Should future U.S. Censuses Contain a Citizenship Question?

Article 1 Section 2 of the U.S. Constitution states that every ten years a census be taken in order to count the population of the country and to apportion how many representatives in the House each state receives. Last year, the Trump administration announced that it would include a question asking if the respondent is a citizen of the United States. While the Supreme Court rejected the administration’s reasons for wanting to include a citizenship question back in June 2019—ensuring that it would not be on this year’s Census—debate over this question will increase as Census forms are filled out around the country in the coming weeks.

Those who support including a citizenship question have argued that it is important for legal purposes for the government to know the citizenship status of inhabitants of the country. This side also argues that having the citizenship question answered will better help the Justice Department enforce the Voting Rights Act and protect minority rights.

Those who oppose including a citizenship question have argued that doing so will discourage immigrants, especially undocumented ones, from filling out the Census. This side argues that the Census should be used simply to count the number of inhabitants living in the country. Any questions about citizenship, this side claims, would be included for partisan purposes.

So, what do you think? Should future U.S. Censuses contain a citizenship question? You can either vote Yes, future U.S. Censuses should contain a citizenship question; No, future U.S. Censuses should not contain a citizenship question; or something in between! Be sure to read the news articles below to help flesh out your argument even further!

Note: Ideal Think the Vote responses include the following:

-Address the question asked in a thoughtful and meaningful manner

-Use cited facts and constitutional arguments when appropriate to support their answers

-Are expressed in cohesive sentences and are free of distracting spelling, punctuation, and grammatical errors

-They address counter-arguments and opposing concerns in a respectful manner

-They organize their answer in a manner that flows logically and reads clearly

Current Standings:
Yes: 42%
No: 58%
  • Will from North Carolina

    The question “Are you a US citizen?” should definitely be included in any future US census. According to Article 1 Section 2 of the Constitution, the main purpose of the census is to count the number of US citizens in order to correctly determine how many House of Representative seats each state receives. According to Elaine Kamarck and Christine Stenglen, two census research analysts of Brookings Institution in Washington DC, there are currently around ten to twelve million illegal immigrants living in the United States, which makes up around 3.5% of the US population. The number of House seats for each state would be skewed if the numbers of noncitizens are included in the results of the Census. Although there are many noncitizens currently living in the United States, this large group can not be represented in government because of the fact that they are not citizens, and only US citizens are represented in the US government. For this reason, the citizenship question on the census would be solely used to accurately estimate how many US citizens there are in order to correctly divide up the House of Representative seats among the states. Opposers to the citizenship question on the census believe that this is a question used for partisan purposes and that the census is only used simply for statistics of how many people are living in the country. For one, the purpose of the census is explicitly stated in the Constitution to be a tool to determine the number of House seats. Also, to address the opposition’s concern about the question being used for partisanship purposes, how is upholding the Constitution be considered a question of partisanship? To fully uphold the Constitution and get the most accurate results as possible for the census, the question of “Are you a US citizen?” must be added to the census.

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    The question “Are you a US citizen?” should definitely be included in any future US census. According to Article 1 Section 2 of the Constitution, …

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    • William from California

      Current legal corpus suggests that non citizens should indeed be represented by legislatures. Is it fair to suggest that green card holders, people who are essentially civilians in everything but in voting and in name? Your argument completely ignores this reality and irresponsibly suggests that the only non citizens are illegal immigrants.

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      Current legal corpus suggests that non citizens should indeed be represented by legislatures. Is it fair to suggest that green card holders, people wh…

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  • David from California

    Are you a US citizen is definitely be included, as the census is based off of the citizenship of the people in our country. This also helps the country determine how many undocumented immigrants are in the country and how to allocate resources while still getting an accurate measure of our population vs citizenship.

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    Are you a US citizen is definitely be included, as the census is based off of the citizenship of the people in our country. This also helps the countr…

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  • carlos from Pennsylvania

    In my opinion, the question “Are you a United States citizen?” is a really important question that should be included in the census. If we consider that as stated in the constitution, “the purpose of the census is to count the population of the country and to apportion how many representatives in the House each state receives”, the question of whether or not you are an american citizen is really important because when the seats of the House of Representatives are being distributed between the different states we only need to count the number of people that are able to vote so that we avoid creating a system in which living in a zone with lots of non-voters immigrants would mean that your vote would count more than the vote of a person that lives in another state with a smaller non-voter immigrant population.

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    In my opinion, the question “Are you a United States citizen?” is a really important question that should be included in the census. If we consider th…

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  • mountain from Pennsylvania

    I think the census should definitely ask about your citizen ship. Many jobs do have you got to different countries and there-fore there is a work visa, which allows you do go to another country almost all the time. Another thing is that, if censuses are going to go so far as to ask you if you have other people living in your home or something like that, it is totally appropriate to ask if you are from another country, or how long you have been a citizen of the country you are living in.

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    I think the census should definitely ask about your citizen ship. Many jobs do have you got to different countries and there-fore there is a work visa…

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  • Chaise from Pennsylvania

    I think we should have citizenship questions in future censuses because it will help us with accurate numbers of legal and illegal immigrants in the country. I think this is very important to a state’s number of representatives because it is based on number of population.Getting an accurate number of illegals will help the government determine how many votes will not count towards population for the states or representatives since they are not legal immigrants in the country.

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    I think we should have citizenship questions in future censuses because it will help us with accurate numbers of legal and illegal immigrants in the c…

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  • Evan from Pennsylvania

    I do believe that the census should include a citizenship question. I support this because I believe our state should be given our amount of representatives based on how many legal citizens we have contributing to our nation. Our state should not be given extra representatives for people who entered this country illegally and do not belong here in the first place.

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    I do believe that the census should include a citizenship question. I support this because I believe our state should be given our amount of represent…

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  • lauren from Pennsylvania

    I do believe there should be a question about U.S citizenship. Due to the fact that you should be a valid US citizen to even be voting in the Census. Also regardless of being in this country legally or not , the government should know how many people live here in the us to identify the amount if senators that should be in a projected are and also the amount of security that should around that area as well. I believe it would be a great question to involve in the upcoming Census.

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    I do believe there should be a question about U.S citizenship. Due to the fact that you should be a valid US citizen to even be voting in the Census. …

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  • Molly from Pennsylvania

    The United States Census should include a question about citizenship. The main reason of the census is to reassign seats in Congress. However, only citizens get to vote for their representatives. By counting non-citizens and not knowing how many people on the census are citizens versus non-citizens, you don’t get a true count of how many citizens each representative represents. This can cause a problem if states by the borders count non-citizens because those states will seem to have larger number when the number of citizens is much lower than the number of people overall.

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    The United States Census should include a question about citizenship. The main reason of the census is to reassign seats in Congress. However, only ci…

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  • Ella from Pennsylvania

    It is important when counting the number of people in the state to specify whether or not they are a citizen. In the Article of the Constitution mentioned at the top of the page, it specifies that the census is to count the number of US citizens. You cannot count the number of US citizens if you are unaware of the amount that are or are not citizens. Yes, the population is made up of non-citizens as well, but they don’t have to be counted legally. It makes sense to count the participants and the citizens. By, becoming a citizen, you become a member of the US. Shouldn’t we count the active members?

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    It is important when counting the number of people in the state to specify whether or not they are a citizen. In the Article of the Constitution menti…

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  • Elijah from North Carolina

    The act of adding a citizenship question to the census would allow for better documentation of the overall amount of people within the country, and in theory the total of inhabitants that retain a long standing citizenship versus unprocessed immigration. This is met with the counterargument of partisan politics in favor of Trump’s political agenda, that would ultimately dissuade the immigrant population from participating in the national census. These are the two main sides of the argument, and personally I lean towards yes, but not entirely. The calculation for percentile error can be defined as the “positive or negative of the division of the square root of the [county name] times population squared plus [county name] times population squared + [county name] times population squared by [county name] multiplied by the cumulative population of the total areas” (U.S. Census Bureau, 2016). This defines the percentage of error in counting alone. This does not account for the illegal immigrant population who fear anything to do with the United States government seeking them out, nor does it account for those who simply ignore the census entirely. The issue I personally have with the citizenship question, is what the current president plans to do with this information, perhaps there would be no malintent with this seemingly obvious attempt to gather more information against the peoples he has openly shown disdain for. In the end, the argument that the question is a show of partisan politics holds no water until it is proven, and in a country that requires sufficient evidence for any form of conviction, I see this claim as another conspiracy pertaining to one of the most controversial presidents since Hoover was in office. The fact that the main arguments against this question are a claim of partisan political events, and a slightly more viable case of fear of the question by the people it targets, ultimately the argument of providing a more accurate census holds more water. Of course this argument isn’t to state I agree with Trump or his actions as a president, but I most certainly do not disagree with his choice of enacting a citizenship question when taking an objective view of the situation.

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    The act of adding a citizenship question to the census would allow for better documentation of the overall amount of people within the country, and in…

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  • Cee from South Dakota

    I believe that citizenship should be a question on the census. Not all people living in America legally are citizens. There are work visas, student visas, and Permanent Residents Cards that allow people to be residents of the US while not being citizens. It would help show a more accurate representation of the citizenship of a population in specific locations.

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    I believe that citizenship should be a question on the census. Not all people living in America legally are citizens. There are work visas, student vi…

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  • Jessica from South Dakota

    They don’t pay taxes and we pay for them. They learn how to live without the government knowing about them. After we learn who they are we can get them to pay taxes and become U.S. citizens.

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    They don’t pay taxes and we pay for them. They learn how to live without the government knowing about them. After we learn who they are we can get the…

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  • Ryan from North Carolina

    The US should include a citizenship question on the US Census. We need a citizenship question for creating a budget for the country. After all, at one Democratic Presidential primary debate in June, all canidates for the Democratic nomination agreed, “their government helathcare plan… would provide coverage for undocumented immigrants.” Putting aside the debate as to whether this is a good idea or not, how could we know how much money we need to provide the coverage for undocumented immigrants if we do not know how many undocumented immigrants there are in our country (Schwartz, 2019). Also the census Bureau would not necessarily have to report illegal immigrants to ICE if they answered that they were here illegally. Many criminals in fact, file taxes on their illegal income to avoid being charged with tax evasion. They do this because the IRS will not report them in most every case (Hargreaves, 2013). The Census bureau could do the same, thus avoiding a miss count due to people being afraid to answer the census. This is one of the main criticisms of adding the citizenship question to the Census, and it could be avoided and resolved if the Census Bureau advertise that they would not report undocumented immigrants to immgration agencies. Also the Census is used to determine the amount of people who live in an area. This data is used to decide the amount of representation that area will have in legislative bodies. Therefore, more power could be added to places where there are large amounts of undocumented immigrants. This is problematic because the job of Congress is to serve the citizens of our country first, and then if we are able and willing as a country, to do what we can to help the rest of the world. If representatives are determined using census data that includes non-citizens as a part of the count of population used to determine representation in government, power would be taken away from US citizens.

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    The US should include a citizenship question on the US Census. We need a citizenship question for creating a budget for the country. After all, at one…

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  • Brady from Illinois

    There should absolutely be a citizenship question in the United States Census. The reason comes down to the Constitution. Article 1, Section 2, reads, “Representatives and direct Taxes shall be apportioned among the several States which
    may be included within this Union, according to their respective Numbers, which shall be
    determined by adding to the whole Number of free Persons, including those bound to
    Service for a Term of Years, and excluding Indians not taxed, three fifths of all other
    Persons.”
    Art. 1, Sec. 2 directly mentions taxes. All US citizens pay taxes, but not all residents do. Why should taxes be determined by a number that isn’t even accurate to the amount of people that have to pay taxes? If more people are counted than taxed, then that means the government has overestimated how much tax money they will collect, which means they will overestimate their budget, which means they will probably go into more debt, which is not exactly the best thing for our country. The argument that some residents pay taxes will be brought up. This is true. However, for all analyses, it is better to count those who are citizens rather than those who are not. A better question might be, “Do you pay an income tax?” or “Are you now or in the process of becoming a citizen?” Our system is not perfect, but the census would be better with a citizenship question than without.

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    There should absolutely be a citizenship question in the United States Census. The reason comes down to the Constitution. Article 1, Section 2, reads,…

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  • Spencer from South Dakota

    I think yes they should add the question because it is a law that people all people that live in America are born here or have the information to immigrant here.

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  • Karl from South Dakota

    Even though immigrants might not fill it out it still would be good to have because at least they will have rough estimate of how many people live in the U.S. and it is good to have an estimate, but many people might not fill it out anyways. But it is still a good idea to have it because if they want to know at least have it there to look at. If they have it there they should put a n ote at the bottom that states why they have maybe saying that it is for them to know how many people are in the U.S. so they can at least get an estimate of how many people are there so every one might fill it out.

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    Even though immigrants might not fill it out it still would be good to have because at least they will have rough estimate of how many people live in…

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  • charlie from South Dakota

    I think we should because I think it is necessary to know a more accurate number of how many people are in the U.S.A . and if you think we shouldn’t have it because you are afraid they will track you to see if you aren’t a U.S citizen that sucks for you because you are illegal you shouldn’t be here anyway

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    I think we should because I think it is necessary to know a more accurate number of how many people are in the U.S.A . and if you think we shouldn’t …

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  • Trista from South Dakota

    There should be a citizen question so the government knows who are all in the country so they know if every one voting is a legal ctizen

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  • Alexander from South Dakota

    It’s a harmless question

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  • Annie from Utah

    i think it would be great it used in the correct way by the government

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  • Lexi from North Carolina

    Article 1, Section 2 of the United States Constitution is very vague yet direct in the role of the Census: “The actual Enumeration shall be made within three Years after the first Meeting of the Congress of the United States, and within every subsequent Term of ten Years, in such Manner as they shall by Law direct.” Thus, the Census serves to determine how many Congressional representatives each state will have based on population and in the present it is used to determine federal funding needs to each respective state.

    With the 2020 Census coming up, it poses the issue of whether to include a citizenship question. Based on the status quo and lack of Constitutional foundation, the citizenship question does not make a difference. Based on court precedent, it should not be used in the 2020 Census, but it is worth considering in the future.

    According to the United States Census Bureau’s government website, the citizenship question originated with the 1820 Census. It has not been a Census question in recent decades, but the Census Bureau does ask the citizen question on other forms such as the American Community Survey. Thus, the citizenship question has already been covered by the American Community Survey since 2010. Additionally, in the case DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ET AL. v. NEW YORK ET AL., the Supreme Court — which has the final say on the constitutionality of policies — struck down the idea of including the citizenship question in the 2020 Census.

    In theory, though, if the citizenship question was on future censuses, the United States Census Bureau is legally not allowed to disclose the answers to anyone. If high level government agencies such as the Federal Bureau of Investigation cannot use or obtain the information — as noted by United States Code, Title 13 — the privacy concern over the citizenship question is illogical.

    Although the privacy concern is unfounded, there has been the much bigger debate of whether the citizenship question would deter people, such as immigrants and minorities, from filling out the Census. However, it is important to note that there have and always will be individuals that do not wish to partake in the Census or other government-sponsored documents. In the same way that anarchists could care less about taxes and laws, some people could care less about filling out the Census truthfully. Surveys, of any kind, will always have imperfections, hence why there is a margin of error.

    When people are made aware of the security level of the private information they report in the Census, the citizenship question alone would and should not drastically alter total participation. In the end, it should be expected that some individuals will not partake in the United States Census. While there is a fine on not participating or lying, $100 or $500, respectively, may not be enough to keep high participation in the Census.

    Ideally, though, everyone should fill out the Census to the best of their abilities because demographic information such as citizenship status allows for better understanding of the United States policy needs and equal representation of states. Because the American Community Survey covers the citizenship question and the Supreme Court decision, the 2020 Census does not need to focus on citizenship.

    In the future, it is worth considering a citizenship question. The worry over privacy and discrimination would not be legally possible as the Census is held to high confidentiality and solely uses such demographic information to form statistics and representation.

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    Article 1, Section 2 of the United States Constitution is very vague yet direct in the role of the Census: “The actual Enumeration shall be made wit…

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  • Tyler from South Dakota

    It would be incredibly valuable to include a United States Citizenship question in the Census. Immigrants that have come here legally will have nothing to worry about as they’ve already passed the citizenship test. They should have the prior information necessary to complete the rest of the Census. Illegal immigrants are not citizens of the United States. No matter what you may think, the Census was designed to keep track of United States citizens and not tourists or illegals. This question could also help track down illegal immigrants residing in the United States. If someone chooses not to answer the Census because they are illegal, they won’t be counted towards the Census anyway which is no issue. Illegal immigrants are not considered members of this country and should be made to answer a citizenship question as they weren’t supposed to be here in the first place.

