring this year from Sunday, March 8 to Sunday, November 1. The whole point of DST is to conserve energy and make use of time. While many people agree with it being changed saying it is outdated, it also decreases crime rates. According to a newspaper from The Brookings Institute, it stated that “there’s a 7 percent decrease in crime following the shift to DST”. Since time is 1 hour ahead of regular time, it will also be later than the sunrise and sunset, so crime will drop for the ones that happen in the night. Daylight Savings Time is wanted year round by many people as a statistic from bestlifeonline.com. The article named “10 Ways Daylight Saving Time Is Good For Your Health” says that “ if DST were adopted year around, the lives of 366 motorists and pedestrians would be saved every year. This study was done in 2004, so by doing the math, from DST 2004 to the one in 2019 (not counting this year since it just began) the lives of 5,490 people would be saved if DST was year- round.
      It is also beneficial as it promotes people to be active and leave their homes. According to an article named “ The Never Ending DST Debate” by timeanddate.com, it stated that “ longer evenings motivate people to get out of the house. The extra hour can be used for outdoor recreation like golf, soccer, basketball, running, etc”. This means that it improves the physical health of people from countries that follow DST. This is because the extra hour can be spent doing something to improve your health like doing a sport or simply taking a walk. The extra hour can be spent being active instead of being at home.

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      After much consideration, I disagree that the US should make any changes to daylight saving time. Daylight Savings Time is a period of time for 8 mont…

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  • Davis from North Carolina

    Every year on the second Sunday in March, daylight savings time turns back on, and we lose an hour of sleep. Then, on the first Sunday in November, we set our clocks backwards and gain an hour of sleep. This daylight savings was implemented during World War 1 as a way to save energy by having longer days with more sunlight. But now more than ever, people are beginning to question daylight savings time and why it may be time to make a change. I believe that daylight savings time should not be changed because it gives people who work 9-5 shifts everyday something to look forward to, and it gives others a little extra something to enjoy during the spring, summer, and early fall.
    Personally, during the spring and early summer, when getting out of baseball after a long day of school, the little extra amount of sunlight I get is the favorite part of my day. It gives me an opportunity to enjoy the last little bit of light with friends or family, before dark creeps up and I have to start homework for the night. I can account for others who do not have extracurriculars after school during daylight savings time, and they enjoy this extra hour or so of daylight as well, as it means time they get to spend outdoors instead of cooped up indoors. Most people see daylight savings time as two days: when it starts and when it finishes. But in reality daylight savings time is an eight month period, where people do not realize how much better daylight savings is and the impact it has on people across the world.
    In conclusion, I believe that the time change at the beginning of March and end of November brings people together, and that daylight savings time should not be changed. Daylight savings time has been in place since World War 1, and I believe that it should stay like this because in reality the people that want to change it are not being affected like they claim to be.

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  • Olivia from North Carolina

    I believe that the United States should not make changes to daylight saving time (DTS). Although it may alter circadian rhythms and can increase the risk of heart attacks, humans can adjust to it as they do any other scenario. Daylight saving time was originally made during WWI and II to conserve energy and make more use of the light during the day. Many countries have adopted this system since then, and should still be continued to this day. The advantages of having daylight saving time outweigh those of having a yearly clock. The benefits of daylight saving time include more sunlight to enjoy in the summer, reduced crime rates, and more electricity saved for lighting. According to the Department of Transportation, “moving the clock forward by an hour saves energy by providing an extra hour of sunlight in the evening, thus reducing the need to use household electricity for lighting.” Most people are less motivated to go to places or be outside when it is dark. Adding an extra hour of daylight in the spring means more time spent outside to play outdoor games, eat out at restaurants with the family, and go shopping. Many studies have found that crime rates decrease due to “springing forward” including murder, robbery, and rape. According to The MIT Press Journals, “the 2007 DST extension resulted in $59 million in annual social cost savings from avoided robberies.” During evening hours which most people know as “5 o’clock” traffic is when most people are on the roads. Having more daylight can lead to fewer accidents involving vehicle-on-pedestrian, whereas if it was dark drivers may not be able to see as well. As it can alter circadian rhythms, exposure to the sun is more beneficial to Americans by putting them in a far better mood.

