Should Schools Be Allowed to Censor Student Journalists?

In 1988, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Hazelwood School District v. Kuhlmeier that student journalists did not have the same First Amendment protections as professional journalists. Since that ruling, a number of states have passed legislation that allow school administrators to examine student publications and delete content as long as they follow the precedent established in Hazelwood: that the censorship is “reasonably related to legitimate pedagogical concerns.”

Those who support school censoring of student publications have argued that it is necessary for administrators to intervene at times to protect privacy and safety at school. This side argues that some situations, such as an article about a student’s private family life, require the school to get involved to prevent publication and protect said student.

Those who oppose school censoring of student publications have argued that doing so does not adequately prepare young people for the real world of journalism. This side argues that students should be allowed to write and publish material with as little censorship as possible in order to help them understand the responsibilities of being a member of the press.

So, what do you think? Should schools be allowed to censor student journalists? Students can argue Yes, schools should be allowed to censor student journalists; No, schools should not be allowed to censor student journalists; or something in between!

Note: Ideal Think the Vote responses include the following:

-Address the question asked in a thoughtful and meaningful manner

-Use cited facts and constitutional arguments when appropriate to support their answers

-Are expressed in cohesive sentences and is free of distracting spelling, punctuation, and grammatical errors

-They address counter-arguments and opposing concerns in a respectful manner

-They organize their answer in a manner that flows logically and reads clearly

Current Standings:
Yes: 49%
No: 51%
  • Zach from North Carolina

    In 1988, Hazelwood School District vs. Kuhlmier, as ruled by the Supreme Court, stated that school newspapers have not been established as public forums, and as such are held to a “lower standard of First Amendment protection.” The case, stemming from two articles about teenage pregnancy and divorce posted in The Spectrum, the school newspaper run by the journalism class at Hazelwood East High School, was brought to the Supreme Court after demanded removal of the articles that were scheduled to appear in the paper. Censorship of these articles challenged a previous ruling in Tinker vs. Des Moines (1969), which argued that students do not “shed their right to freedom of speech or expression at the school gate.” The question posed as a result of Hazelwood vs. Kuhlmeier is as follows: should schools be allowed to censor student journalists? Although freedom of expression is protected under the First Amendment to the Constitution, student journalists should still be able to be censored by schools if the information poses a concern or disruption to the school itself.

    In journalism, students provide to the school and its students, information that is prominent and timely to the area. Often giving interviews and asking personal questions, the class is based on uncovering the opinions, stories, and events that the school community has to offer. At the same time, the school has a responsibility under the state to protect its students, whether it be in terms of danger, or in the case of Hazelwood vs Kuhlmeier, student identity. The school’s duty to protect its students can cause conflict when articles give distinguishing characteristics, especially on controversial topics or on issues that pose “legitimate pedagogical concerns.” In those cases, the school must take action in order to prevent compromising the safety of the said student.

    While the opposition may argue that the inconsistency of the Supreme Court in ruling cases regarding free speech within schools may serve as a testament to the complicity of the matter, it must be noted that there have been other instances in which it has already been demonstrated that our Constitutional rights are limited while in school.

    In 1986, two years before Hazelwood vs. Kuhlmeier, another court case challenged the initial ideas presented in Tinker vs. Des Moines (1969). Bethel School District No. 403 vs. Fraser determined that students were subject to a form of censorship when the writing was considered disruptive or concerning. The use of concerning, in this case, referred to the lewd speech Fraser gave in front of the school. In Hazelwood vs. Kuhlmeier, however, the concern is located within the articles that posed a concern to the well-being and identities of the students that were mentioned.

    In these instances, where the safety of a student is at risk, or the information delivered poses a threat to pedagogical concerns, it is the right and responsibility of the school to intervene and prevent the printing and distribution of these articles.

    However, in the instances in which no immediate threat is presented, it is not the right of schools to take action against said articles, solely due to disagreement and/or distaste. The opinions and concerns of students today, create the foundations for our future tomorrow, and in no way should schools be allowed to suppress these opinions therein contained.

    Ultimately, the censorship of student journalists should be based entirely on the content within the written piece. Even though schools should be allowed to censor student journalists, they should only be allowed to interfere with the publication of such content only when it presents a threat to the well-being of another student, and not in cases of disagreement on opinion.

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    In 1988, Hazelwood School District vs. Kuhlmier, as ruled by the Supreme Court, stated that school newspapers have not been established as public foru…

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  • Shelby from Virginia

    Yes, schools should be allowed to censor student journalists, because there can be instances where the subject of a student’s writing can be harmful to others and cause them to feel embarrassed. As was mentioned in the New York Times article “Should Schools Be Allowed to Censor Student Newspapers?”, there are situations where student journalists expose people and they should not have the right to publicly shame others, such as the girl who made pornographic videos or the teacher who lost his job due to explicit text messages with a student. Some may argue that censoring student journalists goes against the 1st amendment, but there are limitations to free speech, and purposely defaming someone is one of them. This taken into account, I believe that schools should be able to censor student journalists for the well-being of all of its students.

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    Yes, schools should be allowed to censor student journalists, because there can be instances where the subject of a student’s writing can be harmful t…

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  • Olivia from North Carolina

    When discussing whether or not schools should be able to censor student writing, there are many factors that play a part in this debate. Yes, students should be able to write about their opinions and state how they feel, but in some cases censorship may be needed. This is because student journalists in most cases are working to become professional ones. As students, they should be able to experience and practice expanding their writing and should be able to do so freely. However, there are some instances where the topic of their discussion may need to be censored especially because it is the schools newspaper and not their own.

    In the case, Shenck vs. U.S, the supreme court ruled that freedom of speech could be restricted if it presented a clear and present danger. Due to this, students writing should be censored if their stories present a clear and present danger that would directly harm or insult others specifically. For example, if a student wrote something that was intentionally racist or exposed personal things about someone that could lead to harm or disruption throughout the school, the school/teachers should be able to monitor or censor the writing. Also, if a student writes about someone who stated they preferred to be quoted as anonymous and does not follow their request to be anonymous, that is a situation where the school/teacher should censor that writing.

    However, the decision made in Hazelwood School District v. Kuhlmeier, which stated that “student journalists did not have the same First Amendment protections as professional journalists” is not fair to student journalists because they should have the same rights as everyone else. Although, it is reasonable for teachers to check over the students writing and suggest edits, as long as their writing does not intentionally present harm students should be able to write about whatever they want to.

    In conclusion, schools should be able to censor student journalists writing only when there are clear signs that the writing is intentionally hurtful and could lead to harm disruption.

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    When discussing whether or not schools should be able to censor student writing, there are many factors that play a part in this debate. Yes, students…

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  • Savannah from North Carolina

    In the idea of keeping schools safe and private, schools should be allowed to censor student journalists. Professional journalists have had years of education and experiences with writing for newspapers. They understand the important factors that go into journalism. However, student journalists have not had all of the critical learning points taught to them within their school careers. In Hazelwood School District v. Kuhlmeier, three Missouri student journalists sued their school district because their principal removed articles about divorce and teen pregnancy from their school newspaper. Although these students believed their First Amendment rights were being violated, Justice Byron R. White said that the rights of students in public schools do not always match the rights of adults in other settings. Meaning, the students must stay within school guidelines. If a school does not approve of what is being written by students in the school newspaper, the school should have the right to object to anything that is not within its guidelines. However, as student journalists age, they will experience more events and educational learning points that will eventually lead to careers regarding journalism where writing without restrictions is acceptable. Entering into professional journalism is associated with rights and privileges that student journalists do not have yet. As long as school newspapers are funded by the school, rights of restriction and objection should be given to any member of the school’s staff.

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    In the idea of keeping schools safe and private, schools should be allowed to censor student journalists. Professional journalists have had years of e…

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  • Jack from North Carolina

    Yes, the school should be allowed to censor student journalists. Though over time students have accumulated the right to symbolic speech through Tinker V. Des Moines (Tinker V. Des Moines, 1969), the right to freedom of the press has not yet been given to students.

    In the court case Hazelwood School District V. Kuhlmeier, it was decided that schools have the right to censor speech if it “inconsistent with the shared values of a civilized social order” (Hazelwood School District V. Kuhlmeier, 1988). This case sets the precedent for the fact that high schools have the ability to control or censor what their students put out in the school newspaper as long as it violates “civilized social order.”

    As teachers or administrators have the authority in this situation, student journalists must be sure to know their rights. Teachers are unable to remove certain articles from the school paper just because a student says something that offends them. The article must be “Inconsistent with the shared values of a civilized social order” in order to be censored.

    I think this is best for a couple of reasons. For one, students should have the ability to get their opinions out to their peers through journalism without the threat of being censored for anything that they write. On the flip side, students who are looking to inflame certain people by writing incendiary articles that contain insult after insult, need to be censored in order to preserve the safe learning environment all schools need.

    The censorship of articles that violate “civilized social order” keeps students in check while still allowing them to speak freely. It is the perfect balance for students who are learning to become journalists in the real world.

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    Yes, the school should be allowed to censor student journalists. Though over time students have accumulated the right to symbolic speech through Tinke…

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  • Charlie from North Carolina

    The 1st amendment right of freedom of speech or more specifically freedom of press has been under significant controversy ever since its implementation under the bill of rights in our constitution. The question in this scenario is whether school administrations should be allowed to censor school journalists. This answer to this is not as easy as it seems. Precedents in supreme court rulings have contradicted themselves. The ruling as mentioned in the prompt in Hazelwood vs. Kuhlimier was that student journalists did not have this 1st amendment right since it was a school-sponsored newspaper publication and for the best interest for the students there needs to be censorship rights. Although in the landmark case New York Times vs The United States, the ruling gave preference to the publication company even over the interest of national security when dealing with the pentagon papers. Is teaching and limiting student’s publications at an early age really gonna be a hindrance if, as adults publications aren’t even limited over the importance over national security? My school’s motto states it “will ensure that all students master the skills necessary for success in a rapidly changing world through high expectations, excellence in teaching for learning and a safe, orderly environment”. Publications that students generate for their school can interrupt a safe and orderly environment and go against a school’s priority of providing an excellent education. The answer to if schools should censor student publications needs to involve a middle road. There needs to be certain censorship standards for some agreed-upon controversial topics that students write about although, for others topics, students should be able to express and utilize their first amendment and constitutional right.

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    The 1st amendment right of freedom of speech or more specifically freedom of press has been under significant controversy ever since its implementatio…

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  • Maddie from Montana

    Schools have the right to censor what is being written in a newspaper that is being funded by them. If topics that are inappropriate or potentially harmful towards people in that school, there is no reason why it needs to be published. Students’ First Amendment rights are limited in school for the protection of all students.

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    Schools have the right to censor what is being written in a newspaper that is being funded by them. If topics that are inappropriate or potentially ha…

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  • Samantha from Montana

    Yes, schools should be able to censor school newspapers because it is a part of their curriculum, therefore, they have control over what is published. The students should still have freedom of press, but no rights are absolute, especially in controlled environments such as schools. Yes, they would have the right to publish whatever they wanted in the real world, but school is not the real world, and some topics are not appropriate.

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    Yes, schools should be able to censor school newspapers because it is a part of their curriculum, therefore, they have control over what is published….

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  • Samuel from Montana

    The same is true in the real world of journalism, if you work for a larger organization. What you write is changed by the editors above you. With this being true, the school has an interest in publishing factual articles that will not hurt those involved. This decision limits the freedom of speech on writers in high school, but this does not stop them from having their own private newspaper ran not by the school but actually student ran. As long as the newspaper is operated by the school, the school has the capability to restrict speech.

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    The same is true in the real world of journalism, if you work for a larger organization. What you write is changed by the editors above you. With th…

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  • Lauren from Tennessee

    I believe schools should censor because we’re dealing with students that aren’t mentally developed enough to realize the full effect of what they are releasing in their publications will have on others. I think if it’s proposes harm or disrespect towards anyone or anything, schools should have the ability to take it down. If schools don’t give themselves any power whatsoever, how are we going to keep these kids from writing whatever they want? Especially if it’s disrespectful or offensive in nature?

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    I believe schools should censor because we’re dealing with students that aren’t mentally developed enough to realize the full effect of what they are …

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  • Sarah from Tennessee

    In my opinion, schools should be allowed to censor their students. I see both sides in terms of the students freedom of the press and what they can and can’t talk about without crossing a line. However, I think that giving children the same rights and freedoms as an adult would have is opening them up to being irresponsible. While I do believe that childhood should be used as a tool to grow them into responsible adults, there are many things we don’t let kids do that adults can, solely for safety reasons. The ability to say whatever you want and broadcast it, in my opinion, should be one of them.

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    In my opinion, schools should be allowed to censor their students. I see both sides in terms of the students freedom of the press and what they can an…

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  • Mariah from Idaho

    I think that student journalists should be censored. At least to a certain degree. Obviously we deserve the right to say whatever we want, it is infact one of our constitutional rights. However once our choices affect OTHER people and take away their rights, then it is no longer our right to say whatever we want. Students sometimes don’t think about the consequences of their actions. A student could write about another student’s personal life, without making sure it’s okay with them. When that story goes everywhere it affects many other people and infringes upon others rights. There needs to be some type of system that can catch possible catastrophes before they are released to the public. There should never be so much censorship that a student can’t address problems they see with the school, or their personal opinion about current matters. It is very important to let students have creativity and diverse angles to explore. This helps them grow and also prepares them for the future of journalism. Some might argue that students should be able to write what they want and face the consequences. I would completely agree if they were the only ones facing these consequences. However, their foolish mistakes will almost always affect other people. “Thanks to high school students propensity for mob mentalities, which all too often are manifested in students own self governance of their social interactions, high schools must protect students from the whims of their own social establishment. High school papers cannot, for their sake of their own validity, be allowed to emerge as the voice piece for student feuds, personal agendas, or countless complaints against a system which is ultimately designed to ensure their own development and safety”(Editorial) . Students can influence other students immensely just by writing something that is negative towards school staff and administration. As I saw in my own school last year, it only takes one or two students to put the idea of skipping third hour into everyone’s heads, and before we knew it, half the school walked out. Censoring student journalism is a national issue, not just statewide. “The right to state censorship of high school papers was even confirmed by the Supreme Court in Hazelwood School District v. Kuhlmeier. High school students and their parents expect schools to protect the learning environment and in doing so must surrender certain rights, including the free press”(Editorial). Like mentioned before, parents send their kids to school and expect them to feel safe in the environment. If there is complete free press no one is safe from ridicule and threat. “Finally, journalism classes are for the benefit of students’ education. They are not an open venue for information transfer or sharing” (Editorial). This is also true. Students are being taught journalism skills in school not to write about all the problems they see in people and curriculum. They are being taught skills that they will be able to use later in life and hopefully they will be responsible enough to not abuse those skills. Although most students write many great and insightful things, it is sad to say that we can not truly trust every student. The consequences of just one student creating irreplaceable damage to a single reputation or a whole school is just not worth the risk.

    Works Cited
    “Editorial: Students and Newspapers Benefit from Censorship.” Collegiate Times, 31 Mar. 2004, http://www.collegiatetimes.com/opinion/editorial-students-and-newspapers-benefit-from-censorship/article_66962e1a-e67b-5199-a9c5-87d54b4cba06.html.

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    I think that student journalists should be censored. At least to a certain degree. Obviously we deserve the right to say whatever we want, it is infac…

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  • Jacob from California

    In the event that potentially illegal activity is going on, or school administration is covering up something in need of real coverage, actual journalists and proper law-enforcement authorities can be called. The purpose of student-journalism is career preparation, learning the basics of news reporting and analysis. Exposing and resolving scandal is the job of professionals.

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  • Naomi from Virginia

    Students who are journalists obviously have an opinion and are willing to share it with their school. So why not share it with the rest of the community, too?

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  • Charles from North Carolina

    The rights of the press have been a core value of American democracy since the dawn of the nation, recognized even as far back as a 1735 New York case where publisher John Peter Zenger was acquitted of libel because the words he was publishing were true (Rex v Zenger, 1735). In the adult world, the freedom of the press is a cornerstone of democracy, and in its absence misinformation would throw society into chaos.
    School newspapers, however, do not operate under the same rules as real-world journals, and therefore should be held to a different standard.
    Within a school environment, the circulation of private information, even if that information is true, could be incredibly harmful. Laws exist on the state level for every state that protect the anonymity of minors in criminal cases, and the idea of minors having some level of protection from the consequences of their actions or identities is one that should continue to hold weight within the classroom environment.
    In addition, any information published by a certain school could be seen as a reflection on the values of that school, meaning that schools should be able to monitor the contents of their student-produced newspapers to ensure that the articles published would not be disruptive to a learning environment. The priority of a school should be to ensure the safety and the privacy of its students. With that in mind, it is clear that schools should be able to remove inappropriate articles from its student publications.

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    The rights of the press have been a core value of American democracy since the dawn of the nation, recognized even as far back as a 1735 New York case…

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  • Rebecca from North Carolina

    Despite journalism’s expressive nature, schools should have the jurisdiction to censor student publications in order to protect privacy and prevent harmful language. Although freedom of the press is a basic civil liberty, Hazelwood School District v. Kuhlmeier ruled that school journalists do not have the same first amendment right as professionals, and school officials should be able to censor students if the publication violates “civilized social order.”
    Journalism in schools is predominately meant to be a learning experience, and like any learning experience, it comes with certain restrictions and limitations that may not be parallel to the real-world. In several cases, the Supreme Court has ruled in favor of schools being able to limit students’ rights to ensure safety. The most famous example of this is 1985 New Jersey v. T.L.O in which a student was denied her fourth amendment right of proper search and seizure. School officials suspected that she was carrying illegal substances, and they searched her bag without a search warrant. Although this invasion of privacy would not be tolerated in the real world, the Supreme Court ruled that students in schools have limited freedoms in order to promote the well-being and safety of all the students.
    This case directly aligns with the controversy over whether or not schools should be able to censor student writers and limit their freedom of speech. Ultimately, students have restricted civil liberties when they are on school property, and censorship should be used to protect privacy and safety.

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    Despite journalism’s expressive nature, schools should have the jurisdiction to censor student publications in order to protect privacy and prevent …

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  • Lillian from Iowa

    Yes, schools should be able to censor the content students put out. Not only do their articles reflect on the school but it may be inappropriate or contain bullying/harassment. Some students may have controversial topics that the school may feel uneasy talking about, this could include politics or topics like abortion and suicide. A lot of students use language that may be viewed as inappropriate, and could also discuss inappropriate things. Uncensored articles could be used as an outlet for bullying. A student could discuss another students business without anyone knowing until after the article has been published and read. In some cases, there could be an article written about something that that person didn’t want others to know about, this could be about home life, relationships, or just teen gossip. An uncensored school article should not be allowed to be published because it could end up seriously hurting someone or a group of people.

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    Yes, schools should be able to censor the content students put out. Not only do their articles reflect on the school but it may be inappropriate or co…

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  • Kasey from Virginia

    Though I am a student myself and feel strongly about preserving my First Amendment Right, I cannot deny the need for school censorship in student journalism. Just as profanity and other derogatory messages are inappropriate in the classroom and incur disciplinary actions, I feel that a school-sponsored publication should be subject to the same regulation. I think that administration should be required to be lenient in allowing controversial topics to be discussed and individual voices to be heard, but also given the authority to veto any pieces that are harmful to the student population (i.e. targets/isolates a certain population) or violates an individual’s privacy.