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    It would be incredibly valuable to include a United States Citizenship question in the Census. Immigrants that have come here legally will have nothin…

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  • matt from South Dakota

    I believe that the question should be included. My reason is that the census affects the number of votes that a state has. If there are people living in a state that has no power to vote and affect the government they should not be counted towards the population of that state for representatives. With that said the other purpose of the census is to see how many people are living within the country. If you include the question many peoples who are not in the United States legally will decide not to answer out of fear. Because of that, the census should remain anonymous so if people answer that they are not a United States citizen they could not be identified and tracked down. So for accurate representation, the census should include a question about being a United States Citizen

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    I believe that the question should be included. My reason is that the census affects the number of votes that a state has. If there are people living …

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  • J from South Dakota

    I feel like we need to incorporate this but I also feel like we should not use the information to pursue these people but use the information to help them become citizens. I believe that America was made from different people from all over the world and we should continue to expand that and not kick these people out.

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    I feel like we need to incorporate this but I also feel like we should not use the information to pursue these people but use the information to help …

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  • Christopher from South Dakota

    I feel as though it would make sense for there to be a question on if you are a Citizen as this directly affects the elections. If you are here illegally or on VISA you shouldn’t be counted anyways as you are not a US citizen. I could understand if this didn’t affect anything other than knowing just the population for this not to be on there, but at the end of the day the amount of votes a state should get shouldn’t change due to illegal immigration.

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    I feel as though it would make sense for there to be a question on if you are a Citizen as this directly affects the elections. If you are here illega…

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  • Jackson from North Carolina

    The US census is a very important part of our constitution, it ensures that we have an accurate gauge of our population and location of that population. In addition to providing us with accurate economic, demographic, and cultural statistics, the Census is what determines congressional districts and therefore electorates in a general election. In recent months there has been a debate over whether or not to include a citizenship question on the census, this is something that you would think wouldn’t be debatable. It seems like the biggest reason there is any opposition at all is because Trump is behind it.
    Much of the opposition says that a fear of deportation would result in Illegal Immigrants not responding, resulting in skewed results and incorrect districts. But that’s the current problem, you have to be a citizen to vote, and that’s why we need an accurate count of citizens to enforce the Voting Rights Act. A mix of citizens and not-citizens results in skewed numbers and misrepresented districts.
    People also talk about how the census bureau shared information to help arrest Japanese Americans, IN THE 1940s. Our government today is completely different than it was in the 40s, and for something like that to happen would require a systematic failure of checks and balances. For these reasons, I believe that a citizenship question would be a good idea to include in the census.

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    The US census is a very important part of our constitution, it ensures that we have an accurate gauge of our population and location of that populatio…

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  • Emmie from North Carolina

    I believe that there should be a U.S. citizenship question included on the census because it is crucial for legal and statistical purposes that the government knows the citizenship status of our country. Secretary of of Commerce, Wilbur Ross explains the additional question as something to simply receive accurate citizenship rates throughout the census. “For the approximately 90 percent of the population who are citizens, this question is no additional imposition,” Ross continued. “And for the approximately 70 percent of non-citizens who already answer this question accurately on the ACS [American Community Survey], the question is no additional imposition since census responses by law may only be used anonymously and for statistical purposes.” In my opinion, this additional question is no invasion of privacy considering it would be anonymous. Having this question answered through the census will not only provide more accurate statistics for the government about citizenship but also will help the Justice Department enforce the Voting Rights Act while protecting minority rights. This action will return the census back to a historical precedent to receive the most accurate statistics in return. “Seems totally ridiculous that our government, and indeed Country, cannot ask a basic question of Citizenship in a very expensive, detailed and important Census, in this case for 2020,” said President Donald Trump in a Twitter post (CNN). The census would not be as accurate or informative without this question being included, leaving President Trump feeling as if he would have wasted billions of dollars. “The Trump administration claimed the citizenship question on the census questionnaire is necessary to better comply with federal voting rights law.” (CNN)

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    I believe that there should be a U.S. citizenship question included on the census because it is crucial for legal and statistical purposes that the go…

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  • Annie from North Carolina

    In my opinion, the U.S. Census should include a citizenship question. The U.S. Census helps determine how many seats each state gets for the House of Representatives for voting matters. However, if illegal immigrants or those who aren’t legal citizens are registered under the U.S. Census than the Census will not give an appropriate nor accurate estimate of how many U.S. residents there are per state. With nonqualified information regarding U.S. residents, the number of House of Representatives will be altered making the voting process unfair. According to the Pew Research Center, states such as California, New Jersey, Texas, Illinois, Florida, and New York have thousands of illegal immigrants with California at a shocking 2.2 million illegal residents. These 6 states put the other states that are less prone to illegal immigrants at a disadvantage to the number of seats in the House of Representatives since illegal immigrants are being mixed in with the population in other states. Also, in election matters illegal immigrants cannot vote since they are not legal citizens, meaning, illegal immigrants contribute to the number of seats the House of Representatives has but then cannot vote in elections, deeming the system to be unfair. By including the U.S. citizenship question the unfairness and inequality of populations will be lessened. According to the USA today, “The Constitution mandates the federal government count every American once per decade via the census, but the debate over the question threatens to disrupt the process” although the Constitution does say to count every American, illegal immigrants are not considered legal U.S. citizens meaning illegal immigrants should technically not be included into the census until acquiring legal citizenship. Overall, the U.S. Census should include the question of U.S. citizenship in order to accurately depict the total amount of Americans who will be voting in order to keep the balance and constitutional recommendation of the U.S. Census.

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    In my opinion, the U.S. Census should include a citizenship question. The U.S. Census helps determine how many seats each state gets for the House of …

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  • Joel from South Dakota

    The question “are you a US citizen?” is so closed-ended as others have argued but I feel if it was modified to something along the lines of ” Are you eligible to vote?” would allow for more accurate data for the census to use, it would allow for a more accurate campaign for the presidency as well as prevent gerrymandering as it is defined “manipulate the boundaries of (an electoral constituency) so as to favor one party or class.” (oxford) this means manipulating borders, not voters. This question shouldn’t be worrying for immigrants and minorities as the changed format applies to voter status not immigration status, though if you are worried about deportation “It is against the law for any Census Bureau employee to disclose or publish any census or survey information that identifies an individual or business. This is true even for inter-agency communication: the FBI and other government entities do not have the legal right to access this information.” (Gauthier) This means that they wouldn’t be able to give citizenship status to ICE to enforce the law. In conclusion, I think that yes, we should add a question about voting status to more accurately represent the voting population of each state.

    Work Cited
    Gauthier, Jason. “Privacy & Confidentiality – History – U.S. Census Bureau.” Privacy & Confidentiality – History – U.S. Census Bureau, http://www.census.gov/history/www/reference/privacy_confidentiality/.
    “Gerrymander: Definition of Gerrymander by Lexico.” Lexico Dictionaries | English, Lexico Dictionaries, http://www.lexico.com/en/definition/gerrymander.

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    The question “are you a US citizen?” is so closed-ended as others have argued but I feel if it was modified to something along the lines of ” Are you …

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  • Logan from South Dakota

    In my opinion, The United States censuses should include a question about citizenship because it is very important to know who in this county is here legally or illegally. This is important because the amount of representatives a state gets is based on the population of a state. Say for instance all the people living in the great state of South Dakota are here legally and we have 100,000 people, and for every 100,000 people, you get a representatives in the house. Say that out of all the people but in California 1/3 of the people are illegal immigrants and they have 300,000 people. Why is it fair that another state gets another representative solely based on a population of illegal immigrants. Its not.

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    In my opinion, The United States censuses should include a question about citizenship because it is very important to know who in this county is here …

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  • easton from South Dakota

    yes because then you can count everyone in the United States, but it allows us to figure out who is legal and is not legal.

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  • Ashton from South Dakota

    I think that we should make it a question for one main reason, we should have an accurate count for all of the people that are here legally not illegally, the people that are here illegally should not be here even if they were running away from something or someone. they should still go through the legal process and should not be counted otherwise. If we just count them however we like it can make the people that are here legally discouraged and less likely to fill it out and or fill it out truthfully. the people that should be here legally should be our top priority, if they are not here legally then they can’t vote. if they can’t vote then having them here illegally defeats the purpose of giving the state another representative. In short, what I’m saying is that people being here illegally is not healthy for the country and even less healthy for the census.

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    I think that we should make it a question for one main reason, we should have an accurate count for all of the people that are here legally not illega…

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  • Ryland from South Dakota

    I believe that the Future US Censuses should contain a citizenship question. I believe this because for example the number of representatives each state can have depends on the states population, now if illegal immigrants are living in states, their number should not count towards the amount of representatives. This question should also be on the 2020 Census so the government can try harder to give the immigrants citizenship or to crack down on the safety of our people. I’ve even known families that have immigrated to the United States legally, and they believe that illegal immigrants should enter the United states legally, so the government can check the people coming in. And to actually protect the people living there, the people that come here illegally or crossing the border most of the time are people trying to provide for their family trying to give them a future, but in the sand slipping through the governments fingers there are shells in there too that cut your fingers. Those are the murderers or the traffickers or terrorists. Do we really need another 911 to get us to look at the safety of the people? If you want to come into this country do it legally, you can never have to worry about being deported if you immigrate legally, you can get jobs to provide for your family, you can receive the benefits of our government. This question is for our government to know how much work is needed to ensure everyone is taken care of and everyone is safe.

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    I believe that the Future US Censuses should contain a citizenship question. I believe this because for example the number of representatives each sta…

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  • Solara from South Dakota

    I think the U.S. should contain a census question for the immigrants who come here to America so we can know who came here legally and illegally. We don’t want to get mixed up or not know who came here with all the laws, rules, and documentary already being recorded or not.

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    I think the U.S. should contain a census question for the immigrants who come here to America so we can know who came here legally and illegally. We d…

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  • sebastian from South Dakota

    yes because it would be helpful to tell who is in our country illegally so we can take care of them.

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  • Justen from South Dakota

    Yes, the census should have a question about citizenship because censuses are supposed to accurately portray the number of citizens we have in the country. To the illegal immigrant self-incrimination, if the Illegal immigrants have to lie on a census to remain in the country, then that tells you that they shouldn’t be in the country since they are breaking the law. For the immigrants residing in the US illegally and taking advantage of American welfare programs at the cost of the taxpayer.

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    Yes, the census should have a question about citizenship because censuses are supposed to accurately portray the number of citizens we have in the cou…

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  • Kylee from South Dakota

    I think they should include a citizen question because as said in the text it is important for the government to know the citizen status of inhabitants of the country and having citizenship questions answered will better help the justice department on enforcing voting rights and it will protect minority rights.

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    I think they should include a citizen question because as said in the text it is important for the government to know the citizen status of inhabitant…

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  • Zach from North Carolina

    In determining whether the United States should include a citizenship question on the 2020 census, the reasoning behind why this would be done needs to be addressed. The US census was created in 1790 to gather basic information of age, sex, and race. Ultimately, today, the census is used to help divide seats in the House of Representatives. Because the House of Representatives is divided on population, and helps contribute to some of the biggest roles in government like making laws and helping to elect the president, it is incredibly important that an accurate count be held of all people within the US. Furthermore, it is important that this count be representative of the total number of eligible voters in order to make sure that the number of representatives being distributed is proportional to the eligible voters in an area.
    By understanding this breakdown, it is important to come to the final conclusion that because the US only allows citizens to vote, having a citizenship question in order to properly have an accurate count of citizens who are able vote is necessary. Without this information, it is likely that representatives could be distributed to states that may not actually have that population of eligible voters. Asking the citizenship question would provide the best solution to this issue because it allows the United States to determine the actual count of voters in each region rather than a rough estimate, most effectively.
    While those who oppose the addition of a citizenship question argue that the total number of non-citizens responding to the census would decrease and that the US census is only interested in a proverbial “head-count,” I do not necessarily disagree. However, the purpose of the census still remains: obtaining the total number of eligible voters in order to properly divide representatives to states. Although the question may discourage those who are not citizens from answering, the citizens who do vote are ultimately what the census is designed for. It should also be noted that the minority groups that are citizens will be able to show more clearly to Congress, which would lead to more specific legislation passed that would be beneficial to minority groups on issues such as housing or discrimination (i.e. The Voting Rights Act). Furthermore, the idea that the census citizenship question would only be used for partisan purposes is an unfair claim due to the fact that other programs use citizenship questions without a political agenda backing their responses. The Department for Health and Human Services (HHS) already requires potential food stamp recipients to confirm their citizenship during the application process. Should someone answer “no” their application is simply voided. The same would work for the census questions. The result of answering “no” does not have to be used for partisan purposes, and does not have to endanger a person’s residency. Instead, their vote could just be voided, instead just counting them as a resident, but not an eligible voter.
    In conclusion, including a citizenship question on the 2020 census would improve the current tally system for the distribution of representatives and would provide Congress with the ability to provide more opportunities to minority voters. Through its implementation, the US can hope to have a more representative house, and a system that reflects the whole in the most accurate way possible.

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    In determining whether the United States should include a citizenship question on the 2020 census, the reasoning behind why this would be done needs t…

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  • Brooke from North Carolina

    I believe that the US Census should contain a citizenship question. President Trump tweeted that it was ridiculous that our country could not ask a basic citizenship question in such an expensive, detailed, and important questionnaire. According to the United States Census Bureau, the purpose of a census is to, “determine the distribution of Congressional seats to states, make planning decisions about community services, and distribute more than $675 billion in federal funds to local, state, and tribal governments each year.” Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, argues that this will allow “complete and accurate census block level data.” In other words, the government will be able to monitor the amount of residents who can vote. Placing a citizenship question on the census could discourage illegal residents in the United States from filling out the census, thus skewing the population count within that particular area. However, one of the main purposes of the census is to redistrict based on the number of residents eligible to vote, which illegal residents are not able to do. Being aware of this crucial citizenship data would allow the government to enforce local voting laws and fairly adjust voting districts across the nation.
    Critics are afraid that this could create a shift in power within Congress because the seats are currently based on the current total population, not the total population of legal citizens. States with a large number of illegal immigrant communities may lose seats in Congress and government aid, but those funds would be allocated to areas with legal citizens who pay their taxes.
    Other countries, such as Canada, Australia, Ireland, Mexico, and Germany, include a citizenship question in their census, and the United Nations recommends the practice. By having a citizenship question on the United States census, the Justice Department will be able to better enforce the Voting Rights Act and protect minority rights. The Voting Rights Act “aimed to overcome legal barriers at the state and local levels that prevented African Americans from exercising their right to vote under the Fifteenth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States.” This ensures that everyone who is legally allowed to vote, will be able to vote. The importance of gathering the most accurate data regarding residents of the United States outweighs the risk of the possibility of a reduction in responses.

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    I believe that the US Census should contain a citizenship question. President Trump tweeted that it was ridiculous that our country could not ask a ba…

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  • Olivia from North Carolina

    Yes, I believe that future United States censuses should contain a citizenship question to make sure every state is provided equal voting rights. According to the Brennan Center for Justice, “The census touches virtually every aspect of our lives, determining our political representation, shaping how federal resources are allocated, powering our businesses, driving decisions by schools and police departments, and informing medical research.” Although our country was based on immigrants, America, as any country would have, has a process to become a citizen. To be a citizen has rights and privileges. As US citizens, we are required to pay taxes, vote, and be military eligible for drafts. All these factors determine our democratic way of life, and people who are here illegally hinder the system.
    The government needs accurate counting of the population to determine things such as delegates, representation in congress, and the electoral college. By having an accurate census count, it will determine proper voting rights in our country. Our census count is based on population count and states with more immigrants count as “undercounts” which can cause congressional seats to be lost in that state. It is right to find out who the citizens are in a state because they are the ones who count as legal votes. It would also benefit to add a citizenship question to the census because it can give us back census data which can help tract legal and illegal immigration trends. This information serves as a purpose to guide big decisions in the government, businesses and helps researchers demographically. Section 2 of the Voting Rights Act states it, “prohibits voting practices or procedures that discriminate on the basis of race, color, or membership in one of the language minority groups.” This act pushes that all citizens living in America should receive equal voting rights.

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    Yes, I believe that future United States censuses should contain a citizenship question to make sure every state is provided equal voting rights. Acco…

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  • Jackson from North Carolina

    I do think that the U.S. census should include a question regarding citizenship. The main argumentative point against the question being included is that it would deter undocumented immigrants away from filling out the form, but they could still easily fill out the form and show that they are working towards gaining citizenship. Also, if they aren’t documented, and not aren’t US citizens, then it needs to be noted because they can’t vote, which means they shouldn’t be allowed to affect the number of votes a state has, and have a direct effect on the elections for the next decade. An article for the Washington Post makes the argument that part of the solidifying argument against the added question is the standing court cases that ruled differently then what would be in favor of adding a question. However, the court cases that are used right now as precedent, were ruled in a time where the number of foreign-non citizens was at an all-time low, whereas today, it is a tremendously different time, and the relevance of the issue has risen again. Our country was built on a “one person-one vote” foundation. With the way our current census is set up, and our country is running our districting setup, and statistical analysis, it is no longer a “one person-one vote” foundation. Certain votes are becoming more valuable than others, solely based on the fact that the number of votes a certain state gets aren’t justifiable, and don’t logistically match up with the number of real votes they get, compared with the amount of “citizens’ they have in their state. If the US would add to the census, a citizenship question, it would become more consistent in counting the number of “voting-eligible” citizens, and no longer be affected by the numerous amounts of foreign-born-non citizens.