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    I believe that the United States should not make changes to daylight saving time (DTS). Although it may alter circadian rhythms and can increase the r…

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  • Carson from North Carolina

    The US should not make changes to Daylight Saving Time because it protects people, promotes outdoor activities and business.
    Daylight savings allow for safer driving because, with longer daylight, those who are driving can see better and are more aware of their surroundings, thus decreasing the number of car accidents. Daylight savings also create less driving in the dark, which is when a significant amount of crashes occur. Not only does Daylight Savings Time protect drivers, but it reduces crime. The Journal of Experimental Criminology found that there was a decrease in assault after Daylight Savings Time. This illustrates the safety that Daylight Savings Time brings, which is a great reason why we should not abolish Daylight Savings Time.
    The original purpose of Daylight savings was to use sunlight more efficiently. People can enjoy the sunlight and spend more time outdoors in the evening due to daylight savings. From sports to quality time with family, more sunlight promotes more time outdoors, which is important to many. Without daylight savings time, citizens of the US would have less time to enjoy the weather and outdoor activities that require sunlight. Although not every American values this outdoor time, many can appreciate being able to be outdoors longer. Daylight savings also promotes business. According to a lecturer at Tufts University, Michael Downing, “It’s not just golf—the barbecue industry loves daylight savings, so do the home good stores because people tend to go out of their houses, see that their roofs need replacing and buy more shingles. It’s a really important part of niche marketing for the retail industry.” With more light, people are encouraged to be outside more and experience things. Whether it is from sports to business daylight can provide more time to participate in business and outdoor activities.

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    The US should not make changes to Daylight Saving Time because it protects people, promotes outdoor activities and business.
    Daylight savings allow f…

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  • Ava from North Carolina

    Daylight savings time is a seasonal change when Americans set their clocks forward one hour from standard time during spring, and back again in the fall. I believe that the United States should not make changes to daylight savings time for various reasons. Even though many people believe otherwise, I think that it affects our lives greatly in a different kind of way. In my own opinion, I like daylight savings time because I’m always ready for this type of change, because sometimes you get tired of the days always getting dark earlier or later. Another reason I personally enjoy this system is because we can enjoy our summer time daylight more, because we have light and it makes it feel like summer lasts longer. The cause of this system was to save energy for the soldiers during World War 1, and we can’t say that there aren’t going to be anymore wars, so why shut down the system if it was created for this specific reason? Business Insider says “The interruption can kill people: Incidents of heart attacks, strokes, and fatal car accidents all spike around the start of daylight-saving time each year.”, but it actually seems to be that people will not get in car accidents because people are less likely to be driving in the dark. Also, utlity bills aren’t going to be as expensive, because people don’t use their lights as much in the evening. People say that it affects their health and sleep schedule, but it is not even a long period of time hat you have to adjust to. It may be hard for others to adjust to this, while others have different ways of managing their health because everyone is different, but you will never be able to please each and every person on this world, so what’s the point?

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  • Noah from North Carolina

    Originally, before I read the prompt, I had always thought that daylight savings time was an outdated and disruptive change that we must endure twice every year. For the most part, I was right, but after reviewing the problem further I now understand how this problem is multifaceted and difficult to interpret. On both sides of the argument lie very persuasive evidence that relates to the effect that time change has on human health. Specifically, Sumathi Reddy of the Wall Street Journal argues that daylight savings time disrupts circadian rhythms, whereas Dan Nosowitz of Popular Mechanics notes that daylight savings time gives us a sunnier life. Now, these two sides both reveal much more depth as a disruption of circadian rhythms leads to strokes and heart attacks, and more sunlight contributes to greater mental health. However, upon further research, and in light of recent events, a change in the current daylight savings time would be detrimental to public health. In a 2016 study out of the Georgetown University Medical Center researchers found that sunlight and the resulting vitamin D that is absorbed from sunlight is absolutely vital in boosting the immune system. Georgetown University noted “They specifically found that low levels of blue light, found in sun rays, makes T cells move faster”, which is all too important in a healthy immune system as T cells work to fight off and respond to illness. Now, as we are currently in the middle of a public health crisis in the face of COVID-19, I personally believe that this evidence is especially important as it will help our natural defense against pandemics such as COVID-19. As a nation, we need to do everything we can to protect the safety and welfare of the greater public, and if that means relying on simple solutions such as more sunlight, daylight savings time must not be changed. In conclusion, if we value the greater health of the American people it is important that we keep daylight savings time as it will allow us to receive more sunlight and thus increase our natural immunity.