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    Though I am a student myself and feel strongly about preserving my First Amendment Right, I cannot deny the need for school censorship in student jour…

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  • Elijah from North Carolina

    The United States recognizes freedom of press, religion, and speech. Should the freedom of speech be used to verbally assault someone, is it morally acceptable to allow this transgression to go by untouched? Should students be able to publish hate speech, or perhaps be allowed to enlighten peers of the growing pest problem in the cafeteria, or that Mr. Jones wears a wig to cover his male pattern baldness? The Supreme Court ruled in Hazelwood School District vs. Kuhlheimer that all student press must be reviewed to ensure that the content is “pedagogical”, or related to learning or teaching. The concept of unrestricted press in schools could admittedly lead to immature antics, but at the same time could lead to advancing knowledge of the student body by allowing them access to information such as political rivalries, or breakthroughs in various fields, or enlightening them on foreign relations. These articles of information, even though easily accessible by the internet, the student press would allow equal access, as well as enlightening those who may find the subject interesting but never delved into it prior. The student paper allows the student body to experience their peers writing, but that writing has been restrained. The concept of restricting the students paper is simultaneously a contradiction to the rights given to us by the Bill of Rights, and a good restriction to limit childish behavior and encourage the authors to pursue clean and informative stories. The downside is that it quells the creative side to writing, limiting the possibilities for articles and passages to write. In conclusion the student paper should in fact be restricted, but possibly to a lesser degree, allowing students to seek stories, but ensuring that they are appropriate, enlightening, or intriguing for both writer and reader.

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    The United States recognizes freedom of press, religion, and speech. Should the freedom of speech be used to verbally assault someone, is it morally a…

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  • Landon from North Carolina

    School newspapers provide a good opportunity for students to learn the basics of journalism. They also allow students to learn about news that is relevant to them and their school. However, the purpose of school is for students to get an education, so schools should have the right to regulate the information printed in newspapers if it could potentially harm a student or their ability to get an education. For example, printing private information about a student could damage that students reputation or their emotional state should be grounds for censorship because of the potential harm that could be caused. Also, the printing of misinformation should be subject to censorship by schools as well, because it could potentially hinder a students ability to learn. The Supreme Court’s decision in the Hazelwood School District v. Kuhlmeier case did, however, state that if a school paper is a “public forum” the school would have no power of censorship over the publication. In these cases, schools should not be able censor the information printed in school newspapers because students’ freedom of speech cannot be limited in a public setting. Private papers should still be censored, however, because they are published in a school setting.

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    School newspapers provide a good opportunity for students to learn the basics of journalism. They also allow students to learn about news that is rele…

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  • Andrea from Texas

    I believe that schools should censor students on certain things. If a student is making sure that the rest of the student body knows what is going on around their school then it is fine but if that student starts spreading rumors or secrets about others then they should be censored. When being a journalist, your goal is to let others know the truth about important things that are happening around them, not rumors that belong to another person.

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    I believe that schools should censor students on certain things. If a student is making sure that the rest of the student body knows what is going on …

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  • Serenity from Texas

    Yes, I believe that schools should be allowed to censor student journalists because not all news in the school is not school appropriate. For example, a student journalist should not be able to tell other people private information in a newspaper. Nor, they should not be able to use other people’s names when telling big news.

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    Yes, I believe that schools should be allowed to censor student journalists because not all news in the school is not school appropriate. For example,…

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  • Hannah from Texas

    Yes, schools should be allowed to censor student journalist about something that they say or post, even if they are facts about someone and their home life, that is no one business but theirs. Sharing things about people that they may not want people to know can cause them to do things to themselves or hurt themselves also it can cause bullying. Another thing is that is can bring danger to the journalist student, if they share personal things about others that the person didn’t want to be shared that student that the journalist wrote about might try to fight he/she.

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    Yes, schools should be allowed to censor student journalist about something that they say or post, even if they are facts about someone and their home…

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  • Tyler from Virginia

    While there is much debate on whether students should have restrictions on school journalism, a middle ground is possible. High school is the last step before the real world for most students; and in the real world, what people publish is not as closely monitored. So it would be better to allow them to have the ability to learn and mature now in school rather than later in life when it could cost them their job. At the same time these students are not adults and are not fully matured. For this reason what these students are likely to lash out and make mistakes. These mistakes can have severely harmful results on the target of these as well as the writer. A safe middle ground for this issue is to allow students to have the same safety as professional journalists, but add requirements to their publications. The publisher of the school paper should review the paper, ask for sources when the occasion arises, and request the student to add their names for counselors to call upon in the case that the publication is insulting. These restrictions will deter direct bullying while preparing high schoolers for the real world with real world consequences.

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    While there is much debate on whether students should have restrictions on school journalism, a middle ground is possible. High school is the last st…

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  • Adrian from North Carolina

    Students should have a censorship established when it comes to being a member of the school press. There should be regulations towards topics such as the privacy of students, who and how the school is run, and publishing without the person’s consent. Students may not be able to grasp the full concept of the power the media has today. Sure the media helps us in our everyday lives by keeping us updated on the world around us, but if it is not used carefully it can also ruin a person’s life. The school press should just be a stepping stone in their career if they choose to pursue it; just to get a feel for how it works. If an article is being published about the said person and the person did not consent to it. The said person may actually be able to find a way to file a lawsuit against the school because it is the school’s job to keep the privacy of the students. The power of the press is something that should not be taken lightly because it can ruin a person’s/schools reputation. If the members of the press are serious about pursuing journalism they should have an extracurricular class teaching them the importance and the consequences of publishing an article.

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    Students should have a censorship established when it comes to being a member of the school press. There should be regulations towards topics such as …

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  • Garman from Texas

    While I wish it didn’t have to be this way, I agree with the resolution of Hazelwood v. Kuhlmeier and agree that schools should have full right to censor student publishing should they see fit. After reading and going over provided resources, I can see that censorship is in this case, necessary. I believe this because in Hazelwood v. Kuhlmeier, an argument is that since the school is the benefactor sponsoring the paper, they should be able to have the final say in what goes into the paper. Secondly, as long as the school does not abuse their power there should be no issue and if there is, students should be able to post their own content on other domains where the school would have no verdict. The fact is that as long as the school controls the paper, the school should be able to filter as they please.

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    While I wish it didn’t have to be this way, I agree with the resolution of Hazelwood v. Kuhlmeier and agree that schools should have full right to c…

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  • Margaret from Texas

    Ever since the 1988 Supreme Court ruling, there has been controversy about whether schools should be allowed to censor student journalists. In order to keep the peace within the school, I believe that student journalists should be censored, but not to the extent of the cases within the provided sources. In TheWashingtonPost article, “Public schools in Virginia can censor student journalists any time, for any reason. A proposed law would change that”, they mention a case where a journalist was censored for writing an article about the school not punishing students with many tardies. I believe students should be allowed to criticize their schools, as long as they have a just reason for doing so. The school shouldn’t abuse their power. Student journalists should be allowed to report on almost anything as long as they don’t dox a member of the school or have a case of invasion of privacy. I can see the case of student journalists, because I am one, in the case that students’ should be able to have their given rights. In the end, the safety of those of the school are worth far more than a story.

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    Ever since the 1988 Supreme Court ruling, there has been controversy about whether schools should be allowed to censor student journalists. In order t…

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  • Jesus from Texas

    Should schools be able to censor student journalists? I think schools should monitor student journalists because a student sometimes does not think things right, And what they said could make bad publicity to the school. Tus schools could get backlash from parents or random people saying how dare you let your student say something like that.Also if a student says something bad it could create a bad image on them,and as an affect colleges might not want the student. IN conclusion students should be censored if they say something bad so they don’t have a chance to ruin the school’s name and their name.

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    Should schools be able to censor student journalists? I think schools should monitor student journalists because a student sometimes does not think th…

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  • Victor from Texas

    Yes, I believe that schools should be able to censor student journalists. I say this because in the example, Bear Creek High School, they had published a article about a fellow student about making her own pornographic videos. And I believe that schools should be able to censor things like this. I don”t believe its bad for kids t write about sexuality of other things that they are curios about, unless if they do it appropriately. But sometimes some writing in school newspapers might not be that appropriate. Also if students publish things which are not appropriate scandals could occur in the school and people who are innocent can be punishes.

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    Yes, I believe that schools should be able to censor student journalists. I say this because in the example, Bear Creek High School, they had publishe…

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  • Will from North Carolina

    Schools should have the ability to censor student journalists. Student journalists publish articles in newspapers and other types of press that are directly affiliated with the school. Because of this, schools should be able to control what is published under their name. Student journalists also would have too much power if left unchecked to publish articles inciting violence or anything that could harm the school as a whole or any student. In Hazelwood School District v. Kuhlmeier, a Journalism II class published articles in the school newspaper that the school deemed inappropriate, so the articles were removed by the school. The case made it all the way to the Supreme Court where the decision was made that the school newspaper is not a public forum, so the first amendment does not protect student journalists. This decision was made correctly as it is the school’s newspaper and not a common forum solely owned and used by the students. The school newspaper is a privilege of the students provided by the school.
    A counterargument to this belief is that censorship should not be allowed to prepare student journalists for the real world of journalism with real consequences for their actions. Although nothing can prepare a student for a future career than an environment that mirrors the career as closely as possible, the student would not be facing as many consequences for wrongly publishing an article as they would in the real world. The school as a whole would face more consequences than the student because the school itself is responsible for the school newspaper and any article included. For this reason, the school should have the ability to censor a school newspaper as the school is the body responsible for the newspaper instead of any student publisher.

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    Schools should have the ability to censor student journalists. Student journalists publish articles in newspapers and other types of press that are di…

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  • Ryan from North Carolina

    I believe that schools do have the right to censor school sponsored newspapers and agree with the ruling of Hazelwood Sch. Dist. v. Kuhlmeier. For example, I would support a highschool’s right to censor a student’s article criticising another student. This is because in professional media outlets and journalists are held accountable for what they say by the possibility of a libel suit. However, in a high school the majority of students are minors and therefore unable to file suit, which could lead to student journalists purposefully spreading lies and deceit for personal gain with no consequences. Students, while in school do not enjoy the same constitutional rights that they do outside of school. For example, in court case New Jersey v T.L.O., the Supreme Court ruled that public school faculty are, ”subject to the Fourth Amendment but are not required to adhere to the same principles as law enforcement officials” (Calvin, 2018). This shows that schools are allowed to somewhat violate students rights as long as it is “reasonable.” I believe this same principle should apply to school censorship as well. Schools should not be allowed to censor without a reason, they should only be allowed to censor in cases in which are deemed reasonable. I would support a school’s right to censor an article attacking a staff member, but not an article about political issues that might offend a staff member. The Freedom of Speech and Press are God Given rights and are essential a free society, but schools are responsible for information published in their newspapers and therefore should be able to control what is published. Just as a professional media outlet decides what will and will not be published in their outlet, so too should schools be let to decide what is said inside their newspapers.

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    I believe that schools do have the right to censor school sponsored newspapers and agree with the ruling of Hazelwood Sch. Dist. v. Kuhlmeier. For exa…

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  • Jackson from North Carolina

    I believe that United States schools should be able to censor student journalists. The main reason I support this censorship is for safety reasons. Censorship in touchy subjects such as politics or abortion would prevent tensions in schools and not cause any major reparations in journalism programs to keep the students safe. While I do believe censorship in touchy subjects is important, I feel that limited censorship would be the best way to implement censorship in schools in the United States to allow as much creative expression from student journalists as possible. Although I support censorship in student journalists, I can understand why there may be a rebuttal against it. According to the American Association of School Administrators, in 2008, it was reported that the high school juniors and seniors who were involved in journalism scored higher on their ACT. These numbers support that a lot of student journalists are bright students who have a good future ahead of them. Because of the capabilities of these students, some may think that censoring what student journalists may have to say is limiting what these students could achieve. I do see this perspective as a valid argument, but students would only have to exclude a few topics from their writing which would be fairly easy.

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    I believe that United States schools should be able to censor student journalists. The main reason I support this censorship is for safety reasons. Ce…

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  • Brady from Illinois

    Throughout our nation’s history, the First Amendment has been interpreted in many different ways. One Supreme Court case that I have learned about a lot was Tinker v. Des Moines, when the Supreme Court ruled that the students protesting the war by wearing black armbands to school were exercising their constitutional rights.

    While the First Amendment does protect free speech and press, it does not protect threats or obscene language. There is a big difference between a high school newspaper like Eagle Nation Online and the New York Times. If a student wishes to publish material that is in inappropriate, violating a person’s right to privacy, or prejudiced, then that student should be restricted from publishing it.

    However, a school should not be allowed to censor a student journalist for political reasons. That is contrary to what the ruling was in Hazelwood v. Kuhlmeier. It may get a little bit blurry when it comes to the interpretations of the First Amendment and the Supreme Court ruling, but I think our justice system can handle it.

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    Throughout our nation’s history, the First Amendment has been interpreted in many different ways. One Supreme Court case that I have learned about a l…

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  • Mathew from North Carolina

    I believe that Schools should be allowed to censor student journalists because students are usually in a class or a club writing for the school. Students writing for a school newspaper, for example, need to write about things that show off school accomplishments in a positive way. I believe schools should censor what students are writing about because it can reflect the school as a whole. Of course, this comes to a certain extent. A student should not be allowed to write about something inappropriate because that would reflect on the school in a bad way. I do believe a student can believe what he or she chooses to however. The Tinker V. Des Moines set precedent for all future cases regarding students’ restricted freedom of speech. This incident falls under the category of that set precedent therefor journalists should be censored by school faculty. At the end of the day, a school needs to look their best and keep a close eye on what goes on in the school, this includes student journalists. I believe that students should be able to write their thoughts and beliefs in a paper or essay. I also believe that if a student is writing a paper that is going to be published in some way for the school, then the paper should be looked over by faculty.

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    I believe that Schools should be allowed to censor student journalists because students are usually in a class or a club writing for the school. Stude…

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  • Ginger from North Carolina

    Schools should be allowed to censor content from newspapers, but only to a certain extent. In the case of Hazelwood School District v. Kuhlmeier, the Supreme Court ruled that the censoring of school newspapers by school districts did not violate students’ first amendment rights. This is true; however, it would be beneficial for students to understand the concept of professional journalism, and have the experience of just how journalism in the real world actually works. It would be helpful for students to understand that there are real consequences that can result from their actions and use that to their advantage as a learning experience before they graduate. That being said, students oftentimes don’t fully understand the effects and consequences their actions might have when they are so young. That is where the school district should be allowed to step in and regulate what exactly is published in the school newspaper. Schools should be lenient with this policy, however, and allow students the right to freedom of expression as much as possible, without letting the subject matter get too far out of hand. When schools do decide to censor certain content from publication, they should use that moment as an opportunity for a learning experience and explain to students how that specific piece of writing may have negatively impacted another member of the the student body or faculty.

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    Schools should be allowed to censor content from newspapers, but only to a certain extent. In the case of Hazelwood School District v. Kuhlmeier, the …

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  • Angelina from North Carolina

    The topic of restrictions on the press has been argued over for many years, but some of the most overlooked circumstances concern school press and media. Countless debates have been waged over what is allowed to be published under the school name and what isn’t, and although officially schools have the right to restrict what is published, many people still feel that it violates the First Amendment. However, I believe that schools should be allowed to hold some jurisdiction over what is published in that school’s name. The reasons for this are simple: the school administrators have the right to protect the privacy of its members and image if necessary. Take into account the privacy of an individual, if the school press publishes information on a person or people without their consent, then that violates the the Fourth Amendment of the Bill Of Rights which states: “The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.” With this in mind however, I also believe that the school administrators should not step in unless what is being published poses a harmful or unethical threat. I believe that the school press should be allowed the freedom to publish almost any and all content because that is what journalism is: the activity or profession of writing for newspapers, magazines, news websites, or preparing information to be broadcast.

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    The topic of restrictions on the press has been argued over for many years, but some of the most overlooked circumstances concern school press and med…

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  • Harrison from North Carolina

    When posing this question “should schools be allowed to censor student journalists” it is important that we take into account that most of the journalism students in high schools are not going to actually end up being journalists. Another fact that we should take into account is that although journalists are high school the students they right about still share the same rights as every other citizen. Which means that they have the right to privacy. Journalist Tim Sharpe says “The right to privacy refers to the concept that one’s personal information is protected from public scrutiny. U.S. Justice Louis Brandeis called it “the right to be left alone.” To give an example, this would be a journalism student digging into another student’s personal life, and not being stopped. A student journalist could essentially target another student and embarrass them in front of the whole school, without being told to stop. So, the answer to the question is yes, schools should be allowed to censor student journalists, for the reason that it is a violation of other students rights. The claim that the opposing side makes in that these journalists are just being prepared for the realism of media is not exactly effective, because, as stated earlier most of them won’t even grow up to be journalists.

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    When posing this question “should schools be allowed to censor student journalists” it is important that we take into account that most of the jou…

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  • Sami from Iowa

    Schools should be able to censor student journalists to a certain extent. If what the journalist is writing is targeting a certain person or group of people it should not be published because it could be hurtful to that person or people. However, students do have a right to know whats going on in their school districts, even if it isn’t a good thing. They also should be able to express their opinions on controversial topics but not through the school’s media platforms.

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    Schools should be able to censor student journalists to a certain extent. If what the journalist is writing is targeting a certain person or group of …

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  • Jackson from North Carolina

    I think that to a certain extent the schools do have the right to censor students journalists. To become a student journalist in the way this article describes, you must take either the Journalism class if your school has that to offer, or the journalism club. Either way, it is run through the school as an organization/club, or a class. I believe that when a school newspaper is released, all articles are reflected onto the school. If a school doesn’t have a liking for what a student journalist is trying to put out for everyone to see, or finds it too controversial, too offensive, etc, and it has a high potential to cause a disruption throughout the school. Then I believe the school has every right to censor the journalists. It falls under the same category in my mind as freedom of speech and freedom to protest being censored in school. In the Hazelwood School District vs Kuhlmeiner, it set precedent using the reasoning that students journalists aren’t being paid, and are writing under the school’s name. Which therefore means they don’t receive all the freedom a paid, professional journalist would receive. I am personally an advocate for the school newspaper in general, I read them every week, find a lot of things in them very interesting, but I believe in the school’s right to censor them if that is what they feel is necessary to prevent a distraction in school.