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    I do think that the U.S. census should include a question regarding citizenship. The main argumentative point against the question being included is t…

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  • Reagan from North Carolina

    I think the U.S. Census should include a citizenship question. Although the main purpose of a census according to New York Times is “to determine, based on population, how many seats each state will have in the House of Representatives — and by extension, how many votes in the Electoral College. But census data is used for a great many other purposes as well, including the allocation of about $900 billion in federal spending each year. That money helps pay for everything from public schools and Medicaid benefits to law enforcement and highway repairs. State and local governments use the data in similar ways, including setting the boundaries of legislative districts”, it will give the numbers of legal and illegal immigrants in the United States to give to a judge if the number was needed. Many people believe that the question “Are you a US citizen” will be used the wrong way, for example, finding the illegal immigrants and deporting them. However, this question will simply provide a count of the amount of people who reside in the US and to determine how congressmen are apportioned. New York Times states, “But regardless of whether the question appears on census forms, the damage, many experts say, has already been done. The fear engendered by the administration’s immigration policies will make the job of census workers difficult in primarily immigrant neighborhoods, regardless of whether or not the citizenship question is added”. This proves that even if people choose not to fill out the census because of the question, the census workers are still going to arrive to residents who have not filled out this form. This shows that everyone will be forced to complete the form regardless of how they feel about the question. It is stated in the Constitution that a census is only used to determine how to distribute congressmen to each region/state. If people believe that this is the main use of a census, then citizens should not be concerned about this question in the form. The question is only there to decide if illegal immigrants should be included in the population of a state or region to distribute congressmen in the future.

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    I think the U.S. Census should include a citizenship question. Although the main purpose of a census according to New York Times is “to determine, b…

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  • Will from North Carolina

    The question “Are you a US citizen?” should definitely be included in any future US census. According to Article 1 Section 2 of the Constitution, the main purpose of the census is to count the number of US citizens in order to correctly determine how many House of Representative seats each state receives. According to Elaine Kamarck and Christine Stenglen, two census research analysts of Brookings Institution in Washington DC, there are currently around ten to twelve million illegal immigrants living in the United States, which makes up around 3.5% of the US population. The number of House seats for each state would be skewed if the numbers of noncitizens are included in the results of the Census. Although there are many noncitizens currently living in the United States, this large group can not be represented in government because of the fact that they are not citizens, and only US citizens are represented in the US government. For this reason, the citizenship question on the census would be solely used to accurately estimate how many US citizens there are in order to correctly divide up the House of Representative seats among the states. Opposers to the citizenship question on the census believe that this is a question used for partisan purposes and that the census is only used simply for statistics of how many people are living in the country. For one, the purpose of the census is explicitly stated in the Constitution to be a tool to determine the number of House seats. Also, to address the opposition’s concern about the question being used for partisanship purposes, how is upholding the Constitution be considered a question of partisanship? To fully uphold the Constitution and get the most accurate results as possible for the census, the question of “Are you a US citizen?” must be added to the census.

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    The question “Are you a US citizen?” should definitely be included in any future US census. According to Article 1 Section 2 of the Constitution, …

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  • kelli from North Carolina

    Think The Vote
    For the past 117 years the United States census has been taking a count of how many people are living in the United States. This is important because the number of inhabitants in each state determines how many representatives to the house that each state gets. This past year the Donald Trump administration presented the idea of adding the question of whether or not the person is a citizen of the United States. Some argue that this may discourage immigrants, especially illegal ones, from completing the census. I disagree with that and think that it is important for the government to know an accurrant population and the total number of citizens.
    The number of inhabitants to the country is an important thing to keep track of for many reasons. But many don’t realize that the number of citizens compared to the population is also important. The government needs to know this because it better equips them to protect minority rights by having an accurate number of the amount of immigrants living here. It’s also key for the government to know how many of the incoming immigrants are on Visas. According to the US Constitution stated in Amendment XIV, that to vote you must be a citizen of the United states. With knowing how many people are voting and how many voters we have the government can do a better job of reinforcing the voting laws and making sure that only citizens were casting their votes.
    With requiring a citizenship question of the US Census, it actually may encourage some inhabitants of our country who are not citizens to become citizens. Even though it may discourage some, it is something that would help the government in many ways. The Census Bureau would just have to make sure they were enforcing that everyone must fill out the census.

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    Think The Vote
    For the past 117 years the United States census has been taking a count of how many people are living in the United States. This is i…

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  • Ashley from North Carolina

    I agree with the fact that the US census should include the question of US citizenship. The New York Times writes, “The data is gathered mainly by sending each household a form to fill out, asking a set of questions about everyone who is living there on a particular date, including their sex, race, age and many other details.” If the census is asking specific questions like these, why shouldn’t they ask about US citizenship, especially if it is for a US census? Keeping in mind the fact that most illegal US immigrants will soon leave, or then become a US citizen, I don’t think it’s a disadvantage to them at all to not be accounted for. As said by the New York Times, “census data is used for a great many other purposes as well, including the allocation of about $900 billion in federal spending each year.” If the census is used for federal funding for Americans, then why should illegal immigrants be counted into that? The New York Times stated, “Opponents say the citizenship question was intended to frighten non-citizens away from participating in the census, whether they were in the country legally or not.” I agree with this statement and think that it is perfectly fine if it scares them off. The census is supposed to be counting the Americans in our country, so with that question scaring off noncitizens, I think that is perfectly fine. It is a census for America for a reason. There is no need for the census to show the number of Americans and non-citizens living in America; there is a big difference between the two, which is not being acknowledged. If Trump wants our census to only account for the US citizens, I think he has every right to. There should be a question on the census stating whether or not you are a US citizen in my opinion.

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    I agree with the fact that the US census should include the question of US citizenship. The New York Times writes, “The data is gathered mainly by s…

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  • Angelina from North Carolina

    I believe the citizenship question is imperative to add to the US Census. The Constitution’s declaration in regards to the US Census states: “ [The] Representatives and direct Taxes shall be [appointed] among the several States which may be included within this Union, according to their respective Numbers, which shall be determined by [including] the whole Number of free Persons, including those bound to Service for a Term of Years, and excluding Indians [who are] not taxed, [and] three fifths of all other Persons”(Article I section ii). This means that all freemen, indentured servants, and ⅗ of slaves per owner were counted towards the population of each state. The one thing that links them together is taxes, and while you may argue slaves didn’t pay taxes, they were considered to be property: thus leading to the taxation of the slave owner that was based on the amount of slaves he owned. In the Constitution, it explicitly states that Native Americans can not be included in the US Census strictly due to the lack of taxation enforced onto them. The purpose of the US Census is to get an accurate count of the population in each of the 50 states; this is done to determine the amount of representatives in the House for each state. These Representatives speak on the behalf of the CITIZENS in their respective state, but since there is no way to discern citizenship through the Census, the records of the people are inaccurate and inflate the representation of immigrants and decrease the influence of actual citizens in our government. And to the people who say the question will deter or discriminate against the minorities from completing their Census forms, the legal minorities are not the target focus; the illegal immigrants are. The citizenship question would be in place to get an accurate reading on the amount of people in the US who can contribute to the political, economical, and governmental aspects of our society, and illegal immigrants have no jurisdiction to have any sort of direct representation in domestic affairs, because they are not apart of the domestic people. I know that may sound harsh or unpassionate, but it is the truth; illegal immigrants have no place deciding the future of our government. Keep in mind this would be the same way that us, as American citizens, would be treated if we were to flee to another country. We would have no right to have any representation in our host country’s government, along with the acknowledgement that even though we may live in that country, we can not be called to hold influence on charges or legal discriminations against us.
    https://www.archives.gov/founding-docs/constitution-transcript
    https://www.ourdocuments.gov/doc.php?flash=false&doc=43&page=transcript
    https://walberg.house.gov/about/how-congress-works

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    I believe the citizenship question is imperative to add to the US Census. The Constitution’s declaration in regards to the US Census states: “ [Th…

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  • Kasey from Virginia

    I think a citizenship question should be included in the U.S. Census. Because the data collected is used to help determine how many representatives are attributed to each state, I feel it is very important to know how many people in the area have a right to vote and will, therefore, be represented in government. Though I understand that it may discourage some immigrants from voting, in some localities, this information could completely alter the estimated population of U.S. citizens that are allowed to participate in our democracy. I do not think our country should shy away from controversial and uncomfortable questions like this, but should do what is best to make our governing body work most accurately and efficiently. A citizenship question is vital to execute this.

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    I think a citizenship question should be included in the U.S. Census. Because the data collected is used to help determine how many representatives ar…

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  • Evan from North Carolina

    The census should include a citizen question because, while we do need to know the amount of inhabitants, we really need to know who will be participating in political events. If we include only the inhabitants then we will be skewing the amount of representatives from each district/region. Since the amount of members in the house are based off population, then it should be counted by citizens not total people. As stated in USA today, the Voting Rights Act needs an accurate count of voting age citizens in each district, this is to have an accurate amount of representatives for each district instead of giving those areas with more non-citizens an advantage. This will also help politicians running for office gauge the amount of individuals they need to appeal to. Also, it will help in presidential elections for vote counting in that the total amount of votes can be compared to the amount of eligible voting age people to see if there may be any outside interference or skewing of any source. According to NY Times the estimate of voting age citizens is enough, but since when is the best option an “estimate” when there is an equally viable option that isn’t hard to obtain. Accurate citizen counts will overall provide a more accurate legislation system while also giving information on how many non-citizens are in the country. Separating the population of these two groups on paper will show how much funding needs to be relocated to take care of citizens and the money needed to provide these services to non-citizens also. While this could offer opportunities for segregation of citizens and noncitizens, if monitored and legislated properly it would provide a better education, health, and law-enforcement service to the communities where both populaces reside.

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    The census should include a citizen question because, while we do need to know the amount of inhabitants, we really need to know who will be participa…

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  • Alayna from Alabama

    In my opinion, future U.S. censuses should contain a citizen question. Though I am skeptical of this, overall I think it would not hurt to have the question in place based on my research. From President Donald Trump’s point of view, it is a good thing to know who the actual American citizens are in the population census.

    According to npr.org, the Census Bureau has gotten citizenship information from people in the U.S. through the American Community Survey for more than a decade. It was then replaced with a census questionnaire after the survey was put in action in 2005. But now, Trump wants to start this process back up again. The Justice Department felt that the question should be included so that the numbers for the census would be more accurate in the amount of Americans eligible to vote. According to The New York Times, The Trump administration says that “ including the citizenship question on census forms was an important part of its efforts to protect the voting rights of the nation’s minority residents.” The President is only trying to do what he feels is best for the country. In reality, the method he is trying to use is the most honest. His goal is to have the most reliable information possible to obtain valid results.

    Although the downside is, “By one government estimate, about 6.5 million people might not have been counted if the citizenship question had appeared on census forms.”(New York Times) This is a huge amount of people that would not be counted and maybe there could be some revisions so that the question is not so closed-ended. Maybe something like, “Do you plan on becoming an American citizen within the next 5 years?” To make it so that people have more options. I also understand that certain illegal immigrants would be fearful of this because they do not want to be deported. “Advocacy groups say the question would cause an undercount of immigrants and racial minorities out of fear the citizenship data could be used for immigration enforcement.” This can cause problems for those immigrants, but for the most part, I think if people are living in America they should become American citizens at some point so that there will be an accurate representation of U.S. citizens for the population census.

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    In my opinion, future U.S. censuses should contain a citizen question. Though I am skeptical of this, overall I think it would not hurt to have the qu…

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  • Eyad from North Carolina

    Yes, I am in favor of the U.S Census including a citizenship question for this decade’s census. Although our government should address the overall population of immigrants of the U.S for future precedents, the 2020 census needs to include the U.S citizenship for the advancement in the government’s elected officials. The United States has recently been a powerhouse of incoming immigrants and vast emigration that will only continue to grow, thus increasing the U.S population size. Article 1 Section 2 of the constitution states “ Representatives and direct Taxes shall be apportioned among the several States which may be included within this Union, according to their respective Numbers, which shall be determined by adding to the whole Number of free Persons, including those bound to Service for a Term of Years,”. It is essential for our nation to continuously expand the total number of elected officials for the House of Representatives. The United States has been referred to as a salad bowl of cultures and ethnicity’s that will only continue to rise and expand throughout the United States. Considering this, we as American’s need to elect leaders who share influence with these growing communities, as long as those who are represented are U.S citizens. The importance of the citizenship question on the 2020 census not only affects the government on a political standpoint but as also as a financial one. The New York Times states that “census data is used for a great many other purposes as well, including the allocation of about $900 billion in federal spending each year”. This funding ranges from public schools to Medicaid and the Department of Transportation. This funding should primarily surround the needs of U.S citizens first, rather than a population of both illegal immigrants and citizens. Only then will we be able to direct the leftover funds that the government has, to issues of immigration and asylum in the United States.

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    Yes, I am in favor of the U.S Census including a citizenship question for this decade’s census. Although our government should address the overall p…

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  • Caleb from North Carolina

    I think that the census question about citizenship should be included. The census purpose is to create a voting district for the election of Senators, House of Representatives along with creating the setup of the electoral college for the next 10 years. Basing the population of the United States of America in order to determine how many electoral votes each state gets along with the number of House of Representatives each state receives. As stated in the national archives “electoral votes are allocated among the States based on the Census”.
    Thus this is a necessary addition to the census since the only people that should be allowed to vote for these positions such as a Congressman or the President of the United States are people who are legal citizens of the United States. If the census’s sole purpose is to set up the voting of these positions anybody that answers “illegal” on the census response should simply not be counted. Due to this leading to the possibility of skewing the power saying that there are more people able to vote in a certain state and giving that state more power than it should based off of the population that is allowed to vote by law. This is the was most of the people of the United States feel as an article from The HIll titled Americans overwhelmingly reject voting rights for undocumented immigrant states “Ninety-one percent of Republicans polled said they opposed giving the right to vote to noncitizens, as did 54 percent of Democrats”. This opposition is the reason that the question should be included. If the legal citizens of the United States believe that the “illegal” or “undocumented” there will be laws passed as the people hold the power in the governemtn and this is evident in this case. There are already 33 states that have enforced voter ID thus leading to illegals to vote and there will likely be more states enacting these laws in the near future. With illegals no longer being able to vote they should have to check the undocumented box in the census as it should be included. Then these undocumented people would not be included in the population numbers and would then give a more accurate electoral college, and more accurate House of Represanatives. Which would make the census more efficient as this would give more accurate results of the voting population.

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    I think that the census question about citizenship should be included. The census purpose is to create a voting district for the election of Senators,…

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  • Owen from North Carolina

    Future United States census’s should contain a question asking the citizenship status of that person finding out if they are illegal or not. Although some may say that the census’s sole purpose is just to find out the whole population of the United States to determine the representatives each state gets in the house of representatives. This question would greatly help the US government to know the ratio of legal and non-legal citizens. According to Trump’s administration, this was an important part of its efforts to protect the voting rights of the nation’s minority residents. His point of view is that the more minorities that take part in this census will be able to have more representatives because the population size will be viewed as greater. This question will also help the United States government by knowing how well their borders are in only letting in people legally and not illegally. Over time this would allow them to test out new regulations and rules on immigration and see if they are effective going by the ten-year increments created by this question. Trump also argued that since this complex and very expensive census document it would be relatively cheap and harmless and it would only benefit the country. After the question was revoked in the supreme court Trump tweeted the following: “Can anyone really believe that as a great Country, we are not able the ask whether or not someone is a Citizen, Only in America!”. The first amendment of the United States constitution is the right to free speech, the amendment is the perfect reason why this question should be adopted into the census. You have the right to be able to respond to the question truthfully according to the constitution without the punishment of the United States government. This question should be added to the census because it increases the amount of political power of minorities, it is relatively cheap and easy, and it only benefits the United States.

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    Future United States census’s should contain a question asking the citizenship status of that person finding out if they are illegal or not. Althoug…

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  • Luis from Texas

    I believe that there should be a citizenship question on the census to further analyze data more accurately for the U.S.