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  • Ryan from North Carolina

    The US should not get rid of daylight savings time. Why? The real question is why should we. Does anybody honestly care so much about losing one hour of sleep one day each year that they propose changing a century year-old law (Daylight Saving Time)? Sure, the day of the beginning of DST, when we lose an hour of sleep, heart attacks rose by 10 percent. On the other hand when we gained an hour of sleep, heart attacks dropped by 10 percent (Nosowitz, 2020). So when it comes to heart attack what is DST overall effect? Zero. We may lose one hour of sleep with the start of DST, but we also gain an hour at the end of DST. Total amount of sleep lost/gained due to DST? Zero. Opponents of DST cite an increase in workplace and traffic accidents on the day after we lose an hour of sleep. However, due to DST pedestrian deaths dropped by 13 percent in dawn and dusk hours (Buckle). So again what is DST’s impact when it comes to safety? Zero. Let’s recap: DST does not affect the amount of heart attacks, amount of sleep or amount of accidents. Okay, but why should we keep DST, critics ask? DST gives us more time to enjoy the outdoors and all the joys that come with it. By giving us an extra hour of sunlight in the spring, summer, and fall, DST allows us to enjoy the outdoors during the warm weather more fully. Think of all the good memories one might have during the last hour of light in the summer. Catching fireflies or swimming a little bit more in the pool are both experiences we might not have if it weren’t for DST. We have DST to thank for the good memories in the dusk hours of warm weather. Because DST has little to no negative impact there is no need or reason to change it. Because DST allows us to enjoy the outdoors, something we do not do enough of, there is enough reason to keep it.

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    The US should not get rid of daylight savings time. Why? The real question is why should we. Does anybody honestly care so much about losing one hour …

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  • Jackson from North Carolina

    I believe that it is in the best benefit of all American citizens, and importantly protects all American citizens through the continuous use of Daylight Savings Time. There has been a constant debate on this topic since the moment it was put into effect, and will always be a debate. There is a fair argument from both sides of the issue, but in my mind there is only one side of the argument that truthfully makes logical reasoning and considers everyone. In an article on procon.org it lists 3 different pro’s and con’s on the topic. The 1st pro listed, and the only reason that should be necessary to end the debate is that it directly has a positive impact on the safety of every American citizen. How it works, is the longer there is sun out, and the time gets later, the likeliness of crime happening immediately decreases with the increased prevalence of sunlight. Later time, and more sun, means less crime, which means more safety. The 2nd reason given that adds to its resume for having a positive effect is the increased effects on the economy that come with more sunlight. When there is more sunlight out, the amount of free time citizens have when they get off of work extensively increases. The likeliness of them going shopping and purchasing products, and putting money back into the economy increases dramatically. At the current state of our economy, especially with the current effects it is undergoing from the recent outbreak of the Corona Virus, the economy needs every boost, every aid in beginning the process of restoring it that it can get. I think that after the points proven in this essay, it should be clear what choice is the one that has the country’s best interest at heart.

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  • Paige from North Carolina

    I do not think daylight saving time should be changed because there are many more benefits than drawbacks. Some of these benefits include a decrease in traffic accidents, less energy use (so it is much better for the environment), reduction of crime rates, etc. according to Dan Nasowitz with Popular Mechanics. The decrease in traffic accidents is primarily due to more sunlight, and driving in the sun is much safer than driving while it’s dark. The reduction of crime rates is because much more crime happens in the dark, like theft, assault, etc. Although there is not much evidence that supports daylight saving time causes less energy use, it is still backed up by many environmental scientists. But, one of the strangest, but most prominent, reasons that the eight months of daylight saving time actually has to do with the sport of golf. According to WNYC Studios, golf has an economic effect of $70 billion for the United States annually, it has employed more than 2 million people, millions of dollars are given to charity each year, and more. Since golf relies on the sunlight, ending the daylight saving time would reduce the benefits that gold brings in. Although there are tons of advantages to daylight saving time, the disadvantages also need to be addressed. One of the controversies regarding daylight saving time is the increase in stroke and heart attack rates during the week of “spring forward” in March. According to CNN, the stroke rate was 8% higher a few days after the lost hour. According to Reader’s Digest, the heart attack rate averagely goes up 24% the day after. Because of these reasons, many are starting to believe that daylight savings time should no longer be used in the United States as it puts more lives at risk. I do agree that these rates are concerning, but as said before, the benefits greatly outweigh the drawbacks, so I do not think daylight saving time should be changed.