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    I think that to a certain extent the schools do have the right to censor students journalists. To become a student journalist in the way this article …

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  • Raven from North Carolina

    The First Amendment clearly states that we as people have the right to our freedom of speech, but when you’re putting someone else’s personal privacy into the public hands then you need some type of border between public exposure and privacy. I do think that schools should be allowed to censor student journalists. Freedom of speech is an important factor in journalism, I truly agree, but just like journalists have their freedom of speech, the people also have their right to their privacy. Students need to be able to be open with their audience and also be able to grab their attention with their news. A good journalist should know how to do these things without having to be persecuted about what is written. With proper guidance an upcoming journalist will understand what not and what to say regarding their articles. Confirmation should be essential. Not just by word of mouth, but on a signed document that can be saved and used if anything goes unplanned. The teacher, of course, should look over the work and make sure all the information is reasonable and maybe go the extra step if pertaining to a person, to let them get an issue of the copy first. It’s not neglecting students of their freedom of speech, though it may see that way if they are not being properly guided, but it’s enlightening their knowledge by showing them how to critique their work and cater to their audience, without overstepping their boundaries. Yes I think that schools should be allowed to censor student journalists. If not then boundaries will continue to be overstepped.

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    The First Amendment clearly states that we as people have the right to our freedom of speech, but when you’re putting someone else’s personal priv…

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  • Maia from Kentucky

    I think that student journalism should absolutely be censored, and the key word in there is student. I think that the writers of these school newspapers are kids and that the schools should try to treat them as such. Kids have a tendency to gossip and make fun of other people, and that is definitely not something that should make it in the school newspaper. In addition to that, they are still children and in being such, they tend not to think before they speak or, in this case, write, and with a teacher, or some kind of adult, reading through their pieces, they could catch a potentially harmful, profane, or dangerous error. Doing this could help to keep the peace in the school and the community, which is exactly what the people in Frazier vs. The Bethel School District were trying to do. That student wrote a campaign speech referencing his friend’s nether regions and the school, fearing that this would spread and grow out of control, suspended him, and they had every right to. The obscenity in his speech was rude, disgusting, and not to mention impolite to the other students. And as far as preparing the students for real world journalism goes, I think we need to remember that we are dealing with kids and they don’t possess a lot of self control. I agree that they need to learn how to be a responsible member of the press, but they can do that without being given the opportunity to hurt others. Censorship is a necessary part of whatever writing one chooses to do, be it a book, an article, or a script.

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    I think that student journalism should absolutely be censored, and the key word in there is student. I think that the writers of these school newspape…

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  • Noah from North Carolina

    I believe that school administrators should have the ability to censor student journalists. Those who stand against school censorship of students cite that to censor students is to deny them of their constitutional rights. Although that fact behind that belief is true and it is explicitly stated in our constitution that journalists must have the freedom to publish anything, I believe this is not a constitutional rights issue. I hold this belief because within a school many constitutional rights do not apply to students. For example, in the 1985 Supreme Court ruling, New Jersey v. T. L. O, it was found that students are not afforded the same rights within schools. In this specific case, It was found that when concerning the fourth constitutional amendment, regarding unlawful searches and seizures, only “reasonable suspicion” is needed to search a student. In contrast, to search a member of the general public “probable cause” is needed to do so. While these two phrasings of the law may seem similar, in a legislative realm they stand to mean that there are different stipulations for searching students as opposed to the general public. This ruling established a precedent that students are not afforded the same constitutional rights as the public. To conclude, school administrators are completely within their rights to censor student journalists, because, within schools, students are not entitled to the same constitutional rights as the general public.

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    I believe that school administrators should have the ability to censor student journalists. Those who stand against school censorship of students cite…

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  • Brady from Kentucky

    Schools should be allowed to censor school newspapers because the Supreme Court case of Bethel vs. Frazier set the precedent that obscene language is not protected by the First Amendment. I believe that this is very reasonable, especially since schools educate young children and obscene and violent material can scar children for life. However, this censorship should not overstep the bounds of obscene material, but instead work to protect the speech protected by the First Amendment, such as in politics and economics. This would immensely aid in the formation of young minds since schools could teach their students how to utilize their rights productively in society, and not as a tool to spread obscene material. Ultimately, Schools should foster an environment to create productive citizens that know both their rights and their bounds in the law. However, this power should not be overused as schools should still adhere to the constitution.

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    Schools should be allowed to censor school newspapers because the Supreme Court case of Bethel vs. Frazier set the precedent that obscene language is …

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  • Drew from Kentucky

    I believe that schools should be able to censor student journalists but in only certain cases. Student journalists should not enjoy the same freedoms as professional ones for a variety of reasons. First of all, they lack the higher education needed to report current issues in a fair and unbiased way. In many cases, although not all, students prove to be too immature to handle the same freedoms as adults in journalism. Evidence of this can be found in the case of Bethel School District V. Frazier. With that said I do not believe it should be at the school’s discretion to censor their own student newspapers. That power should be given to an unbiased mediator.

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    I believe that schools should be able to censor student journalists but in only certain cases. Student journalists should not enjoy the same freedoms …

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  • Aaron from Kentucky

    I believe that schools should have the right to censor student journalists to protect their students’ safety and privacy. Schools should be able to monitor student publications for obscenities, threats against the school, students, etc., bullying, and ignorance of privacy. Allowing schools to monitor and potentially censor student journalists will help to create a safer learning environment for everyone.

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    I believe that schools should have the right to censor student journalists to protect their students’ safety and privacy. Schools should be able to mo…

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  • Sophia from Kentucky

    I believe that schools should have the right to censor student newspapers and journals because the first amendment does not always protect profanity or inappropriate speech. As demonstrated in the Supreme Court case Bethel vs. Fraser, schools do obtain the constitutional right to prevent and limit certain speech if it disrupts the learning environment. Thus, schools may censor student speech, and I believe this should apply to student newspapers as well. This will not only protect the learning environment but by censoring and overseeing the student newspapers, schools can limit the amount of unnecessary information in the papers. It would be great if student newspapers were solely educationally based and positive. But in the case that they are not, schools should have the right to monitor and censor inappropriate material or material that does not promote the school’s ideals.

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    I believe that schools should have the right to censor student newspapers and journals because the first amendment does not always protect profanity o…

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  • Drew from Kentucky

    I think it is necessary to have the ability to censor students. The ability to censor students allows the school to maintain the integrity and values of everyone who attends the school. It is also necessary so the school can protect the students against obscene speech made by other students. If the government can censor citizens for breaking clear and present danger and obscene speech the school should be able to as well. The public school system is a government entity which is why the laws should also apply here. It also helps prepare students for how the law works out in the real world.

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    I think it is necessary to have the ability to censor students. The ability to censor students allows the school to maintain the integrity and values …

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  • Brooke from North Carolina

    I believe that schools should be allowed to censor student journalists. The U.S. Supreme Court case Hazelwood School District v. Kuhlmeier came to the conclusion that students “do not shed their constitutional rights to freedom of speech and expression at the schoolhouse gate.” School officials maintain this right for the purpose of protection and privacy of the student and staff body. Students behind the newspaper hold a substantial amount of power and influence among their peers. What if a student were to publish stories about domestic violence or rape? What if a student were to write about their peers’ involvement with alcohol and vaping? Not that these topics should be ignored, but they could place a student in danger. A school community is much different than the real world. We are cared for, and the administration does what they believe is best for us. I believe that a student journalist should be able to fully express themselves, but not at the discretion of others. It is a safety measure intended for the good of all students. Unless there is good reasoning as to why an article should not be published in the school newspaper, I think a student has the freedom to write about whatever is relative within their community. Schools should only censor material if they have a reasonable, legitimate, and educational reason.

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    I believe that schools should be allowed to censor student journalists. The U.S. Supreme Court case Hazelwood School District v. Kuhlmeier came to the…

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  • Parker from North Carolina

    I think that schools should not censor student journalism because it does not prepare them for the real world of journalism. Look at the case at Naperville Central High School. They had an article about learning disruptions caused by a special needs student. It describes the student losing control of his temper and punching a teacher, giving her a concussion and destroying school property by throwing computers, and even multiple cases of students being late to class due to teachers having to barricade a hallway due to the student causing disruptions,all having eye-witnesses. They describe how they can fix the problem, but the school censored it to the point that it completely changed the tone of the article to make the school look better and make it look like the school couldn’t do anything.
    The school should not be able to censor the school newspaper because it doesn’t prepare the student for the real world of journalism if that is the career that the student wants to pursue. The students should be able to experience something close to real life journalism to see if that is what they want to pursue, not a censored version that doesn’t necessarily show how the real world of journalism is.
    https://splc.org/2019/11/illinois-school-district-censors-student-newspaper-is-it-a-violation-of-the-new-voices-law/

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    I think that schools should not censor student journalism because it does not prepare them for the real world of journalism. Look at the case at Naper…

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  • Morgan from New York

    I think that schools should be allowed to censor student journalists because some kids may put things in the paper that is very inappropriate and should not be said in something like a school paper. Also some kids may have something wrong with another kid and there could be bullying put in the paper about another kid that goes to the school. Some kids could put profanity in the paper that is inappropriate. There could be stuff put in that could offend others. So yes i do think that schools should be allowed to censor student journalists

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    I think that schools should be allowed to censor student journalists because some kids may put things in the paper that is very inappropriate and shou…

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  • Abby from Indiana

    Schools should be allowed to censor student journalists. One reason is, if the journalist is mad at a friend then he/she might put something bad about the friend in the newsletter. Another reason is the kid could put something very inappropriate in the paper, but if schools couldn’t censor it then it would get published. On the other hand, if schools could censor it the newsletter wouldn’t get published. Schools should be allowed to censor student journalists.

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    Schools should be allowed to censor student journalists. One reason is, if the journalist is mad at a friend then he/she might put something bad about…

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  • Abigail from New York

    If a student journalist wrote about vaping and its increasing popularity throughout their school, should they be censored? What if they discussed the terrible conditions of their home life as well as other students that are in the same boat? While many would say these students have a right to be heard, they fail to consider the danger this could possibly put the students and their families in. When done with reasonable and un-bias cause, censorship of a student journalist’s writing is fair and should be permitted.

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    If a student journalist wrote about vaping and its increasing popularity throughout their school, should they be censored? What if they discussed the …

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  • Grady from Kentucky

    I agree that student censorship is necessary. If the student is a part of the larger organization that is the school, then the student has to listen to what the school says. You have to listen to your superiors and that is final. You can say whatever you want as long as it is outside the realm of the school, but if you are writing representing the school, then you follow their rules.

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    I agree that student censorship is necessary. If the student is a part of the larger organization that is the school, then the student has to listen t…

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  • Aiden from Kentucky

    Students are capable of putting some very negative, inappropriate, and controversial statements out into the public. Schools should have the right to censor inappropriate material written by student journalists that is intended to be published in a school sponsored medium. It is important that the school looks out for the good of all its students. This includes blocking material that may provoke other students to the point of anger, or blocking topics inappropriate for younger audiences. If a student journalist wishes to express their ideals and opinions, they should still be allowed to do so, just not in a school sponsored medium. This way, the school is not liable for any unrest caused by the work, and the work is not distributed to young children if it is inappropriate for them.

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    Students are capable of putting some very negative, inappropriate, and controversial statements out into the public. Schools should have the right to …

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  • Ashley from Kentucky

    I think school administrators and systems should be allowed to censor certain things or topics written in their school newspaper. These school administrators have the authority to guide and protect the minds of the other students in their community. These kids in middle school or high school cannot fully thing through or anticipate the consequences of some claims against lifestyles or politics, etc because their brains are not fully developed and they have not experienced the wrath of people’s opinions in teh real world. The mature and experienced teachers and staff should be able to control the paper’s content since it will reflect the school’s opinions and beliefs.

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    I think school administrators and systems should be allowed to censor certain things or topics written in their school newspaper. These school adminis…

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  • Macy from Kentucky

    I believe school administrators should be allowed to censor student journalist. The school journal is put out for anyone to read with the school name on it, so if something caused issues it would reflect on the school. A student whose article was taken down at George Mason High School stated that having a censor would not prepare him for the real career. In my opinion, high school should be censored in order to teach students how to write the news without stirring arguments and actually prepare them more than without a censor. This would also encourage students to focus on certain subjects and learn how to write in different ways.

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    I believe school administrators should be allowed to censor student journalist. The school journal is put out for anyone to read with the school name …

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  • TJ from Kentucky

    Schools should have the power to censor the content of a newspaper that is published through the schools resources. To state it simply, since school newspapers are usually created through resources within the school, the school has the power to censor any of the content within the paper. A facility like a school retains the power to control the content that is produced by the facility or any of its resources. However, a student is able to make an independent newspaper with articles that concern the school and this newspaper should not be censored as long as the newspaper is made without the resources of the school and the creator is liable for the content within.

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    Schools should have the power to censor the content of a newspaper that is published through the schools resources. To state it simply, since school n…

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  • Elhadj from Kentucky

    I believe that schools should be able to censor certain things that are being published on newspaper under the school for it represents the schools image. The image of the school could get hurt and as well as other students feelings. The school should not allow many certain things be published due to the nature of the topic at the time.

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    I believe that schools should be able to censor certain things that are being published on newspaper under the school for it represents the schools im…

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  • Shannon from Kentucky

    I believe schools should be able to censor the school paper publications because the paper is a representation of the school. This idea is seen in the court case of Morse v. Frederick when the school did not agree with the sign Joseph Fredrick during the school day on live television. The students of the school need to follow the rules of the school and since the paper is a school-sanctioned activity. If the newspaper had inappropriate content it reflects directly towards the school and the principle. t

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    I believe schools should be able to censor the school paper publications because the paper is a representation of the school. This idea is seen in the…

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  • Evan from Kentucky

    Yes, but with restrictions. The school or editor should only get involved if it is directly about a student or references a student without his/her consent. In the court case, Morse v. Frederick, the students represented the school in a bad way, and immediate action should be taken by the school. In the court case, Hazelwood School District v. Kuhlmeier, the students did not directly attack or “call out” another student without their consent. This gives the editor of the paper too much power as to what goes on the newspaper and the student little to no power on what they can write about in the school to have people read their stories or articles.

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    Yes, but with restrictions. The school or editor should only get involved if it is directly about a student or references a student without his/her co…

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  • Kelly from Kentucky

    I believe that it is necessary for the school to intervene with the student newspaper because it is under their jurisdiction. The students can make whatever posts and publications they want to outside of the school, but when they publish their opinions on the school’s grounds to its own newspaper, the school has every right to overrule something that they believe to be invalid for the newspaper or something that might upset its readers. The school is liable for whatever comes out it, so the newspaper’s words also exist under this liability.

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    I believe that it is necessary for the school to intervene with the student newspaper because it is under their jurisdiction. The students can make wh…

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  • Nate from Kentucky

    Schools should absolutely censor student journalist because it could allow for students to pick on other students or say mean things about other students. While I understand the argument for an uncensored system due to a “violation” of their first amendment right. However students should be able to feel safe about their personal information getting leaked to the whole school. After all the reason for school is to learn and form connections with people so the need for gossip and rumors formed by student journalist is not needed in the students life.

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    Schools should absolutely censor student journalist because it could allow for students to pick on other students or say mean things about other stude…

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  • Brennan from Kentucky

    I believe that schools should censor school newspaper, due to the fact it is not a public newspaper. It is within the school system and they have the right to allow or not allow certain things. Since school newspaper is sponsored by the school, the school has the right to censor the content for the well-being of others. To help keep topics appropriate for all ages and for everyone involved or maybe just not wanting other students to feel exposed to that or feel offended from the topic. This will help protect certain people for students from being exposed or criticized for certain things done. Such as, Morse v. Frederick, showing a poster saying, “bong for Jesus”, showing that the school has the right to censor school newspaper. This is why I believe that schools have the right to censor school newspapers.

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    I believe that schools should censor school newspaper, due to the fact it is not a public newspaper. It is within the school system and they have the …

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  • Emma from Kentucky

    I feel that schools should be able to sensor whatever information that goes into a school’s newsletter mainly because they are responsible for any hurtful things that come from it. Secondly, it is the schools choose to have a newsletter – it is not required – it is simply a privilege that the school allows the students to participate in. Therefore the school should have optimal authority on what does and what does not go into their newsletter with some liability in subjects and topics of writing.

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    I feel that schools should be able to sensor whatever information that goes into a school’s newsletter mainly because they are responsible for any hur…

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  • Sam from Alabama

    Yes, I think that schools should have the right to monitor what is written in the schools newspaper. If the newspaper has the school’s name on it, and something that is considered harmful and offensive is written in the newspaper it could harm the school and their reputation. Schools should have the right to monitor what is in their newspaper, so therefore they can ensure that their reputation remains clean.

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    Yes, I think that schools should have the right to monitor what is written in the schools newspaper. If the newspaper has the school’s name on it, and…

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  • Allison from Kentucky

    Yes schools should be able to cencore school sanctioned articles. If a student article is published that violates school morals or values then the school should be able to pull the plug on the publication. Students reporters don’t have the full range of knowledge on legal issues and if the paper goes unchecked then the school can land in a whole mess of trouble. Schools are acting as a sort of “second parent” for students as soon as they walk in the building, they feed them, teach them, and keep them safe. Because most of the students at schools don’t surpass the age of 18, the school should have legal authority over them. In the Hazelwood vs. Kuhlmeier case the supreme court justice ruled that the school board had the authority to remove any article they feel unfit to represent the school; with good reason. Protecting freedom of speech is important but if you are representing an organization some things need to be checked. If a child is screaming in a store, the parent has the right to quiet them down. It’s not a matter of the child screaming, but it’s a matter that the parent and child is being misrepresented.

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    Yes schools should be able to cencore school sanctioned articles. If a student article is published that violates school morals or values then the sch…

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  • Jade from Kentucky

    I think that the schools should have some censory of the newspapers but should still give the students their freedom to speak. By giving them the freedom to speak it allows for the school and the students to get a younger generation’s opinion. Although I think that if the content is too vulgar or offensive to certain people then it should be censored. So what the Hazelwood School District v. Kuhlmeier case said about the pregnancy article, I think is wrong. I think it is wrong because this is a very current and relevant issue in our schools today and having real stories and opinions could help prevent it or bring the problem to light. The only thing that would be wrong with it is if the people interviewed names were released without them knowing or if they were forced to give information then the school should censor it. Although every student willingly gave permission to be interviewed and to give their name out. So, in that case, nothing was really done wrong. So I feel that the only reason any student article should be censored is if it doesn’t give relevant helpful information about a touchy subject or if the article was only written to hurt or violate another person.

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    I think that the schools should have some censory of the newspapers but should still give the students their freedom to speak. By giving them the free…

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  • Katie from Kentucky

    I think that school officials should be allowed to censor student journalists in order to protect the integrity of the school and the people involved. If school officials could not censor school newspapers then several issues would arise and students could tarnish the school’s reputation. Without censorship, an angry student could publish a nasty article and get the school into legal trouble. If the school’s name is on the paper or it is a school-affiliated program then the school should have a say in what is being said under their name. Censorship allows the school to protect all the students, without it a student could publish articles that degrade fellow classmates or bring up a controversial topic during a sensitive time period. I believe that censorship is necessary in order to protect the school’s reputation and the safety of all the students.

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    I think that school officials should be allowed to censor student journalists in order to protect the integrity of the school and the people involved….