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  • Bailey from North Carolina

    Yes, future U.S. Censuses should contain a citizenship question because it would protect political rights of the minorities of America. Although including the census question would deter immigrants from participating in the census, including the citizenship question would be beneficial to allowing minorities to have equal political rights.
    Protecting the rights of minorities has been a discussion since early American history, and is valued greatly by the American public. According to an article I read from the “New York Times”, “What You Need To Know About The Citizenship Question and the Census”, it suggested that including the citizenship question would protect the voting rights of the minority citizens in America. This would provide for a greater, diverse country, allowing for a better democracy to form among the U.S..
    Having the additional question about citizenship on the Census would also benefit minorities by ending dicrimination among politics. The “New York Times” article also suggested that having the citizenship question on the Census would enforce the Voting Rights Act, which stated that discrimination against racial or language minority groups would not be allowed during elections. Enforcing the Voting Rights Act would encourage minorities to vote more and have more of an opinion when it comes to American politics. Adding on the citizenship question would benefit America in creating a better country by allowing minorities to voice their opinion and have equal voting privileges as American citizens.
    Although adding the citizenship question to the U.S. Census could deter immigrants from participating in the Census, adding on the question would more likely encourage immigrants and minorities to vote. Minorities and immigrants may feel intimidated by this question, but by allowing them to obtain the same voting rights they would have compared to American citizens, allows for encouragement in participating in elections. This would create more diversity and significantly increase democracy in the U.S.. Minorities would feel heard and important to American society by adding on the citizenship question to the U.S. Census.

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    Yes, future U.S. Censuses should contain a citizenship question because it would protect political rights of the minorities of America. Although inclu…

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  • Elijah from North Carolina

    I am of the belief that college fees should be lowered, or at the very least made more accessible. According to Zack Friedman, CEO of a personal finance company, states that “There are 45 million borrowers who collectively owe more than $1.5 trillion in student loan debt in the U.S.”. The glaring issue with the collective debt is that it is only going to deepen with more and more generations seeking financial assistance in further education. I don’t personally believe that free college should be provided, as it not only would it drain the national treasury in clearing the 1.5 trillion dollar debt, it would undoubtedly require increased taxes that would ultimately be less beneficial. Though increased scholarship value or opportunities would suit to reduce the cost and financial strain. I personally believe that would be the optimal solution, as many people could suffer up to $100,000 worth of student loan debt, this is ultimately what I fear when the idea of attending college. Of course there are many options to reduce the overall cost, for example agreements between community colleges, and the privatized colleges that permit students to transfer basic courses, Math 101, 201, etc. and continue their courses at another college. This is an extremely powerful option that allows students to not only get the same level of education, but at a much cheaper cost, and have the ability to still transfer to a specialized school for their specific paths in life. Another amazing program is allowing highschool students to take advanced placement courses, as well as community college courses, allowing people to further cut down on the loan debts. Of course this sounds like opportunity after opportunity in to reduce costs, but yet another problem is when these extremely intelligent students take these courses and become the educators of the future. The teachers that are forced to pay for these fees have their already limited pay checks reduced because they teach the next generations. In short I advocate for reduction of college fees, or less financially straining options for those who seek to further their education.

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    I am of the belief that college fees should be lowered, or at the very least made more accessible. According to Zack Friedman, CEO of a personal finan…

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  • Rebeckah from Texas

    The census should be based on legal citizens of the United States. The government needs to know the correct population, based on true citizens for legal purposes and how many representatives are needed, etc. Illegals should not be counted because they can not vote, and would cause many troubles regarding legality issues. Taking the population of citizens and non-citezens would be like taking the population of New Orleans during Mardi Gras. It would be incorrect and inappropriately representative of the city.

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    The census should be based on legal citizens of the United States. The government needs to know the correct population, based on true citizens for leg…

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    • Adam from Colorado

      I disagree with this for a few reasons. A census is simply to gather information, not that of only citizens. Population density is one thing that would be changed by this, as it simply annuls the residents who are not citizens, even though they may own homes and purchase things from their community. I voted yes, though, because I think it is important to fight miseducation.

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      I disagree with this for a few reasons. A census is simply to gather information, not that of only citizens. Population density is one thing that woul…

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  • Brady from Kentucky

    Yes, the census should have a question about citizenship because censuses are supposed to accurately portray the amount of citizens we have in the country. In response to the illegal immigrant self-incrimination or lie argument, if Illegal immigrants have to lie on a census to remain in the country, then that tells you that they shouldn’t be in the country since they are breaking the law. If we allow people to break the law for residency and remain in the country, then why should we follow any other laws? In saying that, however, there are some legal immigrants or foreigners that are in the process of gaining legal residency and are in accordance with immigration law, so then census writers should include an answer to account for that. Ultimately, the citizenship question on a census highlights the underlying problem with illegal immigrants in America with over 10 million immigrants residing in the US illegally and taking advantage of American welfare programs at the cost of the American taxpayer. However, accuracy should remain at the forefront of the solution to maintain the integrity of congressional districts and US elections.

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    Yes, the census should have a question about citizenship because censuses are supposed to accurately portray the amount of citizens we have in the cou…

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  • Osmond from Virginia

    Yes, because this will allow a chance for more people to speak on and vote on citizenship.

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  • Chase from Virginia

    I believe the census should contain a citizenship question because what it would enable the government to do is understand how many people are U.S. Citizens and how many are illegal. This way, the government could find the illegals and put them through a citizenship process to make them citizens or take them out of the country. This would also allow the government to compensate distributing grants and other policies around the United States based on how many people are citizens, and how many other people there are that also need help. The census was designed to take an accurate number of people in the United States, not the ones who are not supposed to be there. So it would make sense to include this question so accurate data is taken.

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    I believe the census should contain a citizenship question because what it would enable the government to do is understand how many people are U.S. Ci…

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  • Luke from Kentucky

    Yes because the censuses vote would only consist of true Americans. This would exclude the illegal immigrants from other countries. We would want an accurate reading of our true country’s population. America would look a lot bigger if illegal immigrants voted on the census. This would then lead to false numbers on the census, giving us a fake identity on the actual number of our United States’ citizens.

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    Yes because the censuses vote would only consist of true Americans. This would exclude the illegal immigrants from other countries. We would want an…

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  • Jefferson from Virginia

    It is supposed to figure out who is a citizen, and who isn’t. If people are here illegally, they shouldn’t be counted in the census and deported back to wherever they came from after a fair trial. IF you’re here legally, you have nothing to fear.

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    It is supposed to figure out who is a citizen, and who isn’t. If people are here illegally, they shouldn’t be counted in the census and deported back…

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  • Aiden from Kentucky

    I think that the United States government should add a citizenship question on the census. The census should be used to calculate the number of legal, taxable citizens in the United States. As a country, the US should also have a good idea of how many non-citizens are residing here. However, I do not believe that this question should be used for deportation purposes or for any other purpose than counting the amount of people residing here and tax information.

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    I think that the United States government should add a citizenship question on the census. The census should be used to calculate the number of legal,…

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  • Ashley from Kentucky

    I do think there should be a citizenship question included in censuses. This question isn’t to keep people away from our country or to make people feel unwanted or guilty if they are still working to get their citizenship, it just provides a more accurate census as it should only include real, verified US citizens. With this though, there should be no penalty for answering the question honestly because all the census is doing is counting the number of people in the country. By knowing how many people are citizens and how many people are just living here, the country will be more capable of distributing resources to different organizations for the betterment of everyone who is in our country.

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    I do think there should be a citizenship question included in censuses. This question isn’t to keep people away from our country or to make people f…

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  • Trevour from Texas

    I agree because it would only give more information on future demographics as well. Although the census could shift the balance of power in the House of Representatives a question on citizenship wouldn’t change anything. I know that adding the citizenship question would affect the participation of the census nearly 6.5 million people might not participate in the Census.

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    I agree because it would only give more information on future demographics as well. Although the census could shift the balance of power in the House …

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  • Sarah from Kentucky

    I think a question about citizenship should be included about citizenship. Although it may discourage noncitizens from filling out the census, it would help the government to know who lives here legally and who does not. The government should know how many US citizens actually live in the US so they know who can vote or not. The government should be able to enforce its laws about citizenship that everyone should follow.

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    I think a question about citizenship should be included about citizenship. Although it may discourage noncitizens from filling out the census, it woul…

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  • TJ from Kentucky

    Yes the census should contain a citizenship question. The purpose of the census is to determine who is within the country. It is important to know if you are a citizen or not to determine the amount of people that have the ability to vote and distribute house seats in accordance to the population of these citizens throughout the United States. Although people may lie about being a citizen, it is better than assuming that every person is a citizen.

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    Yes the census should contain a citizenship question. The purpose of the census is to determine who is within the country. It is important to know if …

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  • Andrea from Texas

    I agree. I believe that the Consensus should have a citizenship question in order to keep count of the population number. Along with this, it could change voting laws and let non-American citizens vote. As a daughter of immigrants who have come to America and taken the citizenship test, I know that the questions aren’t difficult and they are pretty easy to remember.

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    I agree. I believe that the Consensus should have a citizenship question in order to keep count of the population number. Along with this, it could ch…

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  • Evan from Kentucky

    Yes they should. They should be allowed to ask any questions they want. The key to this should be catching illegal immigrants, and also illegal activities. If you come into this country illegally you should have to answer any question honestly that someone asks you. It’s a gift to life in this country, and we all should feel comfortable answering any question that someone asks us.

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    Yes they should. They should be allowed to ask any questions they want. The key to this should be catching illegal immigrants, and also illegal activi…

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  • Harmony from Texas

    Yes, The census is used to determine how many representatives each state gets in the house. Having non citizens count towards that vote is unfair to the states away from the migrant states. The migrant states would include those with an influx of immigrants such as Texas, California and Florida. Those within the middle of the country, such as Nebraska, don’t get as many migrants so they don’t have that opportunity.

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    Yes, The census is used to determine how many representatives each state gets in the house. Having non citizens count towards that vote is unfair to t…

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  • David from Alabama

    Yes, future U.S. censuses should contain a citizenship question. It would be wise to do this because the government should have data about the people living in america for future references. For example, what if there were immigrants that became terrorists and we didn’t know which immigrants were citizens and which ones were not, The government wouldn’t be able to decipher who is what and therefore it can cause problems as a result.

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    Yes, future U.S. censuses should contain a citizenship question. It would be wise to do this because the government should have data about the people …

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  • Sam from Alabama

    I think that the U.S. Censuses should contain a citizenship question because it would be useful information for the Government to know the amount of citizens in our country compared to no citizens in the country. It would be useful information for the government to have this information.

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    I think that the U.S. Censuses should contain a citizenship question because it would be useful information for the Government to know the amount of c…

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  • Deshun from Texas

    Citizenship can account for the official count of the US population and makes it more accurate.

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  • Halee from Kentucky

    It would be useful information for the government to have considering that you should be a US citizen in order to live here legally. The government needs to know how many people are in the US whether you are a US citizen or not. This would also help the Justice Department when it comes to enforcing the law of voting rights. Even if you aren’t a US citizen, that person should fill it out.

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    It would be useful information for the government to have considering that you should be a US citizen in order to live here legally. The government ne…

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    • Cee from South Dakota

      I agree that citizenship should be a question on the census, but not all people living in America legally are citizens. There are work visas, student visas, and Permanent Residents Cards that allow people to be residents of the US while not being citizens.

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      I agree that citizenship should be a question on the census, but not all people living in America legally are citizens. There are work visas, student …

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    • Adam from Colorado

      I agree with that, but I think that if you can only respond to the census if you are a citizen, it will skew the results.

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    • Tanner from Colorado

      I agree on that, I think it would be well used if the government had that type of information on if you are a legal US citizen or not.

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  • Dane from Kentucky

    I believe that future United States censuses should ask a citizenship question. I believe that each census is drastically off due to the number of illegals in the country. There is no harm to having a citizenship question during a census, as each person should easily be able to answer it. There is only an upside to it and that is catching illegal people within the country. Those of which are taking jobs from actual American citizens. This is a problem and I believe that we need to do something about it. Trump building his wall may help a little, but I doubt to see any drastic changes. Little by little, we will clear illegal people within the country.

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    I believe that future United States censuses should ask a citizenship question. I believe that each census is drastically off due to the number of ill…

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  • Colin from Kentucky

    The point of a census is to gain demographic information about the nation. While some questions may be an invasion of privacy, the status of your citizenship is certainly not. It is a basic piece of information the U.S. government can use in order to suit their policies according to the area’s citizenship. Whether to acknowledge those without citizenship is up to the policy makers.

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    The point of a census is to gain demographic information about the nation. While some questions may be an invasion of privacy, the status of your cit…

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  • Christian from Kentucky

    Yes, there should be a question on citizenship because you need to know how many people are actually citizens in your own country. With this though, there should be no penalty for answering the question because all the census is doing is counting the number of people in the country. By knowing how many people are actual citizens you will be able to report accurate statistics about the country and have a better understanding of what you should do for the country. By knowing how many people are citizens and how many people are just living here, the country will be more capable of distributing resources to different organizations for the betterment of everyone who is in our country.

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    Yes, there should be a question on citizenship because you need to know how many people are actually citizens in your own country. With this though, t…

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  • Sarah from Indiana

    I do think there should be question about citizenship. This question isn’t to keep people away from our country or to make people feel bad if they are still working to get their citizenship, it just provides a more accurate census as it should only include real, verified US citizens. With the increase in illegal immigrants in the last few years, it causes our population numbers to increase but that doesn’t mean that it is an actual representation. It is a confidential piece of information that just makes sure we have an accurate number in the population for delegate representation and for funding in the various government systems.

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    I do think there should be question about citizenship. This question isn’t to keep people away from our country or to make people feel bad if they are…

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  • Allie from Colorado

    I don’t think that U.S censuses should include a citizenship question. This is because the purpose of a census is to get an accurate measurement of people living in each state. It contains the number of people it doesn’t say anything else about the number of “immigrants” It doesn’t say anything about exposing the immigrants/illegal immigrants. If there is a question on the form asking if the person is a citizen, the person wouldn’t want to respond to that question. Therefore could be labeled as one and not be able to be in the country.

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    I don’t think that U.S censuses should include a citizenship question. This is because the purpose of a census is to get an accurate measurement of …

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  • Elizabeth from Colorado

    There is a growing number of undocumented immigrants in the country, and we need to know about them. The government needs to know how many people are in the country, and they will have no idea if they go and exclude such a large group.

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    There is a growing number of undocumented immigrants in the country, and we need to know about them. The government needs to know how many peo…

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  • Rohan from Arizona

    From the number of schools to the amount of infrastructure needed per state and the federal funding for such project the federal Government looks to the numbers displayed by the Census to apportion the budget effectively among the fifty states that need the money and by including immigrants in such a census we lead to the free-rider problem due to the fact that these immigrants don’t pay any income taxes, thus leading to a public upheaval about the ethicality of such a measure for it angers the people who actually have to pay taxes. And the biggest thing that angers the American people is taxes, thereby causing massive upheaval: furthermore, if they were to be counted in the census then states would be incentivized to allow these immigrants in because it means more federal funding this severely worsens the immigration problem because once these states start opening their borders a new wave of immigrants will come into the country straining the resources of the country.

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    From the number of schools to the amount of infrastructure needed per state and the federal funding for such project the federal Government looks to t…

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  • Christopher from Georgia

    The census is an extremely important determinant of American policy. The purpose of the census is to count the number of people living in each state for purposes of Congressional apportionment and federal aid. A citizenship question is essential to ensure that Congressional seats are apportioned according to the population of citizens within an area. It makes little sense to apportion Congressional representation based upon the population of noncitizens who cannot participate in elections. Furthermore, not including a citizenship question creates a moral hazard as it encourages states to harbor illegal immigrants, which incentivizes illegal immigrants to make the dangerous treck across the border. Illegal immigrants are subject to extremely dangerous conditions during their trip into the U.S.; it is immoral to incentivize people to put themselves in harms’ way. Additionally, the United States has a right to know how many citizens and noncitizens are living within our borders so as to help give lawmakers the best available information to the merits and effects of a path to citizenship, DACA, increased VISAs, etc. A citizenship question is necessary for the effectiveness of American domestic policy in the 2020s.

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    The census is an extremely important determinant of American policy. The purpose of the census is to count the number of people living in each state f…

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    • Camden from Oklahoma

      America representatives are determined by voting citizens of a geograpic area. It only makes sense to lie if you’re illegal to lie. To avoid deportation. Besides it shouldn’t be federally required to give out so much personal information to the Fed’s.