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  • Annie from North Carolina

    In my opinion, the United States should not make changes to daylight savings. In 1966 the United States enacted the Uniform Time Act of 1966 under Lyndon Johnson’s presidency. The purpose of the act was to establish a uniformed time zone for each time zone division. The United States should not change this act because it causes no issues for the average American other than a disturbed schedule for 2 out of the 365 days a year. According to writer Dan Nosowitz, writer for Popular Mechanics, a study was done in 2012 stating that the disturbed schedules caused by daylight savings increased heart attacks by 10 percent. However, this study was proven insufficient by a scientific fact that heart attacks are more likely to occur in early winter and early spring which proves daylight savings does not have any detrimental health factors. According to the WebExhibits organization daylight savings does more good for the country socially and economically. Daylight savings decreases the amount of electricity the average American uses, a 2005 study showed the population of Indiana saved $7 million in electricity. Also, by keeping the daylight savings act the United States is able to participate in more evening activities, spring sports, and much more which helps cities across the nation thrive in their warm seasonal income. By ending the daylight savings act, David Avery, a professor emeritus at the University of Washington School of Medicine’s Department of Psychiatry stated that by taking away this act people who suffer from seasonal depression will be greatly affected by retracting this law. Seasonal depression affects a large population of Americans and through the daylight savings act, this portion of the United States population will not receive the relief needed to heal through daylight savings. With this in mind, the United States should not take away the daylight savings act to help preserve the health of the average American and businesses.

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    In my opinion, the United States should not make changes to daylight savings. In 1966 the United States enacted the Uniform Time Act of 1966 under Lyn…

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  • Owen from North Carolina

    Daylight savings should stay the same in our country. This implementation has very good benefits including safer driving, more light in the wintertime, and a decrease in energy use. Daylight savings increases the amount of light during the winter. Because of the rotation of the earth, the earth is tilted away from the sun during this time causing both colder weather and less sunlight. Daylight savings provide a way for an increase in sunlight during this time. It evenly distributes the sunlight from having a lot in the morning to having more at night. This improves morale and also decreases crime according to the Brookings Institute, which found that there was a 7% decrease in crime following the shift in 2007. It also helps prevent the number of heart attacks. It has been proven that heart attacks are more likely to happen in the cold, dark winter than in the warm, bright summer. The sunlight helps decrease the number of heart attacks because it allows for more sunlight during a time where people are more likely to get a heart attack. During the wintertime, there is less light and that means night comes earlier in the day so there is a higher risk of car accidents. Through daylight savings, it adds more sunlight during this time which makes the road a safer place with the extra hour in the sun. As a driver, I can attest to this statement because driving at night is much harder because of the less lighting and sometimes cars won’t even have their lights on. Most of my friends that have been in a wreck and including me have been at night. Lastly using daylight savings decreases the amount of energy needed to be used. Since the outside is lighter for longer there will be a decrease in the amount of energy needed for lighting, heating, etc. Daylight savings should be used not only for the extra daylight, or the safer roads but because it decreases the energy used.

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    Daylight savings should stay the same in our country. This implementation has very good benefits including safer driving, more light in the wintertime…

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  • Tierney from North Carolina

    Daylight saving was first created as a way to save energy by creating an extra hour of daylight. I think that we should continue using daylight saving for that very same reason. Environmental concerns are an issue now more than ever and if there is an easy way to save energy, I see no reason to stop doing so.

    Even if daylight saving causes only a slight difference in energy consumption, that difference can make an impact. In addition, the twice-a-year reminder to change your clocks is a good opportunity to consider further actions that can be taken to save the environment. Even a small activity in schools that the time change might prompt could further spread awareness of the protection our planet needs. I see that benefit alone to be more than enough reason to switch your clocks. After all, it’s a small change that does little to inconvenience anyone.

    With most of the population relying on their phones so much for everything from reminders about appointments to an alarm in the morning, the risk of oversleeping is drastically reduced. Phones automatically switch the time, preventing any of the mishaps that were once much more of a risk. Even if you still use a standard alarm clock, many reminders have been put in place over the years to keep you on time including helpful reminders on calendars. Such reminders allow for people to plan ahead for the time change and go to sleep earlier if needed to avoid any consequences of losing sleep.