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  • Halee from Kentucky

    I think that schools should be able to censor certain things that kids say/write about it in school because it can invade the privacy of others who may or may not want to be talked about. In the Hazelwood School District vs. Kuhlmeier case, the kids wrote about teen pregnancy and the effect divorce has on teenage kids. I don’t think that the divorce paper is that big of a deal since lots of couples get divorced today, but the pregnancy shouldn’t have been written on. This invades the privacy of those who are pregnant. If they wanted to be in the paper or not, I don’t think it’s a great idea to write a newspaper on it for everyone to read. I think that somethings need to be spoken on and brought to the attention of people but this is not one of them. I think it is necessary for administrators to put some restrictions on what is appropriate and what isn’t because you are in a school. The administrator’s job is to help and protect the students of the school, therefore, the school must protect the privacy of every student. It is the school’s job to get involved if what is being written and published does not follow the requirements/restrictions the school administrator’s have sent. This can also lead to bullying of students exposed in the articles. There definitely needs to be someone at the school to say what can and can not be published for everyone to see.

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    I think that schools should be able to censor certain things that kids say/write about it in school because it can invade the privacy of others who ma…

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  • Sarah from Indiana

    I do think schools should be able to censor student journalists because students don’t always understand the repercussions that can come with publishing risky topics in a school district. Schools have a responsibility to make sure kids aren’t exposed to things within their district that parents may not want their kids to see or hear about. Student journalists should be able to write about what they want or express their thoughts, however, a school newspaper isn’t the place to do it. If a student writer is that passionate about a controversial topic, they could use social media or create a personal blog to express their feelings toward certain subjects. School newspapers should be kept more neutral because every school district has numerous families who are for or against many things. If students start expressing their view and assert a certain side’s belief, that could offend many students and their families. It is important for an adult to overview the material posted because as maturing young adults, we don’t always see a potential problem or understand the way the article might be viewed. Schools don’t reject certain articles to be mean; they do this to protect their young writers and to help teach them about mutual respect for both sides involved in controversial topics.

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    I do think schools should be able to censor student journalists because students don’t always understand the repercussions that can come with publis…

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  • Logan from Kentucky

    If the article is in a school sponsored or school branded paper or website, the school should have control of the articles posted. In these cases, the articles reflect upon the school and the school is the one who is promoting it, thus they should have jurisdiction over the content inside. Student journalists are free to write articles elsewhere and speak their minds. However in a case where the school pays for the paper and puts its branding on the paper, the school should be able to control what is in that paper.

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    If the article is in a school sponsored or school branded paper or website, the school should have control of the articles posted. In these cases, the…

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  • Katie from Kentucky

    I think that schools should be able to monitor the works of students. If students weren’t being monitored, they could say whatever they want which could reveal personal information about themselves or others. Students are also representing the school in these school newspapers and whatever they say in those, reflects back on the school. Not all things that will be said will be bad and look bad on the school, but why should a school take that chance? Schools should be able to do this for safety reasons and they have these newspapers to allow students who are interested in journalism get an idea of what it is like and also practice their writing skills. The students aren’t getting paid for this job, this is just and extra curricular activity that they wanted to participate in, so they have every right to be censored. Before, they joined the club, I am sure they knew that they would be censored and they can leave at any time. If this was their career, it would be different. However, since they are in a school and they are representing their school, that school should definitely be allowed to monitor the posts, so the school doesn’t end up getting in trouble for a bad post done by a student.

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    I think that schools should be able to monitor the works of students. If students weren’t being monitored, they could say whatever they want which cou…

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  • Abby from Kentucky

    I think that schools should be allowed to censor student journalist for many different reasons. I believe that the school should have ever right to change what a student has written, especially if it is about the school. If a student is writing a journal about something, they could be targeting another student or teacher. If this journal is posted without being censored, it could cause problems within the student or teacher. This could be shown as bullying or targeting another student, which could cause the student to be embarrassed. I believe that every student should be asked if their name can be used because you are talking about them and they might not want people to know. I also think that if the journal is about the school, they should be able to censor it in order to make sure nothing bad is being said about the school. The school should have every right to protect its name and their students.

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    I think that schools should be allowed to censor student journalist for many different reasons. I believe that the school should have ever right to ch…

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  • Kylee from Kentucky

    Yes, the school should be able to censor the school student journalists because without censorship the environment at school can become toxic. Sharing extreme unpopular opinions not only affects the atmosphere at school, but also can create a bullying environment. The reputation of the school could be ruined because they are responsible for these student journalists when they are at school. If the article is associated with a school funded newspaper, all the accountability goes on the school. Therefore, students have the right to share their opinions outside of school, but the schools also have the right to censor publications made in the school.

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    Yes, the school should be able to censor the school student journalists because without censorship the environment at school can become toxic. Sharing…

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  • Cheyenne from Tennessee

    I think that if the Student is writing underneath a school newspaper or some other media, then the school has a right to censor the student. The School’s name is being used, so why wouldn’t the school be able to censor the writing.

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    I think that if the Student is writing underneath a school newspaper or some other media, then the school has a right to censor the student. The Schoo…

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  • Don from Virginia

    When considering this question, it’s important that we understand what “censorship” is, and what “student journalists” are. The position that I will affirm is that schools should have the ability to censor student journalists in limited circumstances, and should have broader power when the student journalism is funded by the school.

    First, censorship is defined by Oxford as “the suppression or prohibition of any parts of books, films, news, etc. that are considered obscene, politically unacceptable, or a threat to security.” Denying schools the ability to censor student journalists at any time would mean that even obscene publications and publications that create a security threat would be permitted.

    Secondly, “student journalist” can refer both to a student who runs an independent publication, or a student taking a journalism class that is run by the school. Students who fund and operate their own independent news publications ought to have significantly broader protections than students who are part of a journalism class. When the government funds a publication, it has the inherent right to dictate what messages it promotes through that publication. This is because the right to free speech does not entail a right to taxpayer funding of that speech, and this view was upheld by the Supreme Court in Rust v. Sullivan (1991). Prohibiting public schools from exercising editorial control over publications created in school-sponsored journalism classes is constitutionally unnecessary and would impede education.

    However, what about when a student decides, of their own accord, to create and distribute their own publication? Public schools are government agencies, and as such, their right to restrict speech is limited by the Constitution. Nevertheless, the right to free speech is not absolute, and does not include distributing obscene material or material that, by its nature, causes an imminent breach of the peace. In the context of a public school, an independent student journalist can and should only be censored if their publications are either obscene or result in a material and substantial disruption to the orderly operation of the school. (Tinker v. Des Moines, 1969).

    Censorship is, in most cases, unconstitutional and dangerous. However, government “self-censorship” through editorial control of taxpayer-funded programs and publications (such as school newspapers) is not unconstitutional, and is necessary to promote a school’s objective of education. Additionally, the right to free speech is not absolute, and should be limited within a public school setting only if the speech is obscene or creates a breach of the peace within the school.

    It is important to note that these standards, based on Supreme Court First Amendment precedent, would not permit schools to censor unpopular or controversial opinions in independent student publications, and would still require viewpoint neutrality. However, because restrictions are necessary and legitimate in limited circumstances, schools should be allowed to censor student journalists.

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    When considering this question, it’s important that we understand what “censorship” is, and what “student journalists” are. The position that I will a…

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    • Javier from North Carolina

      I agree that schools may reserve the right to limit or censor a publication if it causes significant issues within the school; however, overall restrictions on the first amendment should be limited. As you have claimed, censorship is “the suppression or prohibition of any parts of books, films, news, etc. that are considered obscene, politically unacceptable or a threat to security.” However, the issue arises when schools decide to change the scope of what is liable to censorship simply because the administration does not like what is being said. Limits on speech should never be due to reactionary and subjective opinions, rather they should stem from legitimate concerns that the publications in question are too obscene, incite violence, are too provocative, etc.

      To address the next point, Rust v Sullivan was a case regarding both the First and Fifth Amendments and the national government’s role in providing health and family planning services, an issue that is very different from the censorship of the press. However, granting the premise that this case supports the notion that schools should have editorial control over student journalists, it still doesn’t mean that schools should have significant control. As previously stated, if a publication does truly create an issue then the school may step in, as freedom of speech does not equate to freedom of consequences. However, cases such as Tinker v Des Moines and Schenck v the U.S. have set a precedent that students do not forfeit their right to free speech at school and that speech must be a clear and present danger to be limited.

      Finally, I would agree with your assertion that freedom of speech is not absolute, and in the context of a public school, it may certainly be liable to censorship if it meets specific criteria. However, I would be hesitant to give school administrators too much control of journalism, as they may base certain decisions of their own opinions rather than the objectivity needed when looking at certain publications. Again, freedom of speech does not mean freedom of consequence and students that cross a line will certainly be liable to consequences.

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      I agree that schools may reserve the right to limit or censor a publication if it causes significant issues within the school; however, overall restri…

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  • Kayla from North Carolina

    I think that with all due respect, students should have some form of censorship for the material they publish at schools and or academically affiliated institutions. The diction, tone, and overall message of any piece of literature says more than the actual topic may. In many schools, administrators are responsible for students’ safety and the sustainability of their educational environment. Therefore, it is also the responsibility of administrators and or staff to ensure libel, harrassment, racial slurs, or any other inappropriate comments are not included in publications under the ruse of journalism. Like anything else, censorship should have certain limitations, but in order to keep publications as outlets of open discussion and education, administrators must censor within reasonable constraints.

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    I think that with all due respect, students should have some form of censorship for the material they publish at schools and or academically affiliate…

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  • Javier from North Carolina

    Thomas Jefferson once said, “Our liberty depends on the freedom of the press, and that cannot be limited without being lost.” The founding fathers themselves recognized that a free press was an essential component to a free country and thus it was protected under the First Amendment. While at the time this would have mainly applied to professional journalists, these protections must also extend to student journalists. The ability to report on relevant information and cover important stories is crucial in fostering journalistic integrity as well as maintaining our democracy, therefore I will be providing an argument as to why schools should not be allowed to censor student journalists.

    To begin, the case of Hazlewood School District v Kuhlmeier established an understanding that schools had to ability to censor student journalists in certain situations. However, unlike the ruling of Schenck v U.S. which set forth a clear and present danger test for speech, the Hazlewood ruling failed to provide a specific guideline as to what justifies a school’s decision to censor a student journalist’s freedom of speech. The only parameters provided included that speech could be limited if it was “inconsistent with the shared values of a civilized social order,” and educators were not in violation of the First Amendment so long as their actions were “reasonably related to legitimate pedagogical concerns.” These ambiguous criteria equip the school with the ability to extend the scope of what is “inconsistent” as they desire. An example of this would be a 2009 newspaper report in a Chicago high school in which a student covered drug abuse and interviewed a peer that discussed access to drugs on campus. The administration then contrived a policy that barred “anonymous sources,” demonstrating that the extent of a student journalist’s freedom lies upon the subjective interpretation of the school system.

    Secondly, the Supreme Court has ruled on other cases in which freedom of speech was prioritized, such as the ruling of Tinker v Des Moines which established that students do not themselves of their First Amendment rights when entering school. However, censorship of student media also ties into the idea of prior restraint. This is when a government or institution prohibits particular instances of expression, such as a student journalist’s ability to publish a story. The case of Near v Minnesota established a constitutional principle that with very narrow exceptions, an institution may not prohibit a publication in advance. Thus, the burden of proof that a publication would incite violence, spread obscenities, provoke the school, etc., falls upon the institution that wishes to censor a publication. Not only does this precedent provide significant protection for journalists, but it also requires clear and definite evidence that a publication has gone too far be provided by any institution that wishes to limit it. These protections must be extended to student journalists as they must begin to be held to the same standards as they would encounter when pursuing the subject as a professional career.
    Finally, ensuring that nothing obscene or threatening is printed should be the responsibility of the teacher. It is completely reasonable to limit any story that includes any of the aforementioned issues; however, the complications arise when the school system attempts to dictate what falls under these categories based on reactionary opinion. This is why it is the responsibility of the teacher to properly gauge if a story is too obscene, threatening, provocative, etc. Journalistic ethics and integrity are both extremely important when instructing students that are interested in the field, thus any educator in this subject would be familiar with where potential stories fall on the spectrum. Again, if an educator fails to properly assess the appropriateness of a story it is fair for the administration to become involved; however, the overwhelming majority of teachers would certainly be familiar with what types of stories should be published. Furthermore, freedom of speech does not equate to freedom of consequences, therefore students and educators would have to operate under the knowledge that they are subject to consequences if an obscene story is published.

    Student journalists that aspire to one day pursue the field professionally must be given proper and accurate exposure to what the career is like. This would not only begin their journey with a comparable experience to the profession, but it would also cultivate a student body that understands what journalistic ethics and integrity are and the extent to which it is important in the media. Again, it is reasonable to withhold certain publications which may cause significant issues across the school; however, this becomes problematic when the school administrations attempt to censor topics simply because they do not like what they are reading due to their personal opinions and biases. As the Supreme Court has long supported with precedent, the First Amendment should be limited as infrequently as possible and this should certainly apply to student journalists as well. If necessary, perhaps an independent review board comprised of both students and faculty may be created in order to assess any issues a publication may generate. However, students must be able to report as freely and as accurately as possible.

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  • Tierney from North Carolina

    Schools should not be able to censor student journalists. The First Amendment protects individuals’ freedom of speech. Whether or not one is located on a school campus should not be a consideration as to the validity of that Constitutional right unless the safety or education of those nearby is being threatened.

    In 1969, students protested the Vietnam War by wearing armbands to school and were suspended under the premise that the armband had the potential to disturb the learning environment. The resulting court case, Tinker vs. Des Moines, went all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court where it was ruled that, “Students don’t shed their constitutional rights at the school house gates.”

    The likelihood that something as peaceful as wearing armbands would have in any way detracted from the education of those students’ peers is a stretch to say the least. While the Vietnam War was a controversial topic, wearing armbands would have contributed far more to starting a conversation about the beliefs students held than to any disturbance. After all, learning to hold civilized discussion is a skill that will be beneficial to students throughout their lives.

    In the case of student journalists, efforts to limit the scope of their writing only harms them in the long run. Schools have the mission of preparing students for all aspects of life. There is no better way to prepare students than to treat them in an adult manner and teach them to stand up for what they believe in, whether that be through wearing armbands or writing articles.

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    Schools should not be able to censor student journalists. The First Amendment protects individuals’ freedom of speech. Whether or not one is located…

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  • Janie from North Carolina

    I believe that students journalist should be held to the same standards as all other journalists are, meaning that unless a student journalist’s reports pose a present danger or threat to an individual or community, they should not be restricted. In the Supreme court case New York Times v US, this principle was established. This past case ruled that the government could not intervene with the publication of confidential information given to the New York Times because it did not pose a clear threat. This precedent should be upheld in all journalism communities, including those of schools. In the real-world work field, these principles will be applied so it is important we also hold them to the youth so they can grow more responsible, comfortable, and knowledgeable in journalism. These rules will always students to be confident in writing about controversial, serious, or intense topics without feeling threatened of censorship but will also continue to ensure protection of privacy and safety throughout communities.

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    I believe that students journalist should be held to the same standards as all other journalists are, meaning that unless a student journalist’s rep…

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  • Anjalee from North Carolina

    In order to prepare students for the experiences of real-world journalism, schools should not be allowed to censor student journalists. In 1988, Hazelwood School District v. Kuhlmeier ruled that student journalists could not have the same rights as a professional journalist. While this precedent still stands, it does not allow students to have the full experience as a journalist. If restrictions are placed on student journalists, it will be difficult to fully express their opinions and ideas if they have guidelines to adhere to.

    Student newspapers are meant to inform and share stories with the public around them. Giving students non-restricted access to write what is timely and newsworthy allows them to give opinions and news stories that mean the most to the community in their area. This will allow students journalists to understand that what they write truly has an impact on informing and persuading their readers.

    It states in the First Amendment of the Constitution that “Congress shall make no law abridging the freedom of the press and speech.” Student newspapers and journalists should not be restricted to what they say in the newspaper because the Constitution protects their right to write and publish what they believe in. However, some may argue that too much freedom to student journalists will not protect the rights of others in regards to what students will publish. While this may be true that some students may cross the line, there are multiple other writers who will help to edit a rough draft. A story is vetted by many different people and the mistakes in both grammar and content should be fixed before publication.

    In the court case Tinker v Des Moines, the Supreme Court ruled seven to two that students wearing armbands at school to protest the Vietnam War was considered freedom of speech, press, and assembly. This shows that students should be allowed to freely write and publish their opinions without censorship, just as the students of Des Moines were allowed to freely express their opinions by wearing armbands.

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    In order to prepare students for the experiences of real-world journalism, schools should not be allowed to censor student journalists. In 1988, Hazel…

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  • Isabella from North Carolina

    The sole point of journalism is to report the facts and opinions of the ever evolving news and criticisms of this day and age or a historical period/ issue that still holds to be monumental today. In order to write the truth and freely express oneself as a journalist, they have to be able to have full access to their first amendment rights of the press. This is not to say that the government has not instilled limitations on these rights. In the case Schenck v United States (1919), The Supreme Court ruled that Schenck prohibited his Freedom of Speech rights convincing men to resist the draft on pamphlets he was distributing. In short, speech that poses a “clear and present danger” is not protected under the Constitution. So if a newspaper article or yearbook photo were to promote danger or violence, the rights of that journalist would be prohibited, regardless, in both a professional setting and a classroom setting. Since there are already extreme national limitations on the freedom of the press, student journalists should not be any more censored than they already are, and they should have the right to freely express themselves without the interference of the school because it so- called “offends” them.

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  • Sarah from North Carolina

    Many school officials have caused controversy by attempting to limit the speech of many student journalists, some of which write for newspapers unaffiliated with their school. These officials want to protect the reputation of their school and students, and if the newspapers are sponsored and paid for by the school, administrators have every right to do so by limiting the stories that are published. However, journalists who write for independently funded newspapers should not have their speech censored because they are not directly related to the school and need to be prepared for the real journalistic world.

    In the Supreme Court case Hazelwood School District v. Kuhlmeier of 1988, there was a group of Hazelwood East High School students who worked on their school newspaper. Their newspaper was affiliated with and funded by the school. When their principal saw some of the pages, he said they could not be published because he found articles on teen pregnancy and divorce to be “inappropriate.”

    Cathy Kuhlmeier, along with some of her fellow students, took the Hazelwood School District to the U.S. District Court. Kuhlmeier said that refusing to publish the pages of the paper limited their First Amendment right to free speech. The court said that their school district did in fact have the power to take articles out of the newspaper that they didn’t want to be published. Any speech intended for a “public forum” could not be limited, and that since the newspaper was directly affiliated with the school, it was not a “public forum.”

    This proves that if the speech is related to any teaching or educational purpose, it can be limited. However, if the speech is unaffiliated with the school and individually run, schools have no right to censor the stories that are published.

    High school and college journalists who plan to continue into the field of journalism need to have real experiences to report on relevant topics, some of which may not be easy to write, but are still necessary to cover. In the professional world of journalism, prior restraint is the right that the government has to withhold something from being published in national newspapers. This doctrine can only be used in rare cases that will cause extreme danger to the leaders or people of our nation. National newspapers are in no way funded by the government, and that is why the government can only limit the speech if it will cause violence.