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      America representatives are determined by voting citizens of a geograpic area. It only makes sense to lie if you’re illegal to lie. To avoid deportati…

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  • Pranay from California

    I think that the census should ask about immigration status, keeping in mind that the individual census responses are confidential for 72 years after they are given. I think that even though the question might appear to be xenophobic on the surface, and even though the motivations behind adding the question itself may also be prejudiced, I still believe that the government should collect this data. It allows us as American citizens to both obtain a greater and better-rounded understanding of our illegal immigration crisis (or possible lack thereof), and it allows the government to create educated decisions when it comes to immigration policy.

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    I think that the census should ask about immigration status, keeping in mind that the individual census responses are confidential for 72 years after …

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    • Allie from Colorado

      I disagree with the first part, since I think the Census should just count everyone in general, no matter if they’re an immigrant or not. I do agree with the second part that, It would be beneficial for the government to collect this data.

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      I disagree with the first part, since I think the Census should just count everyone in general, no matter if they’re an immigrant or not. I do agree w…

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  • Justus from Pennsylvania

    That way, you can still count everyone in the United States, but it allows us to figure out who is and is not a citizen, as well as make sure that only Citizens and Legal Voters are the ones being represented in our House of Representatives and State Legislative Assemblies. Only citizens have a right to vote, only citizens should be counted in districting.

    As I see it, this is a simple, common-sense argument. Anyone here on green cards cannot vote nationally (Some can locally. I know, I know someone with a green card). Illegal “immigrant” aliens deserves absolutely no representation in congress, or say in congress, as they are not legal citizens or legal immigrants.

    Therefore, for accurate distracting and accurate representation of “We the People of the United States of America…” should have citizenship questions.

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    That way, you can still count everyone in the United States, but it allows us to figure out who is and is not a citizen, as well as make sure that onl…

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    • Cade from Colorado

      I agree. I think that since they were not from here they should not have a say in congress.

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    • Anna from Colorado

      I see your point, however this is to get an accurate count of how many people are living in the country. It is not to expose immigrants or get them deported. Without the citizenship question, America would accurately be able to see how many people are living there and make adjustments accordingly. The illegal immigrants are not voting, they are simply counting themselves in that they are living in America, legally or not.

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      I see your point, however this is to get an accurate count of how many people are living in the country. It is not to expose immigrants or get them de…

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  • Tierney from North Carolina

    I believe that the citizenship question should not be included in the 2020 Census. In a country made up of immigrants, targeting such populations is the last thing that should be promoted. The Census is meant to be a non-partisan survey to gather pertinent information about those living in the country. Not only does the information aid in the fair allocation of seats in the House of Representatives and in the division of substantial government funds, but it is Constitutionally mandated to occur every 10 years. The addition of a question asking about the capacity under which an individual is in the United States is inappropriate both due to its discrimination towards minorities and the gerrymandering it encourages.

    The addition of a citizenship question would result in minority groups becoming far less likely to participate in the Census, in turn, causing inaccurate data. While the Citizenship Bureau cannot share any of the information provided, fears of deportation run high among immigrants, especially when directly questioned about one’s citizenship status. Lack of data can cause miscalculations in determining the number of representatives each state requires, resulting in the further misrepresentation of minority groups. Instead of protecting minorities through the Voting Rights Act, the addition of a citizenship question would result in further oppression. Even in the case of those minorities who are unable to vote, options such as campaigning for a particular candidate become inaccessible when those with power do not represent minority beliefs.

    Inaccurate representation of a regions’ beliefs due to lack of response allows for the system to be taken advantage of. According to The New York Times, documentation of plans to gerrymander for the benefit of the Republican party was found following the death of political strategist Thomas B. Hofeller. Gerrymandering occurs when district boundaries are changed in order to benefit a particular party and can greatly damage the voice of minority groups, especially those living in the newly districted areas. As gerrymandering can risk threatening democratic principles, the courts have done what they can to prevent any such occurrences. In some cases, however, justices have felt the issue is too politically based for them to decide, for example the decision in the combined Supreme Court cases Rucho v. Common Cause and Lamone v. Benisek. There was a five to four decision with the majority ruling that the cases could not be decided in federal courts due to their political affiliations. Those who dissented found that courts should be able to rule as the risks to the nation’s system of government were too great to be ignored. Fortunately, when considering adding a citizenship question to the Census, the Supreme Court Justices have been able to rule. In an initial ruling, they found that the question was not viable, yet left the opportunity for further argument open.

    While no further argument took place, I feel that the Supreme Court made the right decision in refusing to allow the citizenship question to be included on the 2020 Census. Not only does this decision protect minorities and prevent gerrymandering, but it also functions to preserve the accuracy of data collected in the census and the fair allocation of government funds.

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    I believe that the citizenship question should not be included in the 2020 Census. In a country made up of immigrants, targeting such populations is t…

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    • Adam from Colorado

      While I agree with some of your points, such as the possible disinterest of minority populations, I think that if there was a federally approved figure which states the number of people that are/aren’t citizens, then it could help in properly representing populations. If Trump says that there are 18 million illegal immigrants, for example, and the census says there is only 2 million, his statement would immediately get shot down, and miseducation would somewhat decrease.

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      While I agree with some of your points, such as the possible disinterest of minority populations, I think that if there was a federally approved figur…

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  • Mikayla from Pennsylvania

    The miscalculation of the census is potentially a multi-billion dollar mistake. Therefore, it is understandable that the federal government wants the most precise survey available. The current move to introduce a citizenship question, however, is a litmus test. For the current president to describe a census as “meaningless” without the inclusion of a citizenship question entirely devalues the integrity of the United States Census. In fact, it further demonstrates ulterior motives on behalf of the conservative party to use the platform of a census to intimidate dissenters. This is seen as a citizenship question disproportionately targets Hispanic and Latinx communities especially in communities like New York City. That explains the staunch opposition offered by New York Attorney General Letitia James in response to the racist undertones of the inclusion of this question. Even in the words of Chief Justice Roberts, a known conservative, “The sole stated reason–seems to have been contrived. We are presented, in other words, with an explanation for agency action that in incongruent with what the record reveals about the agency’s priorities and decisionmaking process.” In other words, as Hispanic voters trend towards voting for democrats, Roberts identifies the citizenship question as a step towards devaluing and undercounting the population size of largely Hispanic communities. Thus, areas with higher Hispanic populations will have less congressional representation.

    Even further, the ramifications of intimidating Hispanic households not only skews data, but it also leads to inaccurate funding for hospitals and schools. In turn, this move leads to Hispanic communities having a lower standard of healthcare and education. Especially considering the different statuses that people living in America can have beyond citizenship–visa, green card holder, permanent resident, refugee, asylum seeker, DACA recipient–this can deter legal residents alongside illegal immigrants. As quoted from Justice Beyers, this move would violate the Administrative Procedure Act by, “undermining public confidence in the integrity of our democratic system itself.” Without contest, the inclusion of a citizenship question does undermine the purpose and function of a census along with alienating a huge portion of the constituency.

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    The miscalculation of the census is potentially a multi-billion dollar mistake. Therefore, it is understandable that the federal government wants the…

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  • Jaquelyn from Texas

    That’s personal info. A census is supposed to count how many people are in the country to better understand what they(the gov’t.) need to do. Regarding how many more schools, hospitals, and other gov’t. jobs.

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    That’s personal info. A census is supposed to count how many people are in the country to better understand what they(the gov’t.) need to do. Regardi…

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  • Scott from South Dakota

    The purpose of the census is to gather an accurate count of people in this country. Adding a citizenship question would only scare people away from filling out the census – thus giving us an inaccurate count

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    The purpose of the census is to gather an accurate count of people in this country. Adding a citizenship question would only scare people away from fi…

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  • Tyler from California

    The U.S. Censuses should not contain a citizenship question on the grounds that it will likely backfire and not achieve the goal of the President and Department of Justice. The testimony from the ACLU suggests that many families will simply not answer the census, answer it incompletely or lie out of fear. The Voting Rights Act of 1965 was the original evidence by the Trump administration but it was rejected by SCOTUS due to the fact it was found to be contrived. The working argument was focused around congressional districting instead of banning different forms of voter discrimination which the opposition believes will directly correlate to the benefit of Republican officials.

    The fact that it is indeed illegal for the Census Bureau to release the information gathered every 10 years, that law has been violated in the past and has the potential to be done again if America still has pro-war intentions in the future. The discrimination of Japanese-Americans in the early 1900’s in using census data can again be used in turn for Mexican-Americans which make a large percentage of the US immigration rate, either documented or undocumented. The fear that the question would be used for immigration enforcement and therefore possible deportation is already prevalent in communities with a high POC residency.

    Previous censuses up until 1950 included the question but then did reappear till 2000 when it was only in long-form census. This proposed executive order would require it to be answered by each household which wouldn’t necessarily align with the cultural climate of the public’s current mindset. The census has also changed in instances regarding race (e.g. the creation of “Asian or Pacific Islander” and “Hispanic”) specifically so it is not steadfast but the Trump administration has a record of being anti-immigration especially towards Muslim-Americans and Mexican-Americans.

    Allow the order wasn’t able to be followed through due to the deadline for printing the census and the scramble for a new approach besides the Voting Rights Act doesn’t mean that it can’t be implemented in 2030 but overall it shouldn’t be included in the census mostly due to the fact that it allows for gerrymandering of congressional districts and the explicit strengthening of the Republican Party. The UN is on record stating that adding a citizenship question to the census is a recommended practice which many countries such as Ireland and Germany have put in place but the difference is that the US is built upon the idea of a “melting pot” that praises diversity and the home of the free.

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    The U.S. Censuses should not contain a citizenship question on the grounds that it will likely backfire and not achieve the goal of the President and …

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  • Valerie from California

    The census was created to ensure a fair distribution of representatives towards each state based on population and determine the total number of individuals living in the United States. Including a citizenship question in the census would discourage immigrants from participating in the census and would exclude a large amount of the nation’s population and communities of minorities. Otherwise, census results would be inaccurate for those answering falsely. If the question were to be found on the census, very few would answer out of fear.

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    The census was created to ensure a fair distribution of representatives towards each state based on population and determine the total number of indiv…

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  • Jared from Pennsylvania

    No, I think the United States Census shouldn’t add a question regarding legal citizenship or not. If we attempted to add the question, individuals can easily get around the question by lying about it. Also, this question might produce fear which will result in less people participating.

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    No, I think the United States Census shouldn’t add a question regarding legal citizenship or not. If we attempted to add the question, individuals can…

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  • Aziz from Pennsylvania

    No, No, No, that is way too personal, the government should use the census to see how many things they should need. For example, say the Lehigh County has 100,000 people and only 2 hospitals. The government should see that and do the right thing and build more resources we need. The government is doing a bad job.

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    No, No, No, that is way too personal, the government should use the census to see how many things they should need. For example, say the Lehigh County…

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  • Emma from Pennsylvania

    No, future U.S. Censuses should not contain a citizenship question. The census is mainly for a total count of the population of the United States. By containing a citizenship question many people may fear for deportation and not fill out the census giving an inaccurate total of the population. The Census is very important to the government because it determines how many members of Congress a state has, federal funding and congressional redistricting. If immigrants do not fill out the census, the state can representatives.

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    No, future U.S. Censuses should not contain a citizenship question. The census is mainly for a total count of the population of the United States. By …

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  • Isabella from Pennsylvania

    No. The census should not include a citizenship question. By definition, a census is a complete count of a population, and the population includes everyone who lives in the country. An argument for this that you have probably heard before is that a citizenship question in the census form would discourage immigrants who are not citizens from completing it, and I agree. I can speak only for myself, but if I were an immigrant and not a citizen, I would not fill out the census form at all out of fear of being deported or any other punitive measures that could be taken against my family or me. I believe that if the government tried, just once, sending out a census with such a question included, responses would come back that would nearly all contain the answer “Yes.”
    Because immigrants, whether or not they are legally in this country, are part of the population, they are also affected by the results of the census. According to the United States Census Bureau (census.gov) numbers obtained by the census are used to determine the amount of federal funds granted to each community, state, or region. These funds are usually used for public services that everyone benefits from, such as hospitals, infrastructure, and public works. Additionally, local governments need the census count to be as accurate as possible in case of emergency or danger to the public.
    When the Supreme Court blocked the citizenship question in its 2019 decision, Justice Clarence Thomas stated in his dissenting opinion, “For the first time ever, the Court invalidates an agency action solely because it questions the sincerity of the agency’s otherwise adequate rationale.” Justice Thomas disagrees with the majority’s statement that the reasons provided to support including a citizenship question seem to be made up solely for the purpose of getting the question through to the census. This was stated because minorities tend to vote for Democrats, whereas Caucasians tend to vote for Republicans. Under a Republican administration, this suspicion is certainly reasonable. The Republicans took great offense upon the releasing of that statement by the majority on the Court, but I do not believe it is to be taken personally—the Court is merely taking precautions to ensure equality between political parties. The Court, in my opinion, ruled this way for the same reasons gerrymandering is prohibited—to ensure that one party has no preventable advantage over the other. For these reasons, a citizenship question should continue to be blocked by the Supreme Court from being included in the decennial census.

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    No. The census should not include a citizenship question. By definition, a census is a complete count of a population, and the population includes eve…

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  • Clayton from Tennessee

    Asking whether someone in the nation is a US citizen or not should not be allowed onto the upcoming census. This not only encourages its uses in shady gerrymandering in support of Republican party members but also directly discriminates minorities in our country.
    This question will result in widespread fear within the immigrant population of America and cause inaccurate data to be pulled from the upcoming census. This lack of data can cause a little representation for many immigrants and people of color in America.
    Census Data is used to redraw districts based on the population of the people in those areas. Evidence to use this for the increasing power in the Republican party was seen in documents found in the belongings of political strategist Thomas B. Hofellar, who passed in 2018. This use of the census is known as gerrymandering, which occurs when the districts are redrawn to aid a certain party. If districts are redrawn with the usage of this question in the census, many minorities will lose their voices
    The lack of this question aids the safety and rights of immigrants and people of color, ensures a more accurate data set and fights the uses of gerrymandering in the government.

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    Asking whether someone in the nation is a US citizen or not should not be allowed onto the upcoming census. This not only encourages its uses in shady…

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  • Cherise from South Dakota

    I say that the U.S. should NOT put a citizenship question into the census because if that does happen then it’s basically singling out the illegal immigrants that want to stay in this country. Another reason we shouldn’t put in a question is because, at least to me, it goes against the “U.S. moral standards”. When I say “moral standards” I’m talking about the Bill of Rights. The fifth amendment exists for a reason. “No person shall be held to answer for a capital, or otherwise infamous crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of a Grand Jury…” this is saying that we have the right to refuse to answer a question if that question leads to us incriminating ourselves.

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    I say that the U.S. should NOT put a citizenship question into the census because if that does happen then it’s basically singling out the illegal imm…

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  • Naomi from South Dakota

    I do not believe that there should be a citizenship question included in the U.S. Censuses . I believe this because the reason we have the censuses is to gather information about our country. While knowing if people are citizens of the country or not is important and may be necessary, it is not needed. knowing if someone is a citizen is an extra piece of information to have. The overall purpose of the censuses should be to gather knowledge of the country and how we are able to better our country, putting the question of citizenship on the censuses would be a coin toss of how it would be used. Some may use it to see numbers of people who are legal and not and help the people who are illegal to become legal, some may use that power to deport, make life harder possibly even split up families over this. There is a lot of power that would come with asking that question, and we do not know how some will use it.

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    I do not believe that there should be a citizenship question included in the U.S. Censuses . I believe this because the reason we have the censuses i…

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  • Kyle from South Dakota

    Even if the question were to be added, many immigrants who decide to answer the census will most likely lie about their citizenship. People lie, it’s in our human nature. One simple little answer saying yes, I am a citizen of the United States, and you don’t have to worry about anything. This question could force many people to go into hiding in a way, because if they don’t do the census, they’re practically hidden. Some immigrants already try to hide the fact that they illegally entered the United States, and with this question on the census, they defiinetely won’t take it.

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    Even if the question were to be added, many immigrants who decide to answer the census will most likely lie about their citizenship. People lie, it’s …

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  • Selvera from Texas

    the censuses is supposed to count the amount of people that live in a household , a citizenship question being added to the censuses would be dumb and irrelevent.

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  • Daniel from Alabama

    No because it would further deter illegal aliens from registering, thus undermining the analysis of the data, as a portion of the population would not be shown on census records.

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  • Terri from Texas

    I said no because the Census should be about the number of inhabitants that are living in the country. Which they made the immigrants be targeted in such population of their country.

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    I said no because the Census should be about the number of inhabitants that are living in the country. Which they made the immigrants be targeted in s…

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  • Keyana from New York

    The citizenship question should not be included in the 2020 Census or any census to come. Everyone in the country of America is either an immigrant or the descendant of an immigrant unless a fully blooded Native American asking such a question would encourage the xenophobic feelings which already exist in this country. Everyone is illegal in stolen land. We learn from history that we don’t learn from history, maybe it’s time we start. If we take a look back at the Holocaust the Jewish people were asked by authorities to show their papers to prove citizenship because according to the Germans they were illegal, they didn’t belong there. On the Statue of Liberty it says “Give me your tired, your poor, Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, The wretched refuse of your teeming shore, Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to me, I lift my lamp beside the golden door!” Why don’t we live by our words and stop making differences between native born Americans and Immigrants, citizens or not.