    The only exception I see to the rule of enforcing daylight saving time is when a state is located in such a position that the time change will not affect the amount of sunlight they get. According to Elizabeth Yuko, a writer published in the Reader’s Digest, consistent sunlight, no matter the type of time, is Hawaii’s rationale for choosing to stay on standard time all year. Due to the environmental benefits of daylight saving, I feel that the practice of changing our clock twice-a-year should be continued so long as it is effective.

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    Daylight saving was first created as a way to save energy by creating an extra hour of daylight. I think that we should continue using daylight saving…

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  • Aidan from North Carolina

    I do not think that we should change daylight savings time. Daylight savings time is just a way for us to change the clocks only a bit so that we can enjoy 8 months of the year even more with more sunlight. There are negative effects of daylight savings time like losing an hour of sleep one night but gaining an hour another night. There should be a lot more significant negative effects of daylight savings time for us to consider changing it since it has also been in effect since WWII it’s just tradition now. My Source A also says, “Daylight Saving Time trims the entire country’s electricity usage by a small but significant amount, about one percent each day” and also “So, the rationale was that Daylight Saving Time saves energy for lighting in all seasons of the year” these are only a few benefits of Daylight Savings Time. People like to enjoy evenings and relax and daylight savings time allows that to happen with many other benefits too including a decreased crime rate because of it being daylight longer. India also had a few counties try it and has saved a total of $7 million in electricity costs each year. Daylight savings time also has a positive impact on traffic. Source B states, “In fact, studies actually estimate that we could save about 366 more lives per year if we extended DST all year round.” This would be a very positive impact in my opinion. People who oppose daylight savings time also say that at the beginning of daylight savings time heart attacks rose by 10% but in response it is also true that at the end of daylight savings time heart attacks decrease by 10%.

    Source A: http://www.webexhibits.org/daylightsaving/c.html
    Source B: https://www.popularmechanics.com/science/environment/a18011/in-defense-of-daylight-saving-time/

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  • Sarah from North Carolina

    On the first Sunday of every March, people turn their clocks forward nationwide for what is called Daylight Saving Time (DST). Every year without fail, Americans gripe and complain about losing a mere hour of sleep. While Daylight Saving Time can be difficult because it disrupts sleep schedules and routines, the U.S. should not make changes to the DST policy because there are actually many benefits to tweaking the clocks twice annually.

    The first thing to consider is that Americans spend a significant amount of time in the sun. While people do hate that they will lose an hour of sleep, they love the fact that they will gain an extra hour of sunlight. This hour of sunlight reminds them that summer is not far away and motivates them to spend extra time outdoors, which without a doubt is good for their health. Sunlight gives people more Vitamin D, and offers a greater chance of talking and exercising with other people, which is overall beneficial for their health. Some people argue that health problems rise during the beginning and the end DST because of the disruption of schedules. However, it has been shown that while there is a 10% increase of heart attack during the start of DST, a 10% decrease comes with the end of DST.

    While Americans spend time outdoors, they tend to spend even more of their time working. The typical workday is from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Some people may even work longer hours than these. During Daylight Saving Time, it will stay light outside until around 8 p.m., which allows people to spend time outside after work. If DST was changed, it would be bright in the morning, but it would get dark outside at around 6 p.m. every night. Americans would simply not be motivated to go outside because they would have only a limited time to do so after their working hours.

    Lastly, studies have shown that during Daylight Saving Time, running from March to November, crime rates have dropped significantly. Because daylight hours last longer during these months, crimes are harder to commit. If Daylight Saving Time changed, crime rates would likely increase greatly because of the increased hours of darkness that would come.

    So, as we begin Daylight Saving Time, remember that while we may lose an hour of sleep, we are also gaining extra time in the sun. DST should not be changed in the U.S. as it decreases crime and increases exposure to Vitamin D. Without this policy, things would be very different for all of us.