    The same should be true for smaller scale school newspapers. Those that are not paid for and not directly related to the school should not have stories withheld from printing. Student journalists deserve a voice and should not be censored, and through this they will gain true experience in the journalism field to take with them in the future.

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  • Alexandra from North Carolina

    The United States, since its formation, has shown an emphasis on freedom. The freedoms presented to citizens are deemed as the most integral parts of the Constitution. The First Amendment — which outlines the freedom of religion, assembly, petition, press, and speech — was not even originally part of the Constitution. It took months and months of debate for the Bill of Rights to be added to the Constitution and ultimately ratified.

    Even after ratification, American men and women have had to continue fighting to keep these rights intact. Because of the sacrifice that has been put forth for these liberties, opening the door to censorship undermines a core principle of the United States. The ability to speak freely, without worry of government displeasure, is as American as hot dogs on the Fourth of July.

    The First Amendment aims to protect citizens from unnecessary government intervention in personal freedoms. Because of the decision in Gitlow v. New York (1925), parts of the First Amendment were incorporated to apply to all states in the United States. State governments are not allowed to infringe on freedom of speech and press because of this case.

    School journalists, as in the case of Hazelwood v. Kuhlmeier (1988), have been told that their speech and publications are limited if it is deemed “inappropriate.” However, public schools and their officials are under the jurisdiction of the state government; they are employees of the state. Thus, schools suppressing speech and press would ultimately undermine free speech that the states and their employees are supposed to uphold.

    However, even though student speech and press should be mostly unregulated, individuals are still responsible to deal with possible consequences. It has been well established that libel, obscenity, and fighting words are not protected forms of speech: prior restraint is only allowed in these extreme circumstances. Even so, Near v. Minnesota (1931) determined that prior restraint is rarely justifiable, meaning that the government cannot stop something from being published.

    The Hazelwood School District, almost 60 years later, did exactly that: stopped students from publishing stories about teen pregnancy and divorce. As an employee of the state government, the principal of Hazelwood East High School disregarded the words of the Constitution. There was little basis and constitutional backing to justify his prior restraint. A story on teen pregnancy does not pose a clear threat by any means.

    In order to determine the constitutionality of certain speech, the clear and present danger test should have been sed, but that still would have shown that the students speech was proper. This test for the safety of speech was developed in response to the case of Schenck v. United States (1919) for yelling fire in public.

    Holistically, the Hazelwood decision failed to address that public schools are government entities that must adhere to the Constitution by not interfering in the press or speech of individuals except for in extreme cases. The decision did not focus on previous precedent and established vague standards with little constitutional backing. Student journalists, in the grand scheme of free speech/press decisions, have every right to be free from censorship.

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  • Olivia from North Carolina

    As citizens of the United States, I believe that schools should not be allowed to censor student journalists. The First Amendment of the Constitution protects “freedom of speech, freedom of religion, freedom of the press, and the right to assemble.” However, certain types of speeches are not as protected such as violence. I think that as long as journalists reference proven facts or clearly state what is otherwise opinion, it is the right of an American citizen, let alone journalists. If the First Amendment is given to all citizens, it should not be limited to places of education. Students are taught to stand up for themselves and express their opinions, but how are they supposed to when it is taken away from them? High school students are taught to follow these rules given in the Constitution, but yet at the same time schools are breaking these rules by censoring student journalists. High school is meant to prepare students for college, the real world. If a student wants to pursue a career in journalism, it is best if schools let them voice their opinions now and write about what they truly believe. If students are forced to write about topics they don’t agree with, it will do them no good in the real world, where people will say whatever they want. What students speak about on the outside should not hinder school property, as long as it does not insight violence.

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  • Destine from Virginia

    I think no because young people know what is going on mainly in the world. Technology has influenced the young populations that they are always watching the news even they don’t realize it. If we censored young journalists, we will not know how young people feel in certain democracies. Also, it is abiding the first amendment, we have the freedom of speech so it is unconstitutional to take that right away.

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    I think no because young people know what is going on mainly in the world. Technology has influenced the young populations that they are always watchi…

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  • Lillian from North Carolina

    Students deserve the right to express their opinions on school matters without fear of the censorship of their ideas. In a school setting, journalism is very important in order to alert the student body and school community about what is occurring in their area. This form of journalism allows students to report on news around the school and express their opinions on matters that concern the students as well as things they may find interesting. This right is protected by the ruling in the Haywood v. Khulmeir Court Case. This set the precedent that student journalists have the same first amendment right as professional journalists as long as it is somewhat related to school. This gives students who are interested in journalism a glimpse into the real world of producing a paper. When the capability to freely express opinions and report the news is hindered by administrators and school officials it taints the experience of these young writers.
    A writer at Plainfield High School in Indiana attempted to write a story concerning the arrest of one of her fellow students due to sexual assault allegations. This story idea was almost immediately shut down by administrators due to the sensitive nature of the story. The student writer then proposed an article revolving around sexual assault prevention but this was also shut down by school administrators. This censorship hindered the voice of this student and her ability to report facts, that were readily available on the news, to her school community. This censorship also hindered her ability to discuss a topic that is of extreme importance to the school community, sexual violence.
    Although it is extremely important to allow students to be able to learn the ways of journalism and express their opinions, when it is in the concern of public safety censorship is an understandable practice that teachers and administrators may have to use. If an article has the potential to directly threaten a minor who attends the school than it is in the best interest of the student to prevent this article from being published. Although this is a form of censorship, it is justifiable because it protects the students of the school from potential harm or danger.

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  • James from Arkansas

    Why should we censor student journalists? It is wrong for us to do this to the students. They should be able to put what they decide is right to put. They do have the “freedom of press” and “freedom of speech” in a way. However, I do believe that they cannot say something that may lead to someone being wrongfully treated etc, and at that point they should not even be called a good journalist. A journalist is someone who can serve other students interest however not just covering one side of the story. The young journalists stories DO matter and they should not have to be censor because they are rightfully telling the truth without being rude.

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    Why should we censor student journalists? It is wrong for us to do this to the students. They should be able to put what they decide is right to put. …

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  • dakota from Tennessee

    I believe that school journalists are highly important for both the teachers and the students. What I think they should be able to write about though is a whole new subject. I think writing about students brings a hug violation onto the schools policy. Spreading news about someone’s privacy for everyone to read isn’t something you should have to worry about in a school. The First Amendment covers the rights of freedom of speech, not freedom of invasion. One is allowed to say what is on their mind, yet the sixth amendment protects someone’s privacy in a way. Although, I am aware of the sixth amendment of being more for court cases, you are still allowed to be aware of the writings going on about you. If a journalist was to be concerned about a student; rather than writing about them for everyone to see, they should speak to the district about it.

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    I believe that school journalists are highly important for both the teachers and the students. What I think they should be able to write about though …

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  • Madi from Montana

    Allowing for schools to censor student writers is a violation of their First Amendment rights, even with the defense of Hazelwood school District v Kuhlmeier. With allowing schools to freely restrict anything that they define not within their ‘educational purpose’, the ambiguous definitions allows for schools to make executive decisions that impair the students’ rights to free press and speech. When the precedent is allowed to remain in the school’s hands, censorship is allowed against these students.
    “Students don’t lose their rights the minute they step through the school gate.” Allowing for the censorship for the ‘betterment’ of the school paper and prevention of discussion of ‘irrelevant’ topics allow the schools greater power to silence school newspapers when they don’t like articles that are being written or investigated.

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  • Cassidy from Montana

    From where I stand, I see both points of view. Since the student writers are writing FOR the school, the school should be able to censor the content, much like an actual publication company.
    On the other hand, those companies have the right to publish whatever they want.
    In my opinion, it is not up to the school to decide what topics the writers want to share. I have learned that some people want more power than what they are given. If this idea is applied to all of the schools across America, not all the the teachers would censor the same. Some teachers might use this idea to limit ideas and speech, based on the thought that students won’t challenge them. The First Amendment protects free speech, and this should stand true in schools, no matter if the schools agree with it or not.
    Why should schools have more power to limit students’ speech?
    Why should students in one school/state get more or less freedoms than every other American student?
    I hold the opinion that age does not make a person’s voice more or less valuable. If an idea is not intelligent, people will discredit or ignore it, but schools should not censor others from hearing it.

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  • Riley from Montana

    Administration should not be allowed to censor a students article for a school paper because high school is to create active citizens in our country. When you restrict a students speech you are not properly preparing them for how the real world is and thus create weak minded individuals.

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  • Dylan from Montana

    Courts have long established that students in school do not have the same rights as other citizens within the community. With this being said, why are students in school not considered their own community? Students elect their peers to a student council that can make policies, so why are school officials restricting the freedom of press if their peers and council allow it? School officials should not be able to ban certain controversial articles if the students of the community do not object. Controversial topics are important for students to discuss and the school should not interfere using their own judgement. Their peers should decide whether the article will disrupt or cause danger.

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    Courts have long established that students in school do not have the same rights as other citizens within the community. With this being said, why are…

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  • John from Montana

    I do not believe students should be censored because they have the right to express their beliefs in the School Newspaper. A school should not be able to block a student’s viewpoint. This would stop the students from learning how to stand up for themselves and state what they believe in.

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    I do not believe students should be censored because they have the right to express their beliefs in the School Newspaper. A school should not be able…

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  • Erin from Montana

    The concept of restricting topics students can write about in a school newspaper, I think, is unconstitutional. If the freedom of the press was as important as it was to the Founders for maintaining the ideals of democracy, then that should be reflected in schools. This is not to say that student journalists should not be held to the same standard as professionals. In cases of obscenity or slander, there should be restriction or punishments. A school acts as its own community, and similarly, students should be able to openly share opinions with their peers and will express their beliefs freely.

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    The concept of restricting topics students can write about in a school newspaper, I think, is unconstitutional. If the freedom of the press was as imp…

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  • Abigail from Virginia

    I believe that to a certain extent, schools should not be allowed to censor student journalists. The exceptions to the first amendment (including “obscenity, fraud, child pornography, speech integral to illegal conduct, speech that incites imminent lawless action, speech that violates intellectual property law, true threats, and commercial speech such as advertising), are all censorable. Like when a cuss word is bleeped out on the radio, words that are offensive to some people should be censored when used in an offensive or demeaning manner. I believe school journalists have a desire for others to truly understand something from the way that they see it, and should be allowed to practice this writing in a professional way. Schools should be able to teach students how to do this in an appropriate way. The readers, should always be open to reading new things and informing themselves about new ideas or concepts, especially those thought by their own peers.

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    I believe that to a certain extent, schools should not be allowed to censor student journalists. The exceptions to the first amendment (including “obs…

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  • Emma from Missouri

    Freedom of speech. We all have to have it no matter what. Situations can be taken to ridiculous extremes without establishing freedom of speech everywhere. Student journalists should be allowed to say whatever they choose to say as an American. If students are allowed to be censored then opinions can easily be taken away from them. When students are given the ability for them to say whatever they please, then that’s when new ideas can be born. No matter what topic it is or how appropriate for students it seems.

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    Freedom of speech. We all have to have it no matter what. Situations can be taken to ridiculous extremes without establishing freedom of speech everyw…

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  • Carter from Idaho

    As part of the U.S. Constitution, the right to free speech and the free press was given to all people. But how young does “all people” start? Does it count if the government technically isn’t the one to do it? I will be exploring both sides of the argument and coming to my conclusion in this paper.
    First off is the ‘against’ side of the argument. The pros of not letting students are as follows: The journalism teacher or school principal and take the story down if it is offensive.
    The negatives of doing this are as follows: if the student is complaining about a problem in the school that needs to be fixed or something that negatively happened to the school, the teacher or principal would be allowed to take it down. Meaning that the problems that the principal doesn’t think of as a problem will not get fixed.
    On the other side is the ‘for’ side of this debate. If students get the freedom to write what they want, they can solve problems by polls. They can talk about more stuff the school may not exactly like.
    These students who get this freedom would maybe abuse it, disrupting the actual learning and talking about topics that demoralize others. Revealing private life, and discriminating against the less popular kids.
    Now let’s look at the things that don’t change one way or another but are still somethings to think about. Professional journalists already get this freedom. If the students don’t get this freedom of the press, does that prepare them for the actual journaling world? Does it teach them not to be intrusive? Even the students writing against student journalists’ free speech are exercising their right to free speech. Most students have a social media account or three. They aren’t restricted there. Someone talking about their favorite music genre, someone talking about D&D, someone talking about their video game not having features the previous games had, even someone as ridiculous as someone who says “I’m just filling up this space with random words. Ball, pew, and soda.” are all using free speech.
    This all boils down to an argument of law vs. chaos. Do we restrict people doing things because they might abuse it at the risk of unhappy people? Or do we let them run free, making them able to do things without restriction at the risk of the few who will abuse their power. This can be applied to almost anything, and the press is no exception.
    I personally think that students should get the right to the free press. They already get that freedom outside of school regulation, so it’s pointless to restrict them anyways. If they don’t, they won’t be able to bring attention to problems in the school. There are some problems that only the youth experience. The adults don’t really care about their previous problems. Therefore, if students are regulated, the problems that the staff refuse to acknowledge would never get fixed. Of course, these are just my thoughts on the matter.

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  • shaydin from Idaho

    Shaydin Raleigh
    Mrs. Stanford
    First amendment paper
    10 October 2019
    When we talk about if school newspapers should be secured by administrators, there’s a lot to think about so many factors play in it. I personally think that it’s in our first amendment right to write what we want to. As long as it doesn’t hurt any other student or teacher.
    If a student is taking a journalism class they most likely want to have this as an actual real life job. So they will need real life experiences, which isn’t why we go to high school to prepare for our careers. I real life you don’t have a adminstarto telling you what to do and what not to do
    In the case, Shenck vs. U.S, the supreme court ruled that freedom of speech could be restricted if it presented a clear and present danger. Due to this, students writing should be censored if their stories present a clear and present danger that would directly harm or insult others specifically. For example, if a student wrote something that was intentionally racist or exposed personal things about someone that could lead to harm or disruption throughout the school, the school/teachers should be able to monitor or censor the writing.

    However the first amendment does not protect you if you impose on another person’s rights. Many school officials have caused controversy by attempting to limit the speech of many student journalists, some of which write for newspapers unaffiliated with their school. These officials want to protect the reputation of their school and students, and if the newspapers are sponsored and paid for by the school, administrators have every right to do so by limiting the stories that are published. However, journalists who write for independently funded newspapers should not have their speech censored because they are not related to the school and need to be prepared for the real journalistic world.
    Think about this, you could be criticized about your own personal website. Being a creator of a web page can open up a ton of creative points of view. However you have to be careful because you can be tried based on your opinion. Joshua Mahaffey knows exactly how that feels, because in 2001 he was suspended from school for a non-school related website. He brought this to court because he felt like this broke his first amendment rights.
    Joshua Mahaffey went to court with Aldrich school, because he had created a website. The website included lists of “movies that rock,” “music I hate,” “music that’s cool,” “people that are cool” and “people I wish would die,”(intext citation). He ended up winning because they could only find substantial evidence. Also there was a mission to not actually kill people. They figured that no one in their right mind would go through with it.
    This applies to high school media, by kids being wrongfully punished for a non academic purpose. The first amendment is a very broad topic. There are so many exceptions made by the government. When we are in school and we have to do a paper on any topic and one of our teachers doesn’t like what we have to say. we are discriminated against or punished for our opinion. I’m not saying that would ever happen here at Madison. However it has happened to other kids at other schools.
    There are rules set in place to protect us, and the first amendment right is probably one of the most important laws. If these laws are broken there has to be a consequence. Schools don’t automatically have the all high mighty right of saying you can’t have this web page when its not school related in the slightest. There has to be some sort of reason why they say you can’t have that or this. This is not just something that happens once in a while there are quite a few cases on this. However the first amendment has been beneficial for very many people all over the world. I wonder what would happen if there was no first amendment at all?

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    Shaydin Raleigh
    Mrs. Stanford
    First amendment paper
    10 October 2019
    When we talk about if school newspapers should be secured by administrator…

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  • Kari from Idaho

    I think that schools should not censor student journalism because it’s taking away their first amendment right. Once a high school student takes a government class and even before going into high school they have learned all about the amendments especially the first amendment. The first amendment is freedom of speech, religion, assembly, press, and petition. One of the biggest things about being a reporter is to be able to express and tell the truth while writing your next story. “As reporters for student-run newspapers, student journalists take on the responsibility of informing the campus community about what’s going, whether it’s the results of the latest basketball game, the success of a recent fundraiser or something more controversial like misused funds by the administration”(“Should Schools Be Allowed to Censor Their Student Newspapers?” Study.com). You don’t want to read the news that doesn’t have the full truth or misses over stuff because they were censored. When writing a paper while being on a journalist team or newspaper team always has to write what happens if not it would be false news and censoring the students could lead to false news because they would maybe have to leave out important stuff or possibly have had a teacher taken away what really happens for that story to start and end. Not only would you be teaching the students that it’s okay to get rid of some of the real world things you would also be teaching them that you can take away their first amendment right. The reason why teachers would be teaching student that its okay to take away what happens in the world is because they are censoring the story from its true capability and what really happened if something dangerous happened but the teacher said it’s not school appropriate it’s taking students away from knowing what happened or what can happen to them. And the other one about taking away the first amendment right is because they are teaching that what they have learned every year of history or social studies can just be thrown away because of what one teacher says or what the school administration says. Yes, there are some things that should be taken into account especially if the school district has stated that it is not appropriate for these things to be in the story. “Censorship issues can be avoided when the journalism teacher or other advisor and the newspaper staff develop a close working relationship with administrators. School culture also improves when students know they can express themselves”(Zalaznick, Matt. “Why Freedom of the Press Should Extend to School Newspapers.” District Administration, 16 Oct. 2019). It’s not easy to express yourself when you write stories about your school or other people, and when teachers take advantage of your story and take away the meaning of the story and censoring it so it’s “appropriate” to the school but it’s not appropriate taking away students work that they feel the school should know about. This is why we should not allow schools to censor journalism or newspapers.

    Work cited

    “Should Schools Be Allowed to Censor Their Student Newspapers?” Study.com, Study.com, study.com/articles/Should_Schools_Be_Allowed_to_Censor_Their_Student_Newspapers.html.

    Zalaznick, Matt. “Why Freedom of the Press Should Extend to School Newspapers.” District Administration, 16 Oct. 2019, districtadministration.com/extend-freedom-of-press-in-school-to-newspapers/.

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    I think that schools should not censor student journalism because it’s taking away their first amendment right. Once a high school student takes a gov…

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  • Jonathan from Virginia

    Schools should not be allowed to censor student journalists. The first amendment states that every citizen of the united states has the right to freedom of speech. How can an institution deny that right to anyone. Sure there is limits to this right but these limits should only apply to hate and fear, not the truth. If a student finds that a story must be told it should be published with two teachers approval and a principal’s signature. If the principal is to veto the paper then just like government there has to be an option to override the veto. maybe two more teachers have to say yes. No matter what device you use to override the veto the point is that there is an override mechanism. We must have that there to prevent injustices from taking place and infringing on students rights. lets pass legislation just like virginia is trying to due and protect these future journalists.