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    The citizenship question should not be included in the 2020 Census or any census to come. Everyone in the country of America is either an immigrant or…

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  • Shelby from Virginia

    I do not believe that the census should have a citizenship question, because that will most likely cause the US population to be undercounted. The whole purpose of the census is to get an accurate count of the people living in America, so with this question the census will be less effective at doing this. Additionally, as the CNN article states, this would give republicans an advantage when drawing district lines, because the non-citizens (who are typically liberal) would not be accounted for.

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    I do not believe that the census should have a citizenship question, because that will most likely cause the US population to be undercounted. The who…

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  • Jack from North Carolina

    The purpose of a census is to find out the population of a country. This includes citizens and non-citizens therefore the U.S. census should not include questions about citizenship.

    The main argument for having a citizenship question is that it would help the government to determine how many people will be voting in order for them to effectively enforce the voting rights act. The votings rights act “bars discrimination against racial or language minority groups in the conduct of elections,” according to the New York Times. This argument is irrelevant because the Government already has an accurate enough estimate of votes to be able to enforce this act.

    One aspect of the citizenship question is that it might deter some from participating in the census. According to the New York Times an estimated 6.5 million people may not take part in the census if the citizenship question appeared. While this number seems insignificant when compared to America’s population, it could alter the number of electoral votes and house seats each state gets which is paramount in the election.

    All in all, the inclusion of a citizenship question on the National census is utterly pointless and would hurt the accuracy in terms of population estimates of the census.

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    The purpose of a census is to find out the population of a country. This includes citizens and non-citizens therefore the U.S. census should not inclu…

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  • Riley from Arizona

    I believe that the unnecessary addition of this question to the US Census is simply a waste of time for those answering and does nothing to help our country. Personally speaking, the government should not seek to personally target certain groups of people within our country. I completely understand that immigration and legality of citizens are very heated topics in modern society, however, I do not think that the US Census is the place to try to fix these issues. There is nothing that could guarantee that the person filling out the Census would be truthful, which would only give the government useless, inaccurate information to waste their time thumbing through. I do agree that these issues need to be addressed, that our current system needs to be fixed in certain areas, but doing it in this way is not the most effective. To save precious time, focus on more important topics and actually solving the problems at hand, we should not add this question to the Census.

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    I believe that the unnecessary addition of this question to the US Census is simply a waste of time for those answering and does nothing to help our c…

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  • Elijah from Kansas

    The census is a critical part of the American government, not only does it give lawmakers an accurate headcount of the population but, it provides the information for how much funding a community receives, their representation in congress, which in turn affecting their electoral votes.

    Established early on in the constitution, the census was at the front of the founders mind, located in Article 1 Section 2 of the constitution it states “Representatives and direct Taxes shall be apportioned among the several States which may be included within this Union, according to their respective Numbers…” this would later set the 10-year terms of the census.

    There will only be as much funding to a community as the number of people in it who completed the census.

    There are already many legal Americans who are concerned by the census, in fear it is giving the government personal information that they would use against them. So if not all legal American citizens are comfortable with the census how can we expect an illegal immigrant to feel when answering the census? This is putting states with a high population of non-citizens at risk of losing representation in congress and crucial federal funding.

    It can be argued that only citizens should count because they are the ones who are paying taxes. But, if the results of the census are incorrect then a county where a large number of people refused to answer the census may be underfunded and unable to care for the needs of its people, citizen or not.

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    The census is a critical part of the American government, not only does it give lawmakers an accurate headcount of the population but, it provides the…

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  • Alex from South Dakota

    The question stated above should not be included for various reasons. the first being it could be used to hunt down illegal immigrants around the country. The second being that if an illegal saw this question, they would not complete the Census and skew the numbers completely.

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    The question stated above should not be included for various reasons. the first being it could be used to hunt down illegal immigrants around the coun…

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  • Emma from South Dakota

    I think that the citizen question is very unneeded, The US census is used to count how many people are in the US not to show how many of them live here legally or not. Plus on top of that, would you openly tell the government if u were asked to? I didn’t think so. This question could really through off statistics that are very important to the US as a whole and adding this question doesn’t prove or help anything for american but causes inaccuracy instead.

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    I think that the citizen question is very unneeded, The US census is used to count how many people are in the US not to show how many of them live her…

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  • Nevaeh from South Dakota

    I don’t think it will help the justice department as much as people who voted yes thought it would. I think it shouldn’t matter if you are an illegal immigrant or not because no matter who you are you if you live here, you still live here and everyone should be able to express their opinions or choices. It is wrong for the government to even have a vote about this because if they pictured themselves in the other person’s shoes they wouldn’t like feeling neglected or feeling like they don’t belong.

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    I don’t think it will help the justice department as much as people who voted yes thought it would. I think it shouldn’t matter if you are an illegal …

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  • SIerra from South Dakota

    I don’t think there should be a question because it would just cause more trouble and more drama. I also believe that the people who aren’t U.S citizens should be able to stay and have the same right.

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    I don’t think there should be a question because it would just cause more trouble and more drama. I also believe that the people who aren’t U.S citize…

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  • Joel from South Dakota

    No, because if the purpose of the Census is to count how many people live in the US and to appoint different representatives to each state. And an illegal immigrant, who is scared of getting deported, doesn’t fill out the form. It would then give you an inaccurate number of how many people are in the US. Therefore, defeating the purpose of the Census.

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    No, because if the purpose of the Census is to count how many people live in the US and to appoint different representatives to each state. And an ill…

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  • Caliann from South Dakota

    I think that we shouldn’t put a citizenship question because what information we want to receive from the census is how many people are currently living in the U.S. And illegal immigrants probably won’t do the census out of fear for being deported. We are not trying to tell who in our country is a legal citizen or not we want to gauge the population of our country and states so we can better help our communities.
    Also, the census is a crucial part of deciding how many people each state gets in the house of representatives to properly represent each state in the house, so it doesn’t matter if you are a legal citizen of the united states or not.

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    I think that we shouldn’t put a citizenship question because what information we want to receive from the census is how many people are currently livi…

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  • kennah from South Dakota

    if you put the citizenship question on the census it will discourage undocumented immigrants from filling out the Census and the most of the point of the census is to basically take a head count in the U.S. , the test should be used simply to count the number of inhabitants living in the country. Anything else about citizenship, this side claims, would be included for partisan purposes.

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    if you put the citizenship question on the census it will discourage undocumented immigrants from filling out the Census and the most of the point of …

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  • Bailey from South Dakota

    I believe that the citizenship question should not be included in the 2020 census because it’s basically targeting one specific group of people, Immigrants, and these Immigrant know that they are being targeted at which will cause them to not fill out this census, and if the census isn’t filled out we will have a false amount of people in the United States

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    I believe that the citizenship question should not be included in the 2020 census because it’s basically targeting one specific group of people, Immi…

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  • Eliana from South Dakota

    While I do understand that some people do truly think that this citizenship question is for the best, I feel as though the reasoning behind the suggested law is a lie. With how much controversy there has been regarding immigrants and such and the Trump administration seems to be very against them, it is in poor taste to suggest a question like this and not expect strong pushback and drama.

    Another point I have to make, which my teacher has also brought up and I think is very important, is that those who are here illegally live nearly every day afraid of being found out. The point of a census is the find out the number of people in the country, not who is allowed to be here. Chances are, illegal immigrants are likely to not fill out the census if they are afraid of discovery.

    Finally, as I said above, the point of a census is to find the number of people who are in your country. We can deal with immigrants later–right now, we should just be concerned about the first part.

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    While I do understand that some people do truly think that this citizenship question is for the best, I feel as though the reasoning behind the sugges…

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  • ANiya from South Dakota

    I think that the question “Are you a citizen of the USA” should not be apart of the Censuses because I feel that it will cause people who are not citizens of the USA to not want to do it. It might also make them feel as if they are targeted.

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    I think that the question “Are you a citizen of the USA” should not be apart of the Censuses because I feel that it will cause people who are not citi…

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  • JayLynn from South Dakota

    I think the question shouldn’t be on the Censuses because if there not legal then they don’t want to fill it out cause they might be scared that they will be deported. Some people also might not feel comfortable answering this question.

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    I think the question shouldn’t be on the Censuses because if there not legal then they don’t want to fill it out cause they might be scared that they …

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  • Nate from South Dakota

    I think that the Census should not contain a citizenship question because it will turn away immigrants from filling out forms. This is important because we need to keep a steady and constant number on the amount of people we have in our country. If people are not filling out these forms then we have a incorrect population count.

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    I think that the Census should not contain a citizenship question because it will turn away immigrants from filling out forms. This is important becau…

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  • Dace from South Dakota

    I don’t think that we should add this for the sake of all of our non-american friends and family that we may lose. If we add this one people would not want to take it if they are not a citizen. But if the government tries to remove everyone we would have a big downfall in our population which I don’t think would be a very good thing to have for our economy.

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    I don’t think that we should add this for the sake of all of our non-american friends and family that we may lose. If we add this one people would not…

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  • Julian from South Dakota

    The census is (mainly) to count how many people are living in the US, not how many legal citizens are in the country.

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  • Jenna from South Dakota

    I don’t think they should because they ask for residents in general, not legal residents, they may not be legal but they’re still residents and should be apart of the demographics because they’re just like us, just not legal citizens. They came here probably because their countries aren’t safe and putting the citizen question may just scare them into thinking they’re going to get deported, probably because that’s what’ll happen and that would be a terrifying and horrible situation to be in, there’s really no point in the question when it’s based on demographics, not citizenship.

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    I don’t think they should because they ask for residents in general, not legal residents, they may not be legal but they’re still residents and should…

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  • Josiah from South Dakota

    I think that we should not have a question like that on the quiz. I think that because of the people who emigrants that do the quiz might not do it because there is that question and then we won’t have the right number of people in the USA.

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    I think that we should not have a question like that on the quiz. I think that because of the people who emigrants that do the quiz might not do it be…

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  • Chase from South Dakota

    I don’t think that a citizenship question should be added to the Censuses because I think that this question would be used to find illegal immigrants. Also, if somebody is in America illegally why would they fill the censuses form out so that it will give an inaccurate amount of humans within the U.S. borders.

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    I don’t think that a citizenship question should be added to the Censuses because I think that this question would be used to find illegal immigrants….

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  • Destine from Virginia

    I say no to this topic. In the situation about us counting our population is a great way. I just don’t think that they have to include their country if they were not born here. I say that they just count how many and move on.

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    I say no to this topic. In the situation about us counting our population is a great way. I just don’t think that they have to include their country i…

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  • Aliyah from South Dakota

    The future U.S. Census should not contain a citizenship question because the main goal of the U.S Census is to count how many people are in the United States. According to The New York Times, “Under the Constitution, once every 10 years the federal government is required to count every person in the country”. The goal of the Census is to count every single person in the U.S., not just legal citizens. If we added the citizen question, many people won’t fill the Census for a wide variety of reasons, for example, being found and deported, and we will not get an accurate population count of the country.

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    The future U.S. Census should not contain a citizenship question because the main goal of the U.S Census is to count how many people are in the United…

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  • Hannah from California

    Although adding a citizenship question would assist the government in determining the citizenship status of Americans and the legality that comes with it, the omission of a citizenship question allows for a continued understanding of America as a country of immigrants. According to the United States Census Bureau, the census “…asks questions of people in homes and group living situations, including how many people live or stay in each home, and the sex, age and race of each person. The goal is to count everyone once, only once, and in the right place.” It was decided by those who curated the Constitution that population would become the basis for things such as number of representatives and the proportion of direct taxes. This idea is even outline in the Constitution under Article 1, Section 2.
    The exclusion of the question also reinforces the idea of America being a country of immigrants. The census records information such as race, gender, age, etc. to get an appropriate count and makeup of the population. Citizenship shouldn’t be a factor in this count, as it interferes with the identity of the person, which the census is ultimately trying to determine. From personal experience, I come from a family of immigrants. No one in my family has yet been born in America, including myself, having been born in Canada with my parents coming from Canada and England. My father, who hails from England and Canada currently resides in the US under a Green Card. Similar to my father, their are plenty of people in United States who do not currently identify as citizens, but are proud to be/identify as Americans nonetheless. The addition of the question discourages people, such as my father, into thinking they are less American then those who hold citizenship, which is certainly not the case. Some of these people are even more patriotic then those who have resided in the United States their entire lives.
    Ultimately, the omission of the question reinforces core American values based on pride in a nation rather than a passport. The census only comes around every so often, and seeing who makes up our wonderfully diverse country is more important than determining who is a citizen, because Americans are more than just a check-mark next to questions asking so.

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    Although adding a citizenship question would assist the government in determining the citizenship status of Americans and the legality that comes with…

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  • Nikkia from South Dakota

    I don’t think we should add a citizenship question because adding the question isn’t going to help with the census, all it’s going to tell you is whether people paid attention in school or if they’re uneducated. Since the question isn’t going to help them determine the population it isn’t worth the uproar. Also, it could work against us and fewer people may take the census which isn’t going to give us accurate information on our population.

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    I don’t think we should add a citizenship question because adding the question isn’t going to help with the census, all it’s going to tell you is whet…

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  • Charlie from North Carolina

    The end of a decade marks an important time for a political process as census forms are sent out around the country. In particular the 2020 census was close to adding an important topic for citizens to dive into when filling out the form. Trump’s administration was considering adding an American Citizenship question to the census forms. There are multiple reasons why the government was out of line when considering including a citizenship question. The original constitution in Article one section two states that the federal government is required to count every person in the country. Nothing is stated in the constitution about calculating just American cItizens or eligible voters as the Trump Administration claims as the reason behind this question. This republicans claim, would help enforce Voting Rights Act which “bars discrimination against racial or language minority groups”, according to the New York Times. This one counter argument would certainly not outweigh the blatantly obvious drawbacks of including this question. Foremost, the accuracy of the census data would be severely altered. A government estimate found that 6.5 million people quite possibly would not have participated if the citizenship question was added in. This allotment of people would have negatively affected states such as Arizona, California, Florida, and Texas to name a few, when it came to seats in the House of Representatives. Another important function of the census that would be altered is federal funding. The nearly 900 million dollars is spent with the help of census data on everything from medicaid to highway repairs. Along with this politicians argue that republicans were only trying to shift political boundaries to the party’s advantage when the U.S. begins using the new census to redraw district maps in 2021. This and the fact that the Supreme Court has already ruled against the addition of the question only further solidifies the argument against having the citizenship question. If the census in the future implements a citizenship question not only will the data be skewed by political processes will be in fact negatively affected.

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    The end of a decade marks an important time for a political process as census forms are sent out around the country. In particular the 2020 census was…

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  • Landon from North Carolina

    I do not think that the United States Census should include a citizenship question. This question could be polarizing to immigrants and minorities, discouraging them from filling out the Census. However, the Census best fulfills its purpose when as many people as possible fill it out. If the Census is not accurate, public services and funds may not be distributed properly throughout the United States. Minorities are already underrepresented in the Census, so anything that could lead to their further exclusion should not be added to the Census. There will always be some misrepresentation on the United States Census, so everything in our power must be done in order reduce this as much as possible. This will ensure that our voting districts are as fair and accurate as possible.

    Nonetheless, citizenship status is still important data to gather for things like voter fraud protection. However, according to the United States Census Bureau, the citizenship question is included on the American Community Survey. Therefore, this information is still accounted for, and that there is no reason for a citizenship question to be included on the Census.

    Furthermore, the Constitution simply sets up the Census as a way to determine the amount of Representatives in the House each state gets. Article 1, Section 2 of the United States Constitution states that “The actual Enumeration shall be made within three Years after the first Meeting of the Congress of the United States, and within every subsequent Term of ten Years, in
    such Manner as they shall by Law direct.” Therefore, there is no set amount of information that needs to be collected by the Census other than population, location, and age. The distribution of funds and services really does not have to be based upon Census data, but because it is, full participation is incredibly important.

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    I do not think that the United States Census should include a citizenship question. This question could be polarizing to immigrants and minorities, di…

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  • Jasmine from South Dakota

    I do not think that there should be a citizen ship question. The purpose of them having the census is to document the amount of individuals are in our country and we shouldn’t add it because a lot will feel as if they don’t want to fill it out give inaccurate numbers also many immigrants will feel as though they will be put back to there actual country and not give them a feeling of safety. Although we do have our rules in place I still think if they went through a lot to be here that they should feel safe where they live and not like they are going to be returned somewhere where conditions are terrible.