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  • Phillip from North Carolina

    No, the U.S. should not make changes to daylight savings time because while it may have “harmful effects” on people, there are many others still who need and depend upon the extra sunlight hours in the summer and spring. These “harmful effects”, according to HealthEuropa.eu, are “not one hour twice a year. It’s a misalignment of our biological clocks for eight months of the year. When we talk about Daylight Saving Time and the relationship to light, we are talking about profound impacts on the biological clock, which is a structure rooted in the brain. It impacts brain functions such as energy levels and alertness.” However, according to sleepfoundation.org, adjusting your circadian rhythm can be very easy and can take only 15 minutes to prepare for changes. Some strategies that they advise using include dimming the lights an hour before going to sleep, shifting meal times a day before to match the new schedule, or even going to the gym early in the morning. These strategies make the circadian rhythm change easier and more fluid, causing any changes to be less harmful to the human body. Dimming the lights, for example, mimics the chemical reactions that the body has when in contact with the sun, eliminating the need for direct sunlight to change circadian rhythm. Using strategies like these could make the change last from 2 hours to a week, depending on the amount of light used to adjust and the person’s chemical structure.
    Other people, however, require direct sunlight to improve their emotional well being. According to AmericanFamilyPhysician.org, or AAFP, Seasonal Affective Disorder is found in 10-20 percent of the American population ages 18-30, and the rates increase as people move further north into colder weather and less daylight hours. Getting rid of daylight savings time could seriously affect those 10 million Americans with SAD, reducing the amount of sunlight they need in the mornings (Reader’s Digest). The simple task of adjusting circadian rhythm does not come easy to people with SAD, and daylight savings time greatly benefits a significant amount of people who are actually affected by it. “There’s a big difference between the effects of the one-hour change from standard time to daylight saving time—those effects take place over a day, maybe up to three days—versus daylight saving time itself, which lasts eight months,” says David Prerau, one of the world’s leading experts on daylight savings time. “The fundamental misunderstanding of DST is a result of us Americans (humans, really) being impatient and all too willing to miscalculate the harm of short-term problems over subtle long-term benefits,” he says (Popular Mechanics). This proves that the vast majority of Americans that do not have SAD are not negatively affected by daylight savings time in any way, rather, changing the clocks is just too much work for the lazy people in America.
    In reality, daylight savings time offers more sunlight hours for everyone, which increases Vitamin D and improves health and happiness in all Americans. DST (daylight savings time) also has been proven to be environmentally friendly, as more sunlight can be used as energy instead of using wood or candles. With the extended daylight, crime rates also drop 7 percent, saving any money that would’ve been spent on a trial, lawyers, or even a death penalty. Traffic accidents also decrease during daylight savings time, ultimately saving more lives when there is more daylight to drive (Popular Mechanics). Daylight Savings Time benefits more people than it harms, and in reality, those that are “harmed” are really just too lazy to change a clock. DST saves money, energy, lives, and time, giving more hours of sunlight to the American population.

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    No, the U.S. should not make changes to daylight savings time because while it may have “harmful effects” on people, there are many others still w…

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  • Margaret from Texas

    For two days of the year, time changes. Our clock goes back an hour and forward another. Although a slight change, I believe that the U.S. should keep daylight saving time. Daylight savings not only allows people to get the most out of the day before the sun sets, crime rates go down, and it saves electricity. Brookings Institute found that during the time shift, crime goes down by 7%, with an estimated $246 millions savings from crimes not commited. Since daylight savings allow us to get more done with a natural light source, there is no need to have all the lights powered in at 6pm. A nationwide study conducted by the Department of Energy found a decrease in0.5 percent energy use. When comparing the pro’s and con’s of daylight savings, people have cited an increase of health problems around the time of the switch. A 2012 study showed that there is a 10 percent increase of heart attacks around the time of the spring clock change, but they were also found to decrease by 10 percent at the time of the autumn time change. Overall, I find that there are more benefits to keeping DST than cons, despite finding it an annoying and outdated practice.