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    Schools should not be allowed to censor student journalists. The first amendment states that every citizen of the united states has the right to freed…

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  • Julia from New Jersey

    If a student in the classroom or somewhere around the world is reporting on an issue close to their heart, schools shouldn’t censor an editorial reporting on events taking place in our society today. The journalism only serves to help further educate students on daily events and the current state of affairs. If a school or teacher censors what they deem ‘inappropriate’ it only serves as a hindrance to the future of our country and the well being of the student.

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    If a student in the classroom or somewhere around the world is reporting on an issue close to their heart, schools shouldn’t censor an editorial repor…

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  • Jordan from Virginia

    The debate over whether school systems should censor student journalism is not only an important step in unveiling the ramifications – and limitations – of democracy but to correctly allocate “freedom” to its rightful domain. Freedom is not, or should not, be a word thrown out lightly. It represents the building blocks and foundation of this nation and its mere presence is the reason for this conversation. To ask if students should have the right to express their very freedoms is no different than asking if they are American citizens. They should, without a doubt, be able to journalize important and relevant issues to not only them but their fellow classmates. The influx of newsworthy information throughout a school system would not only enlighten a student and rid his or her mind of ignorance (depending on the political topics of course) but help them become more socially aware of current issues that affect them in there environment and in the outside world. Giving students the platform to express their deepest concerns would also prepare them for the outside world and possibly help them determine a future career choice. That being said, this is not a simple yes or no question. Its importance begs the question of the “stature” of freedom and if students should have the same extent of freedoms as adults. One of the many functions of a school system is to educate – not in the literal grading aspect of education – students on their path and journey as citizens of a democratic nation. Most students are not intellectually ready for the endeavors of the world and must be trained to grasp a better knowledge of it. This means that their range of freedom should be limited to a certain extent until they are ready for the challenges of the world. So while I completely believe students should have the right to journalize their thoughts and views, I believe there should be some regulations on what should be publicized to the school system.

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  • Jared from Idaho

    In this modern age our 1st amendment rights apply no matter what the circumstance; whether that be in court or in school newspapers. Why should professional writers be allowed freedom of speech but not students? Students and children in this case are allowed just as much freedom as the Washington Post.
    For this question I vote no. No is the correct answer because students should be allowed to say what they want. For example, “If the First Amendment means anything, it means that a state has no business telling a man, sitting alone in his house, what books he may read or what films he may watch,” (First Amendment Quotes). Which means that school administrators or anyone for that matter are not allowed to tell students what they can and cannot say.
    We should not be controlled in what we say because we exercise our first amendment rights. Professional journalists are allowed to say whatever they want about Obama which relates to us because we should be able to say what we want about let’s say our superintendent for example, “In the case of the Obama poster, I was just exercising my First Amendment rights – and my free speech is exercised visually. People who want to talk or write in order to share an opinion about Obama can do that, but when I want to say what I think about him, I need to make a portrait,” (First Amendment Quotes).
    The first amendment should always apply no matter race, ethnicity, religion, or practices. For instance, “The First Amendment defends all forms of speech including hate speech, which is why groups like Ku Klux Klan are allowed to utter their poisonous remarks,” (First Amendment Quotes). People may have different opinions on whether the KKK is good or bad but nonetheless they are still allowed to exercise freedom of speech because it applies to EVERYONE.
    On one hand there are a ton of reasons why we should be allowed to exercise freedom of speech. On the other hand first amendment rights can be abused if you are rich or have friends in high places. To illustrate, “But I know newspapers. They have the first amendment and they can tell any lie knowing it’s a lie and they’re protected if the person’s famous or it’s a company,” (First Amendment Quotes). Therefore news sources like CNN are able to twist people’s words like President Trump’s words. In one instance leading up to Trump’s acquittal CNN was twisting what the truthful reports said and making things up to make him look bad.
    The first amendment doesn’t make it ok to commit a crime namely, when the secret service agencies were trying to find crimes that Hillary and Bill clinton supposedly committed the people that gave us dirt on wikileaks were found dead the next day and the cops said they killed themselves, but the way they died made it impossible for them to kill themselves. For example, one of the guys that leaked stuff supposedly stabbed himself in the heart which is impossible to do unless you were to attach a knife to a board and attach it to a wall, but that still makes the chances of you hitting your heart very slim. “WikiLeaks’ disclosures should be protected under the First Amendment,” (First Amendment Quotes).
    Finally it may be concluded that school officials should not be allowed to control what students say, because it would be a violation of their first amendment rights. If students are controlled with what they have to say then so should all of America.

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  • Jackson from North Carolina

    The application of the Bill of Rights to students is an issue that has been debated in countless Supreme Court cases. Tinker v. Des Moines and Engle v. Vitale are some of the most notable decisions, and still we are left with no clear answer on the question of: can students lose some rights while on school grounds? Since the 1988 Supreme Court Case Hazelwood v. Kuhlmeier, the question of student journalist censorship has been debated over. The case stated that students don’t have the exact same first amendment rights while inside a school, which harms the growth of student journalists.

    In the case Near v. Minnesota, the Supreme Court ruled that prior restraint, or censorship, of the paper was unconstitutional except in extremely limited national security issues. So why if professional journalists aren’t subject to censorship except in extremely limited cases, should students be subject to this censorship? Students should not lose Constitutional rights just because they step foot on a campus, but things like the national security issue limiter in the case Near v. Minnesota should be placed on a smaller scale. That smaller scale would allow for censorship on things that could initiate violence, not censorship because a school administrator or teacher got their feelings hurt. It is the responsibility of the press to inform the public and keep those in power in-check. If those in power can shut down anything they want, that destroys the fundamental role the press plays.

    Not only does the press keep those in power in check, but the press has to keep themselves in line as well. Being a student journalist, a big part of my job is to maintain the integrity of our paper and allow for those reading the paper to have the highest regard for what we do. It is the collective responsibility of the entire staff to make sure that we maintain high regard amongst everyone who reads our paper. This high regard is the single most important thing in having a successful student publication. Without high respect, no one would want to do an interview with us, read the paper, or most importantly buy an ad from us so we can pay to get the paper printed. If there is something in our paper that would violate the president that has been set in the case Near v Minnesota, our publications integrity, dignity, and respect would be lost and with it, so would our paper. Un-checked censorship to schools papers damages the whole point of that collective responsibility and truly should not be applied to student journalists.

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    The application of the Bill of Rights to students is an issue that has been debated in countless Supreme Court cases. Tinker v. Des Moines and Engle v…

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  • Forbes from North Carolina

    I believe that students should not be censored by their schools. Students are going through their last years of high school, which means the next step is college. In college you don’t typically have parents to do everything for you. Things like waking you up for school so you are on time, and making your breakfast and lunch. This is where responsibility comes in, students need to be taught to be prepared for the beginning of their adult life. If the schools watch over the students they would be taking away that opportunity away from them. Not only should students be well rehearsed but they also have something called peer editing. Peer editing is a way for the more experienced writers who have taken the class to read and comment on each others writing. Not only are these students more than capable of being responsible, they also have the right of the freedom of press. This means the school is violating the first amendment of the constitution. In conclusion the students should be allowed to express their feelings and opinions on certain things.

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    I believe that students should not be censored by their schools. Students are going through their last years of high school, which means the next step…

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  • Emily from North Carolina

    In the 1988 Supreme Court case Hazelwood School District v. Kuhlmeier, a group of Journalism II students wrote two stories detailing some of their peer’s experiences with teen pregnancy and divorced families for their school newspaper. Their principal, upon reading the proofs of the upcoming issue, found the two articles to be “inappropriate,” and demanded they be withheld from publication.

    Discontent with this decision, the student journalists, with the help of the ACLU, sued. After years of battling the school board in court, the Supreme Court finally came to a decision: Educators have the right to refuse to sponsor speech if it is “inconsistent with the shared values of a civilized social order,” furthering the limitations on students’ First Amendment rights on school grounds.

    I, however, believe that this ruling is outdated. While there are indeed some circumstances where a student journalist’s first amendment rights may be revoked, those regulations should align with those put in place for journalists in the working world. Students deserve to express their full opinions in school-sponsored media, without fear of censorship.

    Last year, I, as a writer and editor for my own high school newspaper, covered a story on teen parents. In writing the article, I not only gained a new insight into a population of individuals who many of us often unfairly disregard, but I was also able to share this newfound perspective with my peers. Teen pregnancy, drunk driving, suicide, sexuality, and drugs are all real and prevalent topics within high school communities that deserve to be addressed by students for students, without administrative regulation.

    As of current, 14 states have passed “New Voices” bills which have extended the rights of student journalists, clarifying the limits of the 1988 Hazelwood School District v. Kuhlmeier decision. According to the Illinois HB5902 (one of the 14 “New Voice Bills”), student journalists have the right to “exercise freedom of speech and of the press in school-sponsored media.”

    These bills, however, have not alloted students an unlimited amount of liberty. While high school journalists are treated with the same respect that is given to professional journalists, they are still required to uphold journalistic ethics. This “New Voices” legislation does not protect libelous, obscene, or invasive works that lead to unlawful and substantial violations of school operations.

    Schools need to be preparing their students for life after graduation. Without fear of censorship, teenage writers and readers alike will have an incredible opportunity to gain new and valued insight within the pages of a high school newspaper.

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    In the 1988 Supreme Court case Hazelwood School District v. Kuhlmeier, a group of Journalism II students wrote two stories detailing some of their pee…

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  • Perrin from North Carolina

    Schools should not be allowed to censor student journalists because suppressing journalist is a violation of “ the press”. The first amendment states, “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances.” With no regards to this, states have introduced and passed legislation limiting student journalists.

    “A number of states have passed legislation that allow school administrators to examine student publications and delete content as long as they follow the precedent established in Hazelwood: that the censorship is “reasonably related to legitimate pedagogical concerns.”

    One reason why schools have allowed for censorship of articles is to protect student privacy. These censorships could potentially assure confidentiality of students and faculty. Another reason for school restriction is to ensure safety at school.

    “This side (people who agree with censorship) argues that some situations, such as an article about a student’s private family life, require the school to get involved to prevent publication and protect said student.”

    However, states have passed legislation which has neglected the First Amendment. These laws make it hard for young writers to understand what it means to be a journalist. Because of this, students are unable to learn valuable lessons that could lead to missteps in the future.

    “Students should be allowed to write and publish material with as little censorship as possible in order to help them understand the responsibilities of being a member of the press.”

    In all, students must be allowed to express themselves. This will lead to a more informed group of young journalists. This will also allow journalists to learn the responsibilities that come with writing.

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    Schools should not be allowed to censor student journalists because suppressing journalist is a violation of “ the press”. The first amendment st…

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  • Ashley from North Carolina

    In the Hazelwood School District v. Kuhlmeier case, it was ruled that student journalists did not have the same First Amendment right that professional journalists had. The First Amendment grants freedom of speech, religion, and press to all. If we start to take away that right granted to us, where does it end? What else will be taken away from us as students, and as people? I agree that administrators need to protect privacy and safety at school, but at the same time, they do not have the right to censor students stating the facts and their opinions. Journalism, to most of these students, is the only way that they can express their feelings and views on particular topics. Why should students have this outlet taken away from them? Once you take away the right for these students to express their opinion they will start to think everything they share has to be approved by someone first. Taking away that noncensored form of publication prepares students for the real world of journalism. When these students go off into the Journalism career there is no form of censorship in their writing. Going through high school not practicing that, won’t properly prepare them by giving them any form of experience, or knowledge about that aspect of the career. I ask you this question again: by taking away the First Amendment right, where does it end? What will be taken away from these students next?

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    In the Hazelwood School District v. Kuhlmeier case, it was ruled that student journalists did not have the same First Amendment right that professiona…

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  • Jack from North Carolina

    In high school or middle school journalism, the school should not be able to silence the author’s free speech, even if it offends people or talks bad about the school system. If the school would silence the author’s opinion it would be a violation of their 1st amendment right, the right of free speech, free press, etc.
    The public school system should not be able to regulate the school newspaper because it would only point out the good things about the school and no advances would be made. For example, in the United States, there is a free speech system called the first amendment. This allows people to say whatever they want regardless of what the content is. With this amendment, the public could call out the government if they are doing something wrong. In certain places like China, these types of things wouldn’t happen because they arrest people that speak out against the government. Now put that into perspective for a school. If the journalist working on the school newspaper was not allowed to call out certain teachers or bad policies in the school, nothing would change and those bad policies would still be there.
    An argument against free speech in journalism labs today is that what people say in the paper might hurt someone’s feelings. This is a bad argument because yes, what people say about someone in the paper might hurt that certain person, but in the long run, those feelings would help the person change. If they are talking about how bad this certain person’s class is, maybe a section in the school paper might motivate that person to change how they run their class.
    Using your 1st amendment right in public schools should be allowed because overall it might help people change bad policies.

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    In high school or middle school journalism, the school should not be able to silence the author’s free speech, even if it offends people or talks bad …

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  • Jemimah from North Carolina

    Schools should not be able to a censor student journalist. Though first amendment states that “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof, or abridging the freedom of speech, or the press, or the right of the people peaceably to assemble and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.”, organizations also have the right to censor what their employees or in the case students can say and this act is legal because school is not a public forum which means school can decide on what they want their students

    Censoring student journalist in the sense of ethics is unethical because it creates a system the only allows their propaganda to pass and to be heard by students. Censoring student journalist is equivalent to communist countries only allowing their inhabitants to hear what they have to say. Communist countries have the right to do that but it doesn’t make it ethical.

    Not censoring students has its disadvantages like students saying things that are inappropriate but censoring student journalist also has disadvantages, for example, it teaches students that their opinion does not matter, that cooperations have the power to control what they say and its also doesn’t allow for students to be creative in their expressions. Schools were created to have a place where students can learn and also express themselves. Censoring students journalist would defeat that purpose

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    Schools should not be able to a censor student journalist. Though first amendment states that “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishme…

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  • Mackenzie from North Carolina

    The first amendment allows you to practice free speech without getting in trouble with the law. The first amendment has allowed people to protest and to bring problems to light. It led to changes in government or law such as women’s suffrage movement with women protested to have the right to vote. Later on they were finally granted that option when the government established the 19th amendment which helped change women’s rights. Which is why I think schools should not censor school journalists because in history people who brought issues to light it caused change, and people should be able to hear the truth.
    The Tinker vs. The Des Moines Independent School district community involved a group of students, who wore black armbands to protest the Vietnam war. In which the school created a policy to not allow them to wear the armbands, in which they continued to wear to school. The school then sent them home in which the parents sued the school for violating the first amendment right. Tinker won the the case and the court said that schools could not censor “students rights to freedom of speech and expression unless officials can prove that more than a desire to avoid the discomfort and unpleasantness that always accompany an unpopular viewpoint” (Tinker vs. Des Moines). This case showed that students are also included in the first amendment, not just adults were granted the opportunity of free speech. If the school newspaper journalists are publishing articles with no intent of hurting someone before they publish it then they should be able to publish without being censored.
    In the Progressive Era in history journalism was very important to the time period and it led to many reforms in not only the government, but also social reform in the community. People know as Muckrakers who were journalists who exposed corruption and scandals. One popular muckraker was Upton Sinclair who wrote “The Jungle”, which exposed the meatpacking industry on how it was unsanitary and disgusting. Which informed many people including the government who realized that they were eating food from the same places rats were running in and out of. This led to government intervention which established the Federal Meat Inspection Act of 1906 that meat packing industries were required to have official check their meat before they could sell it. If journalists were censored how would anyone that would have not been put in that environment know what’s going on, and how would change ever occur. If a school journalists wants to bring to light maybe a teacher not doing her job and instead always walking out the classroom to talk to other teachers, they should be able to bring that up so maybe then the problem could get solved, but if no one knows the problem from the start then nothing would ever change. Even though it may hurt the teachers’ feelings or they might disagree, it could cause further problems like that to stop.
    People who may agree with censoring school newspapers may bring about the case of Schenck vs. The United States. In this case Schenck passed out leaflets saying that the World War I draft was against the 13th amendment of involuntary servitude. The court found him guilty saying “the first Amendment does not protect speech that creates a clear and present danger of a significant evil that Congress has power to prevent”(Schenck v. The United States). Many school officials may argue that bringing certain problems to light can cause problems in schools such as if the school sports journalists blames a certain player for losing a game. This may cause a problem between the player and school journalists involving the article, that they may think can danger others. If the school journalists do not threaten or bring in controversial problems that may cause problems that weren’t ever there then the school should be able to intervene.
    Schools should not be able to censor the school journalist newspapers, unless there are threats or controversial problems that could cause big problems that never existed. Since in the court causes discussed above students are included in the first amendment and the only time they could not use the first amendment as an excuse was when they were putting others and the united states in danger such as screaming fire when there is actually no fire, causing people to run and possibly getting trampled causing harm to people around them.

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    The first amendment allows you to practice free speech without getting in trouble with the law. The first amendment has allowed people to protest and …

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  • Jessica from North Carolina

    Following the U.S. Supreme Court case of Hazelwood School District v. Kuhlmeier in 1988, there has been debate about whether or not schools can censor certain material written by student journalists. According to the First Amendment of the Constitution, it states that “Congress shall make no law…abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press…” With that being said, why should it not apply to students? Although the censorship of student journalists may be deemed necessary in certain situations, I believe that journalism students should mostly have the freedom to express their views and beliefs, because it serves as a means of release and allows them to grow from their mistakes. An example of a situation that could require censorship would be if a student’s safety is at risk due to harassment or gossip. But, if a student were simply writing about their opinions about the school in a respectful manner, then school intervention is not necessary. As stated before, voicing one’s opinion is a constitutional right and students should not be an exception. School is supposed to be a place where students get themselves ready for the real world, and excessive censorship can hinder that development. People learn from their mistakes. That is how they grow and learn what is and is not appropriate writing. Let them learn now before they make a more severe error in the professional world.

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    Following the U.S. Supreme Court case of Hazelwood School District v. Kuhlmeier in 1988, there has been debate about whether or not schools can censor…

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  • Jordan from Texas

    First amendment: Freedom of speech

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  • Erika from Texas

    I negate the resolution and believe that schools should not be allowed to censor student journalists. I believe that the school should not be able to change or take any piece of evidence. The school could use this power to make the school look better and hide it’s flaws. For example, if a paper is showing a major flaw in the school that needs to be heard, the school could censor it and no one would hear it. Censoring a student journalist also takes away the student’s first amendment right. The first amendment states that “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.” The constitution shows that everyone should have the availability to free speech and press, even if they are a student. In Hazelwood School District v. Kuhlmeier, it ruled that student journalists do not have the same First Amendment protections as professional journalists. This supreme court ruling says that students do not have the same protection under the first amendment; however, they are still people and freedom of speech is an inalienable right and should be given to them. In “College of Saint Rose alumni back student newspaper’s claims that school is hindering press”, Mary Wilson stated that “Student journalists say their speech is being limited by the Marketing and Communications Department, but the school says they’re simply treating the students like any other media outlet.” This article states that student journalists feel as if they are being limited and are not being heard because the school is censoring them. Some others that affirmed the case believe that schools should be allowed to censor student journalists and that the school should be able to change and affect what goes in the paper. However, if the school changes and affects the paper and the student’s voice, then they are taking away their freedom of speech and their first amendment right.