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    I do not think that there should be a citizen ship question. The purpose of them having the census is to document the amount of individuals are in our…

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  • Harrison from North Carolina

    America is known as the “melting pot” of cultures, people, and races. One thing that America prides itself on is that America is made up of so many different people, when asked what you think of when you hear “American” almost every person’s interpretation of this is different, and this is amazing. However, becoming a citizen is a long and difficult process that requires time and effort, and unfortunately some immigrants do not have this. These people are known as illegal immigrants, and they play directly into the question: “Should the US Census contain a citizenship question?” Currently every 10 years there is a US Census where the population of the United States is totaled so that the number of representatives for each state can be determined. A big question that has arisen is whether or not people should have to answer a question during the census regarding whether or not they are a US citizen. While surrounded by a large amount of controversy I believe that the census should not contain a citizenship question. I believe this for the reasons of people having their privacy, and also because I believe that this was just a ploy by the republicans to gain more legislative advantage. According to the fourth amendment of the constitution people have the right to privacy of their person, house, papers, and any other personal things, and requiring people to answer a private question would be violating their rights. Another reason that I believe they should not ask this question is because it was just a ploy by the republicans to gain more legislative power. According to the New York Times it was found that Thomas B Hofeller, a republicam strategist, wrote a report stating that adding a citizenship question would give republicans a significant advantage in drawing new legislative districts, which could affect how many representatives they have. Due to these reasons I do not believe that a citizenship question should be added to the US census.

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    America is known as the “melting pot” of cultures, people, and races. One thing that America prides itself on is that America is made up of so man…

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  • Jamiah from Mississippi

    It doesn’t matter about the citizens. Everybody should be able to stay. I don’t think it’s wrong for the citizens to stay.

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  • Ariel from Mississippi

    It’s about population because they gone count how many people they got locked up in them cages who ain’t a registered citizen anyway

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  • Paige from North Carolina

    I do not think the citizenship question should be added to the national census. The United State census is a vital process done to determine House of Representative seats and electoral college votes per state, allotment of federal money, etc. The United States Constitution started this process by stating in Article 1, Section 2 that the census will be done every 10 years, and it will include all people residing in the United States. Although the citizenship question will not be included in the 2020 census, confirmed by the US 2020 Census government website, it is still a debate regarding future censuses. If the question is included, it is expected that undocumented citizens will not submit the form, which would therefore alter the census results and could create unfair distribution of house seats, federal goverment money, or anything related to a state’s population. I understand the argument that we need to know how many US citizens the country has to determine information, such as how many eligible voters the US holds, but I think adding the question will do more harm than good. Undocumented people in the United States are already living under the fear of the US Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), so adding this question will only increase their fears, and decrease their chance of turning in the census form. Furthermore, the Supreme Court decided last year in a 5-4 vote that the citizenship question can not be added to the census forms, so if Donald Trump or a future president goes against that ruling, it hinders the democracy our country was founded on. Although it is not illegal for a President to ignore a Supreme Court ruling, and it has been done many times in the past, it breaks the split power of the federal government idea, which has made the United States government and democracy able to survive for over 200 years. The government is corrupt as is, and I believe this would only worsen the conditions.

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    I do not think the citizenship question should be added to the national census. The United State census is a vital process done to determine House of …

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  • Akierateamadejollie from South Dakota

    We should not add a question about citizenship to the Census. While, yes, this would help figure out the citizenship standing of the U.S., the Census is used to count the people living here, not the number of citizens. If the question is added it will discourage immigrants from filling it out, and we will not get a completely accurate answer for the population of the U.S.

    It also goes against the laws of privacy. If a person wishes to live in this country without being a citizen that is their choice, and the government had no right to call them out on it by making them fill out the question when they fill out the Census. People will be discouraged to fill out the Census correctly, leading to incorrect information.

    The Census is meant to be a non-partisan survey to find and collect the number of people living in the U.S. in a country made of immigrants, it’s the last thing we want to do, calling people out for their citizenship status.

    If an area of the country believes strongly that it should be added, people in that state are more likely to fill out the Census correctly than areas that strongly oppose it. This can lead to imbalanced information and unfair distribution of the representatives.

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    We should not add a question about citizenship to the Census. While, yes, this would help figure out the citizenship standing of the U.S., the Census …

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  • Sam from South Dakota

    I do not think that there should be a question of citizenship on the census. This could make some people (immigrants) uncomfortable when asked and discourage them from answering the question or others. This would lead to inaccurate numbers.

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    I do not think that there should be a question of citizenship on the census. This could make some people (immigrants) uncomfortable when asked and dis…

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  • Asher from South Dakota

    I believe that there should not be a citizenship question in any census. If you look at the original purpose of the census, it was only to find how many people live in the area and have some basic information(race, gender, etc.). Although people may say that this could help the issue of illegal immigration, note that people can just lie about being an immigrant. Immigrants might also feel as if they are being hounded by the government, leading to them not wanting to fill out the census. If you really think about it, we are a country of immigrants, coming from all over the place from Great Britain to China. Another problem that would arise from the question being added is that if we don’t have people filling out the census because they are scared, then the balance of power would become even more out of wack. Say for instance, that there was a huge community that was full of immigrants. They didn’t fill out the census because they were scared. Now there is little funding in that area and there is very little representation. This country was built on the people wanting to be represented. If people are too afraid to say what they are, then people won’t get represented. All in all, adding a question on the U.S. Census is a bad idea.

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    I believe that there should not be a citizenship question in any census. If you look at the original purpose of the census, it was only to find how ma…

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  • Jaxon from South Dakota

    I don’t believe that the United States consensus should include a citizenship question. While there is a possibility of finding some illegal immigrants inhabiting the United States, there will be less participation in the consensus. The purpose of the consensus is to gather information and data about households and people in the United States. If citizens choose not to participate due to the possibility of getting caught, it beats the purpose of the consensus. There will also be inaccurate data given because of the lack of participation. We can’t allow one question to alter the outcome of the U.S consensus.

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    I don’t believe that the United States consensus should include a citizenship question. While there is a possibility of finding some illegal immigrant…

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  • Sophie from South Dakota

    I believe that the citizenship question shouldn’t be in the 2020 Census. It would make the immigrants nervous about the form, making them not fill it out. The Census is supposed to gather information over people who live in the country, citizen or not. If this question was added, we may get an inaccurate number of people living in the country. Sure, some people may think of it as useful so we could get a population estimate for the citizens, however, minority and immigrants may not fill out this form, as it may cause discomfort for them.

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    I believe that the citizenship question shouldn’t be in the 2020 Census. It would make the immigrants nervous about the form, making them not fill it …

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  • Nathan from South Dakota

    I believe there shouldn’t be a citizenship question because our country has a lot of undocumented citizens from what I’ve been taught . I agree that if there was a question asking about one’s citizenship it would for sure deter undocumented people living in the US for fear of getting in extremely big trouble for being undocumented.

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    I believe there shouldn’t be a citizenship question because our country has a lot of undocumented citizens from what I’ve been taught . I agree that …

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  • Anden from South Dakota

    No, I do not think that there should be a citizenship question in future US censuses for a few reasons. Firstly, if such a question were to appear on a census form, undocumented immigrants fight not answer the question, or choose to not even complete the census. Secondly, in recent times, our government has tried to grasp onto as many means as possible in order to deport undocumented immigrants, which is not only unfair, but borderline prejudicial. The means in which you enter a country should not matter when you are finding demographic information about the people that live in this country, especially when failure to answer the question would result in inaccurate census data. I also fear that adding this question to US censuses would be used against undocumented immigrants in the future, whether in deportation, or in negative rhetoric.

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    No, I do not think that there should be a citizenship question in future US censuses for a few reasons. Firstly, if such a question were to appear on …

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  • Kadynce from South Dakota

    I think no because if you come to America legally and are a citizen to the United States then you are part of the United States, but if you come to the United States illegally then you are not part of the United States and are therefore not a citizen and not counted as a citizen to this country if you come here illegally and claim that you are a citizen. You can’t claim that you’re a citizen when you come here illegally and are not patent in this country.

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    I think no because if you come to America legally and are a citizen to the United States then you are part of the United States, but if you come to th…

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  • Sean from South Dakota

    I believe that the citizenship question shouldn’t be on the 2020 Census because It’s not going to help the Census it will only mess with proper results because of people with a belief that they will get caught red-handed with not being a citizen will not want to enter the census for the reason of being an illegal immigrant.

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    I believe that the citizenship question shouldn’t be on the 2020 Census because It’s not going to help the Census it will only mess with proper result…

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  • Thomas from South Dakota

    No. I believe that a question like that is unlikely to be answered truthfully or at all by all the people living in this country. A question like this is only useful if it can provide an accurate answer, which is something unlikely with the possible nature of this question. I’m not saying it is an unimportant to know the citizenship status of all living in this country, but this is not the way to do it. In addition to the points I have made previously, a question like this could leave people not filling out the census at all, which would make not only the citizenship status a false data point, but could make all data points false, which directly contradicts the nature of the census.

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    No. I believe that a question like that is unlikely to be answered truthfully or at all by all the people living in this country. A question like this…

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  • JonAnthony from South Dakota

    I believe that the answer to whether or not we should have the question ” Are you an American citizen?” on the U.S census because I feel that this would be easily able to target wear most of the non-American citizens live and trump has already been trying to keep our borders out of Mexico so now I wonder what would happen if he is to decide to come to these states and force illegal immigrants to try to go back to wherever they came from. Trump is not really qualified to make these decisions in my opinion because he does not know what these people have gone through in order to be safe with or without there families.

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    I believe that the answer to whether or not we should have the question ” Are you an American citizen?” on the U.S census because I feel that this wou…

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  • Bethany from South Dakota

    I don’t think it’s a good idea to have this question on the census. Immigrants or people who aren’t citizens might feel attacked or decide not to fill it out due to being scared of being kicked out. People who aren’t citizens might either not answer the question, not fill out their name (which can be pretty important to get factual information) or not fill out the census at all.

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    I don’t think it’s a good idea to have this question on the census. Immigrants or people who aren’t citizens might feel attacked or decide not to fill…

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  • Carah from North Carolina

    I have read many arguments regarding whether or not a citizenship question should be included on the US 2020 census. After reading, I take the stance of opposing the citizenship question. Other countries such as Canada and Australia support the idea of having their inhabitants answer this question on their census’, however, America is unique in the fact that people come here in hopes of a new life; the American Dream. America used to uphold the question of citizenship in the census’ up until the 1950s. In the 1950s, during and after WWII, there was a surge in immigration. Our levels of inhabitants increased, but a large portion of our country was not officially citizens. Asking if inhabitants are citizens may deter many from participating in the census, therefore, messing with the results of our data. Not only would the question (in the 1950s and now) affect the accurate data of our population, but it would affect the Electoral College. Swaying the results in favor of one (in this situation, specifically, the Republican) party. Currently, Trump is trying to include the question of citizenship to help gather information about the number of eligible voters in America as well as enforce the Voting Rights Act for minorities. While this purpose has good intentions, I believe that the effect on the Electoral College and collected data would outweigh the possible good side of adding the question to our census. The 14th amendment of the US constitution states “Every person born within the limits of the United States, and subject to their jurisdiction, is by virtue of natural law and national law a citizen of the United States. This will not, of course, include persons born in the United States who are foreigners, aliens, who belong to the families of ambassadors or foreign ministers accredited to the Government of the United States, but will include every other class of persons.” This means that just because a family lives here, does not particularly that they are citizens. If a family feels that they are going be questioned if they are an American citizen while they are in the process of becoming one, they may feel obligated to not participate in the census, hence, messing with the census’ data and original purpose. If the census cannot serve its original purpose in recording accurate data of the number of inhabitants in our country because of one question, I do not think that the question should be asked.

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    I have read many arguments regarding whether or not a citizenship question should be included on the US 2020 census. After reading, I take the stance …

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  • Kate from North Carolina

    I do not think that there should be a United States citizenship question on the 2020 census. According to The New York Times, “…critics who said the question was part of an administration effort to skew the census results in favor of Republicans.” This is possible because any non United States citizen who is either a noncitizen or minorities will not want to check off the boxes for which apply to them leading to a much decreased and inaccurate count of their population. Minorities and non-citizens are seen to generally vote for Democratic leaders and this citizenship test would give them less representation in the areas or states in which they live and decrease federal funding. The Justice Department also mentioned that in order to obtain and enforce the 1965 Voting Rights Act, which outlaws many discriminatory practices adopted during the Civil War, when the citizenship question would clearly be in violation of Act in that it discriminates against any non-citizens or minorities. This would be a political power move for the Republicans because in adding the citizenship question it would decrease any Democratic power or votes and increase any Republican votes. However, while the whole idea of the question seems to be a bad idea, the Census Bureau has stated that the answers “provide communities with important statistics to help ensure equal opportunity, educate children, and understand change.” While this in and of itself would be understandable and help the community, the Census Bureau and acknowledged that this question would decrease responses among the minorities and non-citizens which many believe that this is just a tactic the Republican leaders are using to gain more political control and power. While a citizenship question would be beneficial in regards to other departments such as education and equal opportunities, it does not belong on a United States census to greatly miscalculate the number of United States residents as well as the Representatives for each state.

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    I do not think that there should be a United States citizenship question on the 2020 census. According to The New York Times, “…critics who said t…

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  • Jessica from North Carolina

    I do not believe that future United States Censuses should contain a citizenship question because doing so encourages gerrymandering and could ultimately lead to skewed results by planting unnecessary fear into the minds of minority groups. The main purpose of the decennial U.S. Census is to determine the number of seats a state gets in the House of Representatives as well as the amount of federal spending needed for each state based on population. With these two factors on the line, it is essential that everyone participate to generate accurate results.

    Critics of the citizenship question claim that the Republican Party is attempting to use the question to their advantage by encouraging gerrymandering, which occurs when a political party manipulates a district’s boundaries to obtain an unfair voting advantage. Following the death of Republican strategist Thomas B. Hofeller, evidence of a 2015 report of him writing that “adding a citizenship question to the census would give Republicans a significant advantage in drawing new legislative district lines” was found, according to The New York Times. Not adding a question about citizenship in future U.S. census would be beneficial in avoiding attempts of unfair political shifts between parties.

    While advocates of the citizenship question argue that it would help with efforts to protect minority groups through the enforcement of the Voting Rights Act, there are claims that the question was aimed to discourage immigrants, especially undocumented ones, from participating in the Census. Nicholas Wu, a politics reporter, states that “immigrant advocacy organizations say the addition of the question might deter noncitizens from answering the Census, potentially creating an ‘undercount.’” According to the Pew Research Center, immigrants make up approximately 13.6% of the United States population as of 2017, making it the country with the largest amount of foreign-born individuals in the world. A lack of participation in the Census could ultimately lead to an unfair distribution of federal funds throughout the country as well as a state losing a position in the House of Representatives. In order to avoid a significant reduction in applicants, the federal government should not include the citizenship question, so that immigrants—documented or not—will continue to fill out their Census forms.

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    I do not believe that future United States Censuses should contain a citizenship question because doing so encourages gerrymandering and could ultimat…

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  • Carson from North Carolina

    I believe future US citizenship censuses shouldn’t contain a citizenship question because the census’s purpose is to simply keep count of the population and having a citizenship question would deter people from answering the census.
    According to article one, section two of the US constitution, the census is strictly for collecting data on the size of the population and to distribute representatives. If following the constitution, the only information that should be collected from the census is population numbers. Michigan State University describes the census by stating, “where thousands of people are hired to go around the country and count people.” Michigan State University just makes the point that the census is made to keep track of how many people are living in the US and not how many are illegal or legal.
    The goal of the census is to collect data on how large the population is, not to stray people away from taking the census. If the US were to implement citizenship questions, illegal immigrants would be scared to respond to the census. According to the US Census Bureau, “The addition of a citizenship question to the 2020 census could affect the self-response rate.” This is bad because to record accurate data, the US would need a majority of the population to respond, and the US needs accurate data to properly represent the people of the United States, which is very important for legislation. I believe that the idea of adding a citizenship question would alter representation and the idea of this addition to the census, was a partisan move to shift the balance of power between political parties in favor of one party over another party.
    To finalize my answer, I believe that the US citizenship census should refrain from including citizenship questions to protect the desired data and to keep the involvement of this census at the highest level.

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    I believe future US citizenship censuses shouldn’t contain a citizenship question because the census’s purpose is to simply keep count of the popu…

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  • Murphy from North Carolina

    The US census should not include a citizenship question, as the census’s sole purpose is to obtain the most accurate count of the population. The introduction of a citizenship question would discourage illegal immigrants from partaking in the census, lessening the accuracy of the report. According to researchers of the US Census Bureau, the citizenship question would result in a projected “44.5% problematic response rate” among noncitizens in the 2020 census. This means that a projected nearly half of the illegal immigrants would not be counted in the census, which would result in an over 1.7% drop in the total population response rate according to researchers of the US Census Bureau.