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    For two days of the year, time changes. Our clock goes back an hour and forward another. Although a slight change, I believe that the U.S. should keep…

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  • McKyrah from North Carolina

    No, the U.S. should not make any changes to Daylight Savings time because it is unnecessary to argue about two little days in the year in which we change our clocks. The history of Daylight Savings time goes back to WWI when the country wanted to reduce the energy costs. Even today the Department of Transportation states how when we move our clocks up it provides an extra hour for sunlight which eliminates the need to use household electricity for lighting during the evenings. This is so much cheaper and so much better for our environment According to Reader’s Digest, Hawaii was the first state to throw out the Uniform Time Act in 1967 and one year later Arizona followed in their footsteps. If our country really wanted to do away with Daylight Savings then I assume we would have done it a lot earlier to prevent conflict in people’s schedules and daily routines. One of the major consequences of getting rid of Daylights Savings would be how it would affect those with seasonal affective disorder (SAD) due to no sunlight in the morning. Also with the extra hour of sunlight, it can lead to a boost in mental health in which many choose to socialize more and participate in more activities given the extra light in the evenings. Overall having more sunlight in the evening leads to better bonding times with your family, friends and even your pets. Without that extra hour, so many people are gloomy, jobs are going undone and could potentially result in less crime and injury. According to Steve Calandrillo, a law professor at the University of Washington School of Law, more injuries in accidents happen during Twilight hours. Overall taking away the Daylight Savings Time could harm mental health, possible relationships with family and friends and cause more injury or crime in the country.

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    No, the U.S. should not make any changes to Daylight Savings time because it is unnecessary to argue about two little days in the year in which we cha…

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  • Ginger from North Carolina

    The U.S should not make changes to their current system of Daylight Saving. Although many oppose this system, in reality, it affects many aspects of our daily lives for the better. According to Dan Nosowitz’s article from the magazine Popular Mechanics, this tradition began during World War One. The goal was for the extra hours of sunlight to provide the soldiers with more energy to continue fighting for their country for as long as they could. This tradition is seen by many people as a way of honoring the soldiers who fought for our country’s freedom and security during that war. They argue that changing our country’s long-practiced system of Daylight Saving would dishonor the veterans and end the tradition and representation of our country’s roots. Opponents may argue that this system disrupts people’s sleeping schedules and circadian rhythms, or natural schedules of how they live their lives. While this may be true, the effect is not as great as it may seem. Only one hour of sleep is lost once a year, which only affects a few days, if that, of people’s everyday lives. Gaining the extra hour of daylight is worth so much more than losing just one hour of sleep. The change of scenery is also nice, especially for children and adults who enjoy time outdoors. Imagine getting home from work after a long, busy day and wanting to take a break with a nice walk around the neighborhood-in the dark. This turns many people away from time outdoors because they may not feel as comfortable or safe as they would feel in the daytime, especially when their children tag along. According to the Washington Post, some people believe that this time change comes with a variety of health issues, like more frequent heart attacks. However, these theories have been disproven and Daylight Saving Time still remains as the beneficial system it is in the United States today.

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    The U.S should not make changes to their current system of Daylight Saving. Although many oppose this system, in reality, it affects many aspects of o…

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  • James from Arkansas

    Why should we even change anything? 1. Everything is fine as it is there is just about no reason to get rid of daylight saving time. 2. WIth daylight saving time people are able to save money on electric because we are using power less. Unless someone has a really great reason I think that e should not do anything to daylight saving time.

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    Why should we even change anything? 1. Everything is fine as it is there is just about no reason to get rid of daylight saving time. 2. WIth daylight …

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  • Bailey from North Carolina

    No, the U.S. should not make changes to daylight savings time because it provides for a better society mentally. Although daylight savings time affects people’s sleeping schedules, it provides more benefits during the day and allows for better mental health for people. According to an article I read, “Daylight Savings Time Is Actually A Good Thing”, they stated that the National Institutes of Health suggested that vitamin D and increased socializing, which play a part in mental health, come from sunlight and are also improvements to mental health.
    If we changed daylight savings time, we wouldn’t get the proper sunlight needed for our health. If you think about it, we would have sunlight during the prime hours of the day, but as soon as we get ready to go home, the sun has already started to go down. Why would someone enjoy that? Daylight savings time should stay how it is because of this and also it just makes sense. Why would someone want most of their day to be dark? Daylight saving time is highly beneficial and critical to the health of humans physically and mentally.
    Studies have shown that crime rates have dropped significantly due to daylight savings time. There has been a seven percent decrease in crime rates and also has lead to about fifty-nine million dollars in savings from crimes that have not been committed. The decrease in crime rates plays along with the effect daylight savings time has on mental health. Due to the high amount of sunshine, vitamin D, and the benefits that come with daylight savings time, it leads to a happier population and people are no longer in “winter depression”.
    Although daylight savings time could affect people’s sleep schedule, daylight savings time has too many health benefits to discard it. The time someone’s sleep schedule would be messed up for would be about a week compared to an eight month long period of happiness. Daylight savings time is highly beneficial in aiding with mental health and allows people to receive things such as sunlight and vitamin D to help better them physically.