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    I negate the resolution and believe that schools should not be allowed to censor student journalists. I believe that the school should not be able to …

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  • Paige from North Carolina

    The First Amendment right to freedom of speech should not be restricted to any United States citizen, besides those who present danger or harm to others, as established in the Brandenburg v Ohio Supreme Court case in 1969. Just because a citizen is in high school, or not a “real” journalist, should not prohibit them from this right, but the decision in Hazelwood School District v Kuhlmeier does exactly that. The students in that court case discussed teen pregnancy and the impact of divorce- neither of those topics being vulgar or dangerous. Because of this, I believe that the students should not have had their First Amendment right prohibited, and high school journalists should have every right protected that professional journalists have. Ever since the First Amendment was selectively incorporated to the states in Gitlow v New York (1925), it has been expected of all governments, national or local, to protect the inherent rights that come with it. Censoring what student journalists say in a high school paper goes against the promises made by the federal government, again, as long as it does not violate the clear and present danger test. If the United States cannot fulfill their promise of the Bill of Rights to every US citizen, no matter what age, then it goes against all principles that our country was founded on.

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    The First Amendment right to freedom of speech should not be restricted to any United States citizen, besides those who present danger or harm to othe…

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  • Anna from North Carolina

    In Hazelwood v. Kuhlmeier, the Supreme court decided that school administrators could censor student journalists in extreme cases if the articles were inappropriate for the school setting. It was also noted that in this court case that the paper was school funded. While this is fair if the school is taking money from its budget to fund a newspaper, school administrators should not be able to censor student journalists if the paper is student-funded.

    In the real world of journalism, media companies make money off of advertising. To keep their writers employed newspapers, radio stations, and televised news companies must sell some kind of advertisement to a business. To get businesses to buy into their advertising slots, the media source must have a large reader or viewership. Without this reader and viewership, companies would not buy advertising slots because no one would see their ads. Unlike the real world of journalism, the Hazelwood East High School newspaper was a school funded group and therefore the school technically owns that paper and can decide what is put in it.

    While it seems that most school’s newspapers are supervised by a teacher and funded by a school, some newspapers are created and printed completely independently from school funding. Because these newspapers are printed without school funding and students are either selling ads or getting outside donors to pay for printing and design software, the paper they are printing belongs to them.

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    In Hazelwood v. Kuhlmeier, the Supreme court decided that school administrators could censor student journalists in extreme cases if the articles were…

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  • Naman from Texas

    Student journalists are usually individuals that provide info about the outside world and/or the life of the school they are attending. Usually aspiring journalists, they manage to create and vocalize the arguments of the world and of the student body through their articles and presentations. Though there should be some regulations put upon the censorship and publication a young journalists has the ability to do, we must understand that most young journalists are aspiring to continue their careers in journalism. If they are out on regulations that limit their creative thinking and ability to provide information to the people, how is that preparing them for real world situations in which they must progress in such a manner? Jennifer Gish states “Work on a student newspaper prepares students for the field of journalism, and so interacting with our student journalists in the same way that we interact with media professionals is important to students’ real-world, hands-on education.” Also, the first amendment in the constitution states that one has the ability for freedom of speech, though in schools there are policies, completely leaving the administration to hinder the work of a journalist should be faulty. When arguing whether schools should be allowed to censor student journalism, I believe that schools should only hinder information that can be harmful to an individual, and/or if private information has been stated without the consent of another.

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    Student journalists are usually individuals that provide info about the outside world and/or the life of the school they are attending. Usually aspiri…

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  • Deshun from Texas

    Free speech on any subject is what makes this generation our next hope to make the world right. The adults in this world are constantly talking about how we have to be better than the last generation, but are always censoring our opinions when they don’t like it. Not only is there a clear bias in the media and who controls it, but also hypocrisy on the grounds of who can say what. This contradicts their stance on how we should be the world’s last hope.

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    Free speech on any subject is what makes this generation our next hope to make the world right. The adults in this world are constantly talking about…

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  • David from Alabama

    No, Schools should not be allowed to censor student journalists. How are we supposed to prepare our next generation of youth for the real world if we won’t even let them have a real world, hands on education. I believe that every student journalist deserves this type of education because it will benefit them in many ways so they can learn from their mistakes in the future.

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    No, Schools should not be allowed to censor student journalists. How are we supposed to prepare our next generation of youth for the real world if we …

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  • Harmony from Texas

    No, Schools should not be allowed to censor student journalists. Student Journalists have an inside view of the things going on in the school. They tend to see things going on within the school that teachers and other officials don’t. By choosing to censor them you tend to lose that inside voice on matters. The student journalists also are able to see what the students want to hear and report those events to them.

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    No, Schools should not be allowed to censor student journalists. Student Journalists have an inside view of the things going on in the school. They te…

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  • Emmie from North Carolina

    When evaluating the question of whether or not student journalists should be censored by schools, one must consider the First Amendment which states, “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech… ” By censoring a student’s thoughts one would be limiting their creative ability. Although, one may argue that it is necessary to censor student publications for privacy and safety precautions, students should be able to write and publish their material without censorship in order to be prepared for a possible career in this industry. In 1965, a group of high schoolers organized a silent protest for the Vietnam War by wearing black wristbands to school. Every student participating was suspended, this was brought to the Supreme Court (Tinker V. Des Moines) which ruled in favor of the students’ right to free speech. I oppose schools censoring student journalists because they have just as much right to free speech and expression of thought as teachers and staff should have. Although these students are young it is a necessity that if they are interested in pursuing journalism as a profession, that they have full exposure to what it would be like as a real career.

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    When evaluating the question of whether or not student journalists should be censored by schools, one must consider the First Amendment which states, …

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  • Blake from North Carolina

    I don’t believe schools should have the right to censor student journalists. The act of censoring journalists of any kind, directly violates two parts of the first amendment, freedom of speech and press. The counter argument that schools should intervene to protect privacy and safety is simply preposterous. A person of high school age is a person soon to enter the world of adulthood and should know that their actions have consequences. When posting an article with taboo opinions, one should be fully prepared to receive backlash from those with opposing opinions. Those who have the bravery to insert a personal story into an article for any purpose, should be prepared to possibly hear either support or disrespect. On the contrary, I do believe articles that are inherently bad or hateful, shouldn’t be published just like any good newspaper does. As an example, say a student was to write an article about how they hate members of the LGBT community, that would be an article that would best not be published or talked about by anyone as it is inciting hatred. All in all a certain amount of censorship is fine but too much takes away the right of freedom of speech and what our country and journalism are all about.

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    I don’t believe schools should have the right to censor student journalists. The act of censoring journalists of any kind, directly violates two par…

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  • Andrew from Texas

    I believe that schools should not be allowed to censor student journalists. This is because of the fact that much of the social media being consumed by the public can be misconstrued or manipulated to “sugarcoat” the information they are receiving. When a student becomes a journalist they know their audience, and should follow their own guidelines when it comes to that. Raw information especially, such as interview dialogue, quotes, etc. should not be censored because then you are paraphrasing what they said and changing it to your perception of it. There is also another problem with school censorship, and that is the emotion and impact of the writer, when you censor the story, you lose the passion that was put into that piece. Our country was established off the freedom of speech, of course there are times when that freedom is stretched too much, but when it comes to a student journalist, they should already know where the border is.

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    I believe that schools should not be allowed to censor student journalists. This is because of the fact that much of the social media being consumed b…

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  • Carson from North Carolina

    Schools shouldn’t be allowed to censor student journalists because it is a direct violation of the First Amendment of the Constitution of the U.S. According to Cornell Law School, the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution states, “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech.” In the first amendment to the Constitution, the document clearly states that the citizens of America, cannot have their freedom of speech violated. In the Constitution, it does not make any exceptions for violating freedom of speech, so suppressing student journalists is a breach of the freedoms they’re guaranteed. Although the Constitution doesn’t make any explicit exceptions, the U.S. Supreme Court deemed that student journalists don’t have the same first amendment protections as professional journalists, which weakens the argument on the constitutional violations due to the ruling. Another reason student journalists shouldn’t be censored is that student journalists can provide their own view or perspective on a specific topic or area. According to Lincoln University, “Rather than having the government establish and dictate the truth, freedom of speech enables the truth to emerge from diverse opinions.” This means that opinions or facts presented from diversified sources, make up the truth. If the government censored student journalists or people’s freedom of speech, the people could be strayed away from the real truth. If the U.S. government censored speech, the government would only allow material it wants to be public knowledge, released, causing a huge lack of expression among the population. Schools shouldn’t be allowed to censor student journalists because it is a direct violation of the constitution and people should be allowed to express their opinions or feelings on a certain topic.

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    Schools shouldn’t be allowed to censor student journalists because it is a direct violation of the First Amendment of the Constitution of the U.S. A…

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  • Caleb from North Carolina

    Schools should not be allowed to censor student journalists. I base this decision solely off the documents that our entire country is based on, the Constitution and the Bill of Rights. The Bill of Rights states “Congress shall make no law…abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press”. This document has been the supreme law of the land for millions of citizens over hundreds of years, but now is it no longer adequate to be used in high schools? This document has protected and ensured the rights of the citizens of the United States of America through two world wars, the cold war, and the vietnam war. The supreme law of the land has persisted through the conflicts and tough times in this country, but now is under question due to high schoolers. I understand that people’s personal life and what they do outside of school should be protected but nowhere in the constitution does it state that the government must protect people’s privacy; the Bill of Rights clearly states in the 9th amendment “The enumeration in the Constitution, of certain rights, shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people”. Since the public schools are run by a government, the government is thus upholding and enforcing an unconstitutional law. An unconstitutional law should never be imposed in the United States of America let alone enforcing an unconstitutional law on high school students who may be pursuing their dream of having a career in Journalism.

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    Schools should not be allowed to censor student journalists. I base this decision solely off the documents that our entire country is based on, the C…

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  • Owen from North Carolina

    Schools should not be allowed to censor student journalists. High school is the last few years of your life before you become of age and become an adult and leave the house. According to the supreme court’s decision in the 1988 Hazelwood School district v. Kuhlmeir, the first amendment of free speech is limited to school-sponsored publications. This should not be that case because in high school you learn how to become an adult and to be censored does not help you prepare for the real world. If schools censor what stories are being put out they are not doing their job in preparing their students for the real world.
    In the US constitution, the first amendment is right to free speech. If the schools limit what the students are allowed to publish they are not allowing their students to be prepared for the real world and they are going against the United States constitution.
    Although some people may say that students are capable of writing about very inappropriate stories and should not be trusted with creating a paper with no filter they are capable because all newspaper classes have peer editing. Through this peer editing, there would be no need to have the school censor the papers. Schools should not censor the student made papers because it does not help you become an adult, it goes against the first amendment, and it already goes through many peer edits before the article finally gets published.

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    Schools should not be allowed to censor student journalists. High school is the last few years of your life before you become of age and become an adu…

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    • Aniya from North Carolina

      Student journalists are indeed important. Their job is to provide the school with updates on different things such as sports, club highlights, and different things around their community. According to a national study done by Laurence Lain “, Nearly 98 percent of the schools of more than 1,000 students had a paper while only 67 percent of those with 250 or fewer students did so.” This shows the majority of students look to their school’s paper for information. Sometimes the school newspaper is the only source of news for some students.
      So why censor it? Many argue it should be censored to protect the privacy and safety of the school. Most school newspapers cover topics that anyone could find out by simply looking at the school up. Things such as interviews that the public wouldn’t be able to receive without the paper don’t put the school at the risk of privacy.
      Schools should be allowed to censor student journalists if the information is inaccurate or has grammar errors. Spreading false information to students can lead to different issues such as students no longer wanting to get the paper because it is unreliable. Censoring information can also affect the writers they are expecting to write the good stuff if the content isn’t all published the writer could potentially be upset. Censoring should only occur to check information that is false or has grammar issues.

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      Student journalists are indeed important. Their job is to provide the school with updates on different things such as sports, club highlights, and dif…

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  • Grayson from North Carolina

    I think schools should be allowed to let their students publish their opinions with little censorship based on the topic. Journalism in high school should teach a student the responsibilities of being a press writer if that’s what they intend on pursuing for their future career, meaning they should be able to write what they feel fitting. If there were to be censorship for published high school newspapers, I think it should be only to protect another student’s privacy or safety out of respect for a fellow classmate. Private schools should also not be under the ruling of Hazelwood School District v. Kuhlmeier. Schools that are not under state regulation should not have to listen to public school rules, as they already do. The harsh censoring of children’s writing encourages them to not speak for themselves or for what they believe in. In an article published by ABC News, it states that controlling what the students write keeps them from their duties as writers, which is to “assess the truth.” Although the high schoolers should be allowed to access their First Amendment rights of freedom of speech and press, there should be some limitations to keep children safe. There should be no publishing of libel that would hurt a student or teacher and no printing of information that would reveal private information to the public. With all this in consideration, it is, in my opinion, harmful to a student’s growth as an individual to not publish their own words and opinions because of a government rule that denies them their First Amendment rights in schools. Students should be able to say their opinions and state their findings as long as they do not put other students at risk.

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  • Annie from North Carolina

    When considering if school administration should censor student journalists it is important to remember how the censoring of a student’s work will prepare them for the professional world of journalism, so, in my opinion, I do not think schools should censor student journalists. Journalism as a professional job is to inform, report, and entertain the age of their audience however, journalism is aligned with the First Amendment. The First Amendment states that all United States citizens have freedom of speech, assembly, and worship. In regards to the First Amendment, a journalist has the constitutional right to write any story as the journalist’s wishes, as long as the malpractice use of slander or libel writing is not used. In 1965 students at a public high school wore black wristbands in resistance against the War in Vietnam however, when these students were suspended the action was taken to the Supreme Court, known as the Tinker v. Des Moines Independent School District court case which ruled that all students in the public school system have the right to freedom of speech whether it is an action or a public forum of writing. The court case ruling has favored many students who partake in journalism within their public school in allowing them to write stories that appeal to their student audience. According to the author and legal editor for family law E.A. Gjelten, school administration does have the authority to censor student journalist but the administration must have legitimate reasons behind the censorship such as slander used towards other students, vulgar speech, or dangerous speech. In consideration of the previous information on censorship of school journalists, the administration should only censor the publification of student journals if other students are put at risk from the public forum in order to properly prepare student journalists for better responsibility and future job opportunities.

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  • Alayna from North Carolina

    Students should not be censored to what they have to write about in Journalism. This class is supposed to prepare people for what Journalism will be like in the real world. If students are limited to certain things that they can write about, it takes the fun and the learning experience out of the class. Students should be allowed to publish articles that they desire to write, and have the flexibility to work with any story ideas they have thought of or heard about.

    According to dailyastorian.com, it says “The Journalism Education Association, another group that advocates for student journalists and their teachers, fundamentally believe that journalism and student publications should teach students the value of a free press, encourage lifelong learning, promote high writing standards, and support the freedom of expression” (Anderson). If students take the time to participate in a class, they should learn everything there is to learn in that field of study and be able to do use their skills to write and publish articles that students are truly proud of. Freedom of the press is a constitutional right given to the people of America. If a rule is in place restricting the rights stating in the amendments, then the rule is unconstitutional and therefore should not be permitted.

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    Students should not be censored to what they have to write about in Journalism. This class is supposed to prepare people for what Journalism will be l…

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  • Ava from North Carolina

    Schools should not be allowed to censor students journalists. If the students write about certain things or topics that should not be stated in a school setting, then that is when the school should interfere. I believe that the students should be able to voice their opinion freely, due to the First Amendment rights. The First Amendment protects freedom of speech, and this applies to journalists. The First Amendment does not protect a journalist from publishing child pornography, obscenity, or threatening language. As long as, a student journalist is not publishing child pornography, vulgar language, or threatning groups or individuals, then the student journalist should not be censored. In my opinion, student’s First Amendment rights have been violated over the years. This was demonstrated in the Supreme Court case of Hazelwood School District v. Kuhlmeier. The Supreme Court ruled that student journalists were not afforded the same protection as professional journalists. One would argue students do not have the ability to appropriately express their opinion in student publications. I would assert students should be given the opportunity, to express their opinion or the opinion of groups within the confines of the First Amendment. It is up to school leaders to guide student journalists to make appropriate and compelling arguments, for or against certain topics. Student journalists should be respectful in their language and present both sides of an argument, as long as they are meeting this criteria that should not be censored. This allows the students to see different sides of an issue, that could later impact a person’s thoughts or how they feel.

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    Schools should not be allowed to censor students journalists. If the students write about certain things or topics that should not be stated in a scho…

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  • McKyrah from North Carolina

    As a student, I would like my voice to be heard in a world where I am constantly shot down. In the school newspapers, student writers are able to express how they feel in a simple article or even two so therefore I believe that schools should not be allowed to censor student journalists. I can understand the fear of faculty and staff wanting to be cautious about what goes in the newspaper so that it is nothing too inappropriate. Many teachers often tell students how if they want their voices to be heard then they need to speak up about something they are passionate about. Whether it be about politics, environmental issues, things that are important in the news, etc. these little things could be so important to these people that it encourages them to continue a career in being an activist or journalists. One alumni from Saint Rose college stated: “Why I signed on was because I believe in journalistic integrity and I believe in our students, and they shouldn’t have to go through all these hoops,” after signing a document saying that they would stop donating to the school if the “media blockade” that was placed on them was not released. As a United States citizen everyone has the right to freedom of press and speech which is stated clear as day in the United States Constitution. As a reader of the school newspaper, I feel as if the students have self-control when it comes to their writing and they have a balance of all the right topics that are important in this world of ours. It is really encouraging to read about the topics in the school paper because it gives you a slight push to speak up and be heard about the issues that are important to you.

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    As a student, I would like my voice to be heard in a world where I am constantly shot down. In the school newspapers, student writers are able to expr…

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  • Olivia from North Carolina

    No, schools should not be able to censor student journalists. Many students have found a passion for journalism by being involved with their schools’ paper. That involvement has sparked inspiration in students to pursue a career in the public relations world following graduating high school.

    Student journalists should be treated like every other journalist in the public relations world to prepare them for the real and sometimes harsh world of publication. It is never heard of any journalist at any publication like The New York Times or The Washington Post about being punished for writing something based on facts or their own opinion. Of course, journalists do get backlash for writing certain articles and that’s something that all journalists should prepare for. Never is an article refrained from being published just because there’s one person that disagrees.

    Student journalists never try to purposefully put anyone in harm’s way when they are writing an article. When articles are written at my high school about someone for a feature, news, or sports story that person is interviewed for the article. They know what they signed up for and had the option to say no.

    When creating an issue of a paper, all articles are read and edited by many people and articles are never published to intentionally hurt or offend anyone. High schoolers journalists are constantly learning with each article that they write. Censoring what students are writing is limiting what they are able to write about which is completely against journalism, freedom of the press, and it inhibits learning. If an article directly puts any student in serious harm, that is the only time that schools should be able to interfere.