    The Trump Administration and the Department of Justice claim that the addition of this citizenship question would be used to better enforce the Voting Rights Act, which prohibits racial discrimination in voting through the drawing of intentional minority legislative districts. However, with the addition of this question, I fear that it will instead be used to endorse partisan politics. One of the purposes of the census is to determine how votes count, and an inaccurate representation in the number of illegal immigrants could optimize Congressional districts for the holding party power, currently Republican. This would ironically reduce the power of minority groups and increase party power.

    Along with this, the institutionalization of the American census has also been associated with ideas of democracy. This image would be threatened by this question, as it would serve to isolate these illegal immigrants from the rest of the population. I am not arguing against the deportation of illegal immigrants, but I do believe the government can obtain this information through alternate ways.

    Historically, a citizenship question has never been included on a census, and I believe the presence of one would just demonstrate the growing strength of partisan politics and destruction of democracy. For this reason, I believe the Supreme Court was correct in their ruling to exclude it from the 2020 census.

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    The US census should not include a citizenship question, as the census’s sole purpose is to obtain the most accurate count of the population. The in…

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  • Matthew from North Carolina

    I believe that the U.S. census should not have a question about citizenship. I think this because it boils down to a potential plot in order to sway a republican vote in the Trump administrations favor. The New York Times stated that approximately 6.5 million people would not have been counted in the census if the supreme court had passed the legislation for the addition of a question regarding U.S. citizenship to the Census. The New York Times also stated that states such as Arizona, California, Florida, Illinois, New York and Texas could have lost seats in the house as a result in the additional question being added. The loss in these seats could have changed the voting results in the 2020 election because these states all account heavily towards the electoral college votes. The winner of these states has primarily won the election in recent years, and the loss of these representatives in the swing states could hurt candidates in the upcoming years. I feel as if adding a question about citizenship would be a violation of personal rights because according to the USA Today article “By law, the Census Bureau is not allowed to share any personally identifying information from the census or share it with other federal agencies”. So according to this law, if the U.S. The Census Bureau was to share the information with another federal agency it would be violating federal law and not be eligible to be used in a court case. In conclusion, I believe that the U.S. Census Bureau should not be able to add an additional question about citizenship because it could potentially sway the House of Representatives votes in favor of one political party, and that it violates personal rights and laws if the information is shared with other federal agencies.

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    I believe that the U.S. census should not have a question about citizenship. I think this because it boils down to a potential plot in order to sway a…

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  • Phillip from North Carolina

    The U.S. Census should not require a citizenship question because not only does it have the potential to deter many immigrants from participating, but the Republican’s reasoning for implementing a citizenship question did not have much backing. Implementing a citizenship question could possibly deter many immigrants from participating in the census, which would defeat the whole purpose of the census. The census is just a count of population by state to determine votes in the Electoral College and seats in the House. If people do not participate, the count would be inaccurate and could provide states with the wrong number of both votes and seats (The New York Times). Even if the immigrants were undocumented or illegal, they are still residents of the state and if they live in the U.S. they should be counted in the census without fear of being deported. The census was not created to determine nationality or citizenship, but only the number of people living in each of the fifty states. Republicans like Trump, argue for the citizenship question because it is highly beneficial to the Republican party, as a vast number of minority votes would not be counted and tip the scales of House seats to the Republicans’ favor (CNN). The Supreme Court saw the holes in Trump’s argument for the citizenship question, and ruled for the absence of it due to the potential miscount it could cause. Whether it is an actual play for power in the House or not, the citizenship question should be kept out of the census question until immigrant groups and minorities feel safe in America. Republicans could not provide enough substantial evidence to persuade the supreme court to vote in their favor, which is why the question should be kept out. If the Republican Party cannot provide a strong enough argument for the question, then there is no basis for the question to be established in the Census, a questionnaire that should be pure from politics.

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    The U.S. Census should not require a citizenship question because not only does it have the potential to deter many immigrants from participating, but…

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  • Davis from North Carolina

    I believe that the U.S. Census, taken every ten years in order to count population and determine state representatives, should not have a question as to whether or not the person has U.S. citizenship. The U.S. Census is based off how many residents are in the United States of America at the time, regardless of citizenship, and it is irrelevant to the census, considering even if they are not a citizen they still account to the population. The Supreme Court ruled that there will not be a citizenship question accounted for on the Census coming later this year, and according to the New York Times, many believe the citizenship question could skew the results towards republicans, and that they want the census to have the most accurate information. The Trump administration was given the opportunity to provide an equal argument to those in opposition, but with the upcoming print deadline, the Trump administration dropped the case, and will no longer continue to plead. This was great news to those in opposition to the citizenship question, and it will not be dealt with for another decade, as printing for the 2020 U.S. Census was running out of time. The opposition also has a stronger argument as to why there should not be a citizenship question for many reasons including that it was a potential strategy of the republicans in order to sway votes towards them, and that it would eliminate about 6.5 million estimated Americans from the census. The government estimates that states such as Arizona, California, Texas, Illinois, New York, and Florida could lose representatives in the House in result of the citizenship question being added to the 2020 U.S. Census. In conclusion, I believe that the U.S. census should not have a question regarding citizenship, as it could be used as a potential plot for republican parties to come in the future, and that it could cause states to lose representatives that they already had in the House.

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    I believe that the U.S. Census, taken every ten years in order to count population and determine state representatives, should not have a question as …

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  • Ginger from North Carolina

    The United States should not ask the question of citizenship on any future censuses. President Trump recently brought forth the question to Congress: should future United States censuses ask a question of the applicant’s citizenship? Trump’s administration cited the reason behind this as being a way to more effectively enforce the Voting Rights act. According to USA today, President Trump argued that they “needed to have an accurate count of citizen voting-age populations in every congressional district.” This would be beneficial; however, implementing this policy would actually counteract the ultimate goal, which is to portray the statistics and data within the United States in a more accurate way. Enacting this policy would result in a turn off from many immigrants, whether legal or illegal, in fear that the government will not allow them to stay in the country or negatively affect them in any other possible way. Another drawback to making this particular addition to the United States census is that this could potentially skew the census results in favor of the Republicans in the country. This is because more Republicans would likely take part in completing the census, which would in turn have the effect of “shifting political power among the states and between the major political parties,” according to the New York Times. This would not create a fair portrayal and representation of all the members of our country. Article 1, Section 2 of the United States Constitution states the specific rules and regulations regarding how exactly the number of citizens in each state affects the makeup of Congress. This explains how important obtaining an accurate population count of United States citizens in each state actually is, and therefore why the United States should not make the addition of the citizenship question to United States censuses in the future.

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    The United States should not ask the question of citizenship on any future censuses. President Trump recently brought forth the question to Congress: …

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  • Aidan from Alabama

    I do not think that there should be a citizenship question on the national census. I think this because people lie. People lie too much. There is no way to tell if they would be telling the truth or not and it also might deter people from participating in the census in the first place. Although, I do think that it would be very beneficial to the government and our country knowing what percentage of our population are American citizens. In a Washington Post article they also stated, “But opponents said that including the question would deter many immigrants and their families, both legal and undocumented, from participating in the census…” I think that this is very true and it goes along with people lying or being dishonest. I also think that many people would not say that they are citizens for whatever reason and vice versa. Giving the public an option to choose to check a box is sadly just too much for them to handle. I think that the question would discredit the whole census and make it more inaccurate than ever before. In the same article by the Washington Post they state “The primary purpose is to determine, based on population, how many seats each state will have in the House of Representatives-…” this shows that the census has a large effect on our country. This gives even more people a reason to feel the need that they should mess it up and lie. To try and get more/less seats in the house of representatives for whatever reason. Personally, I think that the checkbox on the census is just giving the public more potential to be able to mess up our census because they may be upset with our president or how things are being run in our country.

    Washington post article: https://www.nytimes.com/2019/07/02/us/citizenship-question-census.html

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    I do not think that there should be a citizenship question on the national census. I think this because people lie. People lie too much. There is no w…

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  • Noah from North Carolina

    I believe a question pertaining to citizenship should not be included in future census as it discourages persons living within the U.S. from participating in the census. As the census is extremely important to determine exactly how many representatives each state needs, it would be frivolous to not get an accurate count of citizens. As cited by Ariane de Vogue and Kate Sullivan of CNN, President Trump stated that the census cost “Billions”, thus it would be a fruitless investment to include a citizenship question that will cause many people to question the integrity of the census and not participate in it. The Center for American Progress, a center that provides statistics on immigration, cited that there are over 22.6 million noncitizens living within the U.S., with around 11 million categorized as unauthorized migrants. Now, I’m not arguing that these undocumented migrants did the right thing in illegally living within the U.S., but I do believe the census should have an accurate count of all peoples living in the U.S. These undocumented migrants are already wary about a census as they know their status is illegal, but a having a question about someones citizenship status would quickly shoot down the portion of undocumented migrants that do actually fill out a census. These people already live with a fear that ICE will come knocking at their door, so these migrants believe that truthfully documenting their citizenship status for the government will absolutely send them back to the hardships that they came from. In conclusion, I believe the Supreme Court was justified in their decision to block a question pertaining to citizenship from the next U.S. census. This decision was justified as it will aid the census’s main purpose in getting an accurate count of all who live within the U.S. so that they may be represented on a federal level.

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    I believe a question pertaining to citizenship should not be included in future census as it discourages persons living within the U.S. from participa…

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  • Parker from North Carolina

    Asking the question “Are you a citizen of the United States?” should not be a part of the United States Census because it causes people who aren’t citizens to not participate in the census, there are other ways of finding out the percentage of people who are not citizens, and this will mess up the number to decide how many representatives each state gets in the House of Representatives.
    We need the census to get an accurate number so that we can tell how much our population is growing and how to represent each state in Electoral College and House of Reps, but that won’t happen if we ask if people are citizens. This will discourage people who might be illegal to not take the census, and that would skew the results and not accurately gain information on each state.
    There are also already other ways of finding out the percentage of US Citizens already in effect. According to Hansi Lo Wang from NPR, there are already programs in place that send forms to randomly chosen houses across America asking if they are a citizen or not. There are alternatives to using the census to find out who all are not citizens, and this would result in a more accurate number of the population.
    We should not ask if people are citizens in the census because that will mess up the number, and this has a big effect. This would cause for there to possibly be states underrepresented in the House of Representatives and the Electoral College. This means that certain states would get less say in the US government and who the future president would be.
    The census of 2020 should not ask if people are citizens because it will mess up the number it gives, there are already alternatives that work in effect, and this will cause for states to be underrepresented when it comes to House of Representatives and the Electoral College.

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    Asking the question “Are you a citizen of the United States?” should not be a part of the United States Census because it causes people who aren…

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  • McKyrah from North Carolina

    No, the U.S. census should not contain a citizenship question due to the fact many who live here illegally are more than likely not going to come forward about whether they are citizens or not. The main purpose of the census is to help enforce a part of the Voting Rights Act and that should continue to be the sole purpose. When asking questions, if someone is a citizen or not, it can lead to mistrust and panic from these who are illegally here. They now fear the risk of being deported, discriminated or sent to camps that are set up at the border. To NBC news Thomas Saenz, president and general counsel of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, stated how the test hasn’t been tested and how they just want to see the results whether they receive responses or not. With this information from Saenz, I believe that the whole questionnaire is just unnecessary and although they state that they cannot by law share the results you never know who to trust when filling out the surveys. According to CNN politics critics are now questioning whether asking this question could possibly result in minorities not being counted for their state. With these minorities not being counted, there could be further debates and complaints on whether or not they have much of a say in the way politics and laws are voted on in the country. This once again will be due to the wanting to ask about their citizenship making them feel intimidated by the possible consequences they could face from telling the truth. Even as Trump says how it would be a complete waste of billions of dollars without the question, maybe next time they could plan this whole process in a way that everyone feels safe to talk about being citizens or being undocumented immigrants in this country.

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    No, the U.S. census should not contain a citizenship question due to the fact many who live here illegally are more than likely not going to come forw…

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  • Abigail from Texas

    There is a substantial controversy with adding a citizenship question to our census, I believe that it is not obligatory for the Supreme Court to implement adding the question. The immigrants who are here illegally would discourse if they should answer the census or not due to the fact they might get deported by the U.S. immigration officials. The census would not be accurate as a result of many unofficial immigrants wouldn’t vote. The information would be inaccurate because immigrants might believe it could be used against them. . Personally, I believe that the citizenship question is intruding to one’s personal life.

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    There is a substantial controversy with adding a citizenship question to our census, I believe that it is not obligatory for the Supreme Court to impl…

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    • Adam from Colorado

      I agree with that, but if this was to remain anonymous, then we could get an accurate representation of population density and breadth, and we could see how many illegal immigrants there are in the US, and could seek proper responses, along with fighting miseducation of immigration numbers.

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      I agree with that, but if this was to remain anonymous, then we could get an accurate representation of population density and breadth, and we could s…

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  • Destinee from Texas

    The are you a citizen question on the census should not exist anymore because of the worry there is in a person who is not A legal United States citizen. People who support including a citizenship question have argued that it is important for legal purposes for the government to know the citizenship status of inhabitants of the country. As stated in New York Times “They dismissed the voting-rights argument, saying the government’s current estimate of the number of voting-age American citizens would be sufficient for that purpose. They said the citizenship question was actually a central element of a Republican strategy to try to shift political boundaries to the party’s advantage when the states begin using the new census to redraw their district maps in 2021.” The citizenship question is just to help benefit republicans strategy to shift the political boundary.

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    The are you a citizen question on the census should not exist anymore because of the worry there is in a person who is not A legal United States citiz…

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    • Jackson from North Carolina

      Do you not think that those districts should be determined by the number of eligible voters, since non-citezens are not eligible to vote then why should they be part of the determination of districts.

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      Do you not think that those districts should be determined by the number of eligible voters, since non-citezens are not eligible to vote then why shou…

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  • Adrian from Texas

    No, the census should not include a citizenship question because the main reason of the census is to know the current population of the country. Many Hispanics both documented or not will most likely not fill out the census which will make the census of the country skewed. Also one of the main reasons the supreme court declined this movement was because with more Hispanics and immigrants being scared to vote in the census there might be shifts in states towards the republican party.

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    No, the census should not include a citizenship question because the main reason of the census is to know the current population of the country. Many …

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  • Anaya from Texas

    No, they should not add citizenship questions to the census survey for 1 reason only. It’s a big waste of time, people could easily lie and say their citizens even if they aren’t. The government would never know if they are telling the truth or not unless they look up their name. If they decide to look up every “citizen” name who they suspect, that could take forever.

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    No, they should not add citizenship questions to the census survey for 1 reason only. It’s a big waste of time, people could easily lie and say their …

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  • Isabella from Texas

    No there should not be a requirement on whether or not to put your citizenship on the census. The U.S was founded on the basis of freedom and by taking away the question of whether or not you are a citizen takes away that fundamental right that separates us from other countries. The reason we as a country are so far ahead in the race of humanity is because we have the right of freedom and taking away the right. When the country was formed it the question was asked if it should be a right towards freedom not a choice that the person doesn’t even get a say in.

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    No there should not be a requirement on whether or not to put your citizenship on the census. The U.S was founded on the basis of freedom and by takin…

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  • Rosangelica from Texas

    Having a citizen question on the census will discourage the immigrant communities in the US, especially the ones that are undocumented. Under Trump’s administration,they have made sure that ICE they deport immigrants who are not documented and this will be easier for the government to find these people and send them away.

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    Having a citizen question on the census will discourage the immigrant communities in the US, especially the ones that are undocumented. Under Trump’s …

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  • Hunter from Texas

    I don’t accept that the evaluation ought to incorporate an inquiry concerning citizenship. I accept that the statistics ought to be exclusively founded on who lives in the U.S, not who live here wrongfully .

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    I don’t accept that the evaluation ought to incorporate an inquiry concerning citizenship. I accept that the statistics ought to be exclusively founde…

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  • Lillian from Mississippi

    They should not have a citizenship question because we don’t know the reason they left their home country.

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  • Noelle from North Carolina

    I believe that the U.S. census should not contain a citizenship question. As stated in Article 1, Section 2 of the United States Constitution, the United States government is required to count the entire population of a country, and at the location where each person, both citizen and non-citizen, lives every ten years. I strongly believe that implementing a question that asks the citizenship status of the person will deter many immigrants and racial minorities from completing the census form as they might fear that the information disclosed could be used against them for immigration enforcement. Some may argue that the Census Bureau is not allowed to release or share the information gained from the questionnaires but according to the Washington Post, Margo J. Anderson of