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    No, the U.S. should not make changes to daylight savings time because it provides for a better society mentally. Although daylight savings time affect…

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  • Shannon from Kentucky

    Daylight saving time had many advantages long ago when people wanted to save energy. Although daylight saving time does not allow us to save a substantial amount of money that is spent on energy, allowing people to have more sunlight throughout waking hours brings many benefits. Studies have shown that spending time in the sun, with sunscreen, of course, helps with increasing serotonin levels that decrease depression, skin conditions like eczema, and building strong bones. Having more daylight after people get off work helps people reap these benefits.

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    Daylight saving time had many advantages long ago when people wanted to save energy. Although daylight saving time does not allow us to save a substan…

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  • Roy from Wisconsin

    I have experienced no problems with it, so there is no reason to change it.

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  • Sam from Alabama

    I think that daylight savings time is a great thing. It gives people to opportunity to do more with their day. Although driving to work or school is nice in the daylight, people normally don’t have free time then. They are in the office and or school and are losing time with the daylight. Daylight savings time makes it so those people who work and have school get to enjoy the sunlight for longer. It is nice to be able to go out at 7pm to play and have daylight. When it is 7pm and it is dark, I feel as if I dont have much motivation, but when its 7pm and still bright outside it gives me motivation and I have an urge to use the extra light. Daylight savings time for me is great and I find that I have more motivation when it stays lighter out longer.

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    I think that daylight savings time is a great thing. It gives people to opportunity to do more with their day. Although driving to work or school is n…

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  • Brennan from Kentucky

    I believe that the U.S. should not make changes to daylight savings time due to the fact that it helps us to have sun for a longer period of time into the night in the summer and spring, but having us have more light in the morning in the winter and having less at night. I believe that she should keep it the same due to farmers still partially, for them to be planting and harvesting their crops. We should keep this because we need it to keep our times in check and keeping our days the same.

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    I believe that the U.S. should not make changes to daylight savings time due to the fact that it helps us to have sun for a longer period of time into…

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    • Ethan from Michigan

      I agree with the point that having the DSL allows us to enjoy more time outside and give us more time in the night. I don’t think that the farmers will care as much from the time difference, there is this old saying that farmers rise with the sun and set with the sun. Farmers don’t necessarily care about the time they need to feed animals or manage the farm the animals have a mind of their own and have a regiment schedule.

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      I agree with the point that having the DSL allows us to enjoy more time outside and give us more time in the night. I don’t think that the farmers wi…

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  • McKenna from Florida

    I don’t mind it. It adds a little change in the year. Plus it would be darker earlier and lighter earlier if we did that. We would be loosing precious time in the sun

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    • Casey from Kentucky

      I do not think the US should make any changes. Daylight savings at the most, is a minor inconvenience. I think it gives us something new twice a year to look forward to, especially in the spring. I love having so much sunlight going into the spring and summer and I really like having sunshine that lasts until 8-9 pm. It isn’t a hardship to change our clocks twice a year. Therefore, I think we should keep daylight savings.

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      I do not think the US should make any changes. Daylight savings at the most, is a minor inconvenience. I think it gives us something new twice a year …

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  • Yusra from New Jersey

    I love daylight savings. It lets me enjoy my day throughout the summer and makes me sleep more in winter. Without daylight savings, I’d be wishing the day was longer, and simply waking up earlier is not an option. Our bodies adopt lifestyles according to how we let ourselves live. During summer break, I find myself sleeping anywhere from 1:00 am to 3:00pm (yes, you read that right, I stay up all night and enjoy half of the day till I fall asleep), and the week right before school I’m making adjustments till I successfully wake up at 7am for school. I believe that if we add an hour to our sleeping time, such as daylight savings or school timings, we’ll just adjust to that and wish for another hour delay. We’d just be chasing after our comfort zone and wondering where our days went and why they go by so fast. And our days won’t come back until we let ourselves wake up at the good old 7:00am timings for school and work and our days end at the summer daylight savings times.

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    I love daylight savings. It lets me enjoy my day throughout the summer and makes me sleep more in winter. Without daylight savings, I’d be wishing the…

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