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    No, schools should not be able to censor student journalists. Many students have found a passion for journalism by being involved with their schools…

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  • Noelle from North Carolina

    In the 1988 court case, Hazelwood v. Kuhlmeier, it was ruled that school administrators are legally allowed to censor student newspapers before they are printed. I believe this is a violation of a United States citizen’s First Amendment rights and that school administrators should only be permitted to censor writing if whatever is published disrupts the functioning of the school itself. Similar to that of the Tinker vs Des Moines case where it was ruled that school officials cannot censor student speech unless it disrupts the educational process, this restriction will still allow student journalist to express their ideas without the worry that it will be taken down merely because it was an “unpopular” opinion as exemplified by the case of four school administrators deleting yearbook photos of students in “Make America Great Again” gear. Having harsh censorship will not prepare student journalists for real-world journalism and might even impair their enthusiasm for a future career in this specific field. Although in the extreme instance in which a piece of writing disrupts the functioning of the school, I believe that the school officials have the right to step in. Danica A. Roem, a former journalist, sums it up well by expressing, “We can’t have teenage reporters being treated like PR outlets by the administration.”

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  • Bailey from North Carolina

    No, schools should not be allowed to censor student journalists. Although, it seems the “right” thing to censor student journalists to an extent, students should be allowed the right of the First Amendment under the constitution and should be able to express themselves to a higher extent. Censoring student journalists could aid in assistance to the students with certain aspects such as grammar and punctuation, but not too much censoring as to where the student feels they weren’t able to express themselves or publish what they felt was exceptional for the press. As it states in Hazelwood School District V. Kuhlmeier, “Student journalists did not have the same First Amendment protections as professional journalists.”. This is implying that student journalists do not have the same freedom of the press rights as professional journalists do. This is almost degrading towards student journalists accepting the fact that a constitutional right is not being granted to them. How do you think professional journalists became professionalists? Students are learning to grow and mature and should have the same advantages as professional journalists. Having these experiences and knowing what they do or don’t want to be put out there should be up to them. It is essential that these young adults learn for themselves what they can publish and what they can’t. Being able to express yourself and to write what you believe, will help grow the minds of the student journalists and aid in what style of writing they would like to pursue one day as a journalist.

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    No, schools should not be allowed to censor student journalists. Although, it seems the “right” thing to censor student journalists to an extent, …

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  • Lilly from Iowa

    The First Amendment protects your right to free speech, and that includes everyone, even students. Student journalists are some of the most important journalists, most voice their concerns about the way the school is running, their opinions on certain controversial or political topics, and some see it as a creative outlet for writing. This helps school districts get a better understanding of what the kids that are enrolled there are thinking. Regular newspapers can’t be censored by the government unless it contains threatening publications or libel, so school administration shouldn’t be able to censor student writings simply because it’s in a school environment. Another reason is most student journalists chose to take a journalism class and aren’t in it to publish inappropriate, profane, or disrespectful articles, they write because it’s a good skill they have and they want to be heard. You cannot take away someone’s rights pertaining to writing unless it’s threatening, causes injury, or disturbs the general public.

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  • Evan from North Carolina

    School journalists should abide by the same rules and regulations present in the national media. With the little rights we are granted as students we at least deserve freedom of speech, especially in school. School is the single factor that brings the youth of America since we are all required to attend, it’s the one common thing amongst youth across the country. We can all relate to each other no matter the different schools system and in this fact it should be the one place we rely on to voice our opinions and concerns. Instead of censoring the information found within student articles and other works schools should use this as a chance to teach the democratic values within this country. The United States values rights above all else and one of the most important and basic is freedom of speech stated in the 1st Amendment the constitution is for all individuals in the United States without descriminatio, this basic right shouldn’t be forsaken just because of the age of the individual stating their opinion, n. If there is concern for the statement being offered by the student being inappropriate or too controversial then i believe that means the school didn’t properly educate them in the area of journalism. If students were properly educated in how to use the media as an outlet for news and opinions then there wouldn’t be a need to censor, but if there are individuals who still voice controversial opinions it just means these are their real beliefs and still deserve to be voiced, no matter the backlash it would cause towards the individual.

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  • Eyad from North Carolina

    High School. It’s a salad bowl of different personalities, characters and social roles that will either change or stay constant when we transition to college. The diversity of classes, clubs, and sports allows our time in high school to be a little easier by connecting to what we truly love to do, like journalism. Student publications are possibly the only source of news that will not be monitored by sponsorships or ad’s, but rather the students. With that I say this, we must do whatever we can to allow these students to publish freely and without the censorship of school administrations. The 1st amendment of the U.S Constitution states; Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press. If anything seems to be nullifying one of the constitution’s oldest principles and drafts, then the chances are it is doing exactly that. Although some would think that censorship should be an exception when it comes to the high schoolers of America as they shouldn’t be exposed to articles beyond school policy or anything above PG-13. However, this is not the case for Herriman High school in Utah. After the sudden firing of a teacher at the high school, student publishers had investigated and discovered it was due to the teacher sending inappropriate text messages to a female student. These student publishers not only demonstrated the five principles of ethical journalism stated by the Ethical Journalism Network. But have also rightfully informed their student body of the heinous crime. Although the topic was deemed “inappropriate” by most, this information should be shared with not only the high school but as well as the community.

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  • Davis from North Carolina

    “Should schools be able to censor student journalists” should not even be in question, as it is a violation of the first amendment, freedom of speech. But in this day and age, where everything is questioned, it is a pertinent topic roaming throughout schools. I believe that student journalists should be able to publish anything that they feel is ok, and the school should not be able to tell them that they cannot publish their article. Although, in the 1988 Supreme Court case Hazelwood School District v. Kuhlmeier, the Supreme Court ruled that student journalists do not have the same freedom of speech rights as professional journalists, and since then many states have passed legislation stating that schools are allowed to review student articles before allowing the student to publish their articles. I believe that this is uncalled for, as students should be prepared for the real world, where publications are not always censored. For example, the Bear Creek High School student journalists attempted at publishing an article about an 18 year old student who makes her own pornographic videos. The school district that Bear Creek falls under got wind of this article, and demanded that it be submitted for review before appearing in the newspaper. The district said the article could possibly violate a state rule that it said prevented public schools from featuring “obscenity, defamation and incitement,” and it threatened to fire the paper’s longtime faculty adviser. This was not the first time that the censoring of student journalists has brought up controversy, and it will not be the last, as I believe that schools should not be able to censor student journalists, as publishing articles on their own prepares them for the criticism of the real world, and that it is a violation of the first amendment, the freedom of speech.

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  • Kristy from Kansas

    Absolutely not! Schools should inform, advise and evaluate, but students have the same First Amendment rights as any citizen.

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  • Jacob from Kentucky

    I believe that a school newspaper should not be censored by the school administration. As shown in tinker V. Desmoines, students have first amendment rights that need to be recognized by the school. I believe that schools should not be allowed to censor if the newspaper is covering relevant information. Additionally, as long as the newspaper des do not offend students or teachers with obscenities, I believe the school should have to honor the first amendment rights of the students. Student journalists should have their freedom of press recognized as long as their newspapers follow school rules. However, I believe the school can censor if the newspaper contains offensive obscenities.

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    I believe that a school newspaper should not be censored by the school administration. As shown in tinker V. Desmoines, students have first amendment …

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  • Sarah from Arkansas

    The issue of censorship plays a pivotal part of many student journalists’ roles in their school’s department. Although there is much argument for censorship, in the end, the negative outweighs the positive.
    The main argument presented for censorship is that students will abuse their power and bully or harass certain students. This is always a possibility with free-reign, but as editor of a school newspaper, I can say that is incredibly unlikely. School newspapers focus on issues that relate to the school, such as student-politics and current events. Journalists will write what students are interested in, and personal attacks against other students sound more like middle-school drama than an actual news piece. Additionally, the issue of students harassing other students using the newspaper is not an issue for the journalism department. Instead, this would violate many school’s anti-bullying policies. Students directly attacking other students should be part of the school’s anti-bullying policies, not an issue of censorship.
    Censorship reduces the amount of information newspaper can actually produce. With the first amendment giving freedom of press, students should be allowed to write about any topic. The issue of censorship comes up most when students propose attacking the school’s administration. However, when the school administration is doing things that will hurt the school’s image, student journalists have the responsibility to report it. This is not allowed under many school’s censorship policies. A true freedom of press is not allowed unless students can use one of the main purposes of the press: to expose corruption.
    Censorship also causes students not to be able to write about politics involving their local school boards and their administration. When students find that their administration has encouraged racist political agendas in the past, they should be able to report their findings using the student newspaper. As long as it is done in a tasteful way, removing censorship would allow students to make sure their administration and school-board is made up of people who they respect.

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    The issue of censorship plays a pivotal part of many student journalists’ roles in their school’s department. Although there is much argument for cens…

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  • Moriah from New York

    In schools, we are constantly taught that the constitution is the highest law in the land. So why then is the First Amendment, the right to press, so easily taken away from students? I do understand that in 1988, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Hazelwood School District v. Kuhlmeier that student journalists did not have the same First Amendment protections as professional journalists, but isn’t that just making it seem as if students do not have the same rights as professionals? Students take up the majority of the school and should be allowed to voice their opinion, which was guaranteed to them in the First Amendment. The fact that this right is taken away from students is absurd.

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    In schools, we are constantly taught that the constitution is the highest law in the land. So why then is the First Amendment, the right to press, so …

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  • Gwen from Pennsylvania

    Student’s relinquish so many rights when they enter school property. Freedom of speech and press are fundamental in allowing students to think for themselves. Taking it away leaves the censorship to out of touch administration that as the years go by, and technology enhances are farther from understanding the younger generation. Another reason why schools should not be allowed to censor school journalism is because it limits the idea that we have the ability to do such things. If we are prohibited from publishing what we truly care about in school, how are students supposed to learn what and what not to write when the consequences could be much more severe when making a mistake.

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    Student’s relinquish so many rights when they enter school property. Freedom of speech and press are fundamental in allowing students to think for the…

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  • Mackenzie from Texas

    There are some instances in which censorship of student journalists can be considered necessary. In situations of which the students writes about possible harm to other students or topics not deemed appropriate are grounds for censorship. But this does not mean the personal opinions and views of said journalist should be subject to censorship. Student journalists should be allowed to express their beliefs, opinions, or views on a controversy. Students, and young people in general, already feels constricted in the public as they feel they are unable to express their opinions freely without severe criticism from those older than them. But if they can express their opinions on matters at school, then not only does it give them an outlet for grievances, it also positively impacts other possible choices like participating in elections (local or within the school) and even possibly running for student council/gov. positions.

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    There are some instances in which censorship of student journalists can be considered necessary. In situations of which the students writes about poss…

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  • Maddie from Kentucky

    Within public schools, I think there are specific instances when schools should be able to intervene in student newspaper articles. If a student writes an article that directly affects the safety of another student or goes against an individual’s wishes, I think school authority should have the right to preview articles. On the other hand, I do not think the school should be able to delete articles that have to do with a student’s beliefs, opinions, or stances on a controversy. This is because students may feel unable to express their attitudes within the real world if they are unable to in a smaller environment. Which in hand, could cause other adverse effects such as not participating in elections once said individuals are eligible.

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    Within public schools, I think there are specific instances when schools should be able to intervene in student newspaper articles. If a student write…

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  • jp from Kentucky

    I think schools should not be able to censor the topic that the students are writing about. Because students in high school need to be prepared for the real world. By allowing schools to fully censor the material written by students this could lead to discrimination of student. Esecially student who write about LGBTQ+ stuff or even stop a student writer from writing completely because of their sexual orientation not because of their writing content. Because under federal law there are no protections against discrimination by sexual orientation. I think that schools should only be able censor for the safety of students. Such as unsafe referencing of students and staff but that is the only reason for any censorship whatsoever.

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    I think schools should not be able to censor the topic that the students are writing about. Because students in high school need to be prepared for th…

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  • Christian from Kentucky

    Students should have the ability to share their opinions and beliefs but their are some situations that should be censored. These include if a student is using foul language such as curse words and/or other offensive language and terms. Students should not be discussing topics by using foul language because it takes away their credibility by showing that the writer can not discuss the facts plus it is a poor representation of what the school stands for. The other situations that should be censored would be if a student journalist plagiarized or wrote on a topic that should be factual but instead they used their opinion and began to falsify what actually happened. Beside these situation, students should be allowed to share what they want because according to our first amendment we all have the freedom of speech and by taking that away, we are disregarding the Constitution and the Bill of Rights.

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    Students should have the ability to share their opinions and beliefs but their are some situations that should be censored. These include if a student…

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  • Michael from Kentucky

    I think that Students should have the right to say whatever they think should be addressed. If they go to public schools they have all their rights and freedom of speech is one of the rights they have. Even if they students ask other students harsh questions, it may be wrong, but the other students have the right to say no and if they agree to answer the questions then there should be no punishment for that. If you go to a private school it is different because you are under the schools rules and you lose your freedom of speech. If you go to a public school you are able to wear whatever you want which means you should be allowed to say whatever you want. School journalist are just like newspapers, The newspapers address everything unless it is private information that should not be leaked. If newspapers are allowed to talk about teen pregnancies why can’t a school journalist talk about the same thing? Both a newspaper writer and a school journalist are the same except one is most likely older than the other.

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    I think that Students should have the right to say whatever they think should be addressed. If they go to public schools they have all their rights an…

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  • Dane from Kentucky

    I believe schools mainly should not be able to censor students. Every highschooler is old enough to make choices for themselves and make memories that will last a lifetime. I believe schools should be able to censor some areas of the newspapers, but others not. I would say let the kids have fun with it and if they do something dumb, they can be punished. Since they haven’t though, let them have the freedom to do as they please. I believe having an uncensored newspaper will allow for the readers to genuinely read and enjoy it compared to the most that don’t even think twice about looking at it. Trusting these kids can teach them valuable lessons along with the fun they can have with it. If they are smart and use comedy correctly, it could be a great addition to each school. From the fun, excited readers, and enjoyment spread throughout each school, I believe uncensoring newspapers for schools would be a great idea.

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    I believe schools mainly should not be able to censor students. Every highschooler is old enough to make choices for themselves and make memories that…

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  • Luke from Kentucky

    I think schools should not have a say in a student’s post about the school, they should have the right to say how they feel about the school. The faculty and staff will try to prevent the students from saying bad things about the school, but if it is the truth they should be allowed to post it. Although it may look bad on the school, it will also teach the school to treat all kids with respect and dignity. I firmly believe that the kids should be able to post as they please because they have their own story and only they know what they are experiencing.

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    I think schools should not have a say in a student’s post about the school, they should have the right to say how they feel about the school. The fac…

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  • Christopher from Georgia

    Generally, schools should not censor school paper publications, but there are a few instances where censorship would be appropriate. If an articles is a punitive attack on a specific student, then the school should take action to censor that publication. However, the ability of students to express their opinions, even if they are controversial. This will teach students how to approach differing viewpoints. Furthermore, this will teach aspiring journalists what the profession is really like. Schools should limit censorship to a very small set of cases so that students learn to accept differing opinions and young journalists gain insight on what professional journalism is like.

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    Generally, schools should not censor school paper publications, but there are a few instances where censorship would be appropriate. If an articles is…

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  • Grace from Colorado

    There should be an open debate for opinions on political topics as well as others. Schools should just try to include both sides of writing topics. Schools shouldn’t be able to censor content that isn’t egregiously offensive. Politics, and policies of the school should be open topics for students to share their opinions on. By censoring these things students would gain no interest in learning about things going on in the world. I don’t even read my school newspaper because it has nothing that interests me. Knowing how the girl’s basketball team did isn’t something I’m interested in reading about, but if they covered politics, I may pay attention to them. I also know that probably more than half of my school’s student body doesn’t follow anything that has to do with the school newpaper because they don’t cover any hard-hitting topics.

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    There should be an open debate for opinions on political topics as well as others. Schools should just try to include both sides of writing topics. Sc…

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  • Brianna from New Mexico

    No, but to an extent. Schools shouldn’t be allowed to censor content from student journalists that involves an opinion, political or otherwise, that they disagree with, but if the content published poses a danger to the school or anyone in it, that’s when the school should step in. If we allow the school to censor student journalists completely, that establishes a dangerous precedent in the form of silencing an entire generation of people, as well as potential new voters. In Tinker v. Des Moines (1969), the court ruled 7-2 that students do not “shed their constitutional rights to freedom of speech or expression at the schoolhouse gate,” and school journalism is a freedom of speech. The term to excuse this in Hazelwood v. Kuhlmeier is that it’s okay to censor anything that poses a “legitimate pedagogical concern,” but what counts as a legitimate concern? Who decides the standard, and can they be trusted to decide fairly? If the principal decides the standard, but the students wish to publish an article about grievances against the principal, can we be certain they will be unbiased? I believe that only if the content student journalists put out is threatening against the school or anyone in it, should it be censored. The same way real world journalists work, where we are preparing our students to end up.

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    No, but to an extent. Schools shouldn’t be allowed to censor content from student journalists that involves an opinion, political or otherwise, that t…

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  • Lina from New Jersey

    As United States citizens, student journalists have the right to free speech as per the First Amendment to the Constitution. Additionally, just like the government isn’t generally allowed to censor the writings of newspapers as long as no libels are published, schools should not be allowed to censor student writings as long as no inaccurate or slanderous information is published. It is especially important that student journalists are not censored because student publications often represent the voice of the school population and serve as important checks to democracy. The publications ensure that students have a way to voice their opinions to the school so that justice can be upheld. For example, let’s say that at a school, certain students are allowed to enter courses by their counselors due to personal connections. If the school newspaper exposes this injustice in a way not many other outlets could, appropriate action can be taken by administration to ensure all students are being treated fairly.

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    As United States citizens, student journalists have the right to free speech as per the First Amendment to the Constitution. Additionally, just like t…

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  • Nicholas from Virginia

    In the opening statement, there is an obvious violation of rights committed by the Supreme Court in 1988: Student journalists do not have the same rights as professional journalists. Are students not human, and do we not deserve the same rights as every other human? The main issue with this ruling is that with no student input, kids are force-fed information and opinions that, if they were further educated, they would whole-heartedly disagree with. We all know what happens when a group of people form an unchangeable opinion due to only knowing one side, especially is that side is the “wrong” one. For example, (in my experience) we were taught as kids that Christopher Columbus was a heroic explorer; in reality, he was a demonic enslaver. When we learned the real truth, it was hard to believe. We had been doing projects on his greatness for years, only to have our childhoods spoiled by a lie spread by one-sided opinions.

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    In the opening statement, there is an obvious violation of rights committed by the Supreme Court in 1988: Student journalists do not have the same rig…

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    • Don from Virginia

      The reason why student journalists don’t have the same rights as professional journalists is because student newspapers are funded by the school. The right to free speech doesn’t include a right to taxpayer funding of that speech. The Supreme Court’s Hazelwood decision was correct as it related to school-funded publications, but the protections must be significantly greater for individual student speech.

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      The reason why student journalists don’t have the same rights as professional journalists is because student newspapers are funded by the school. The …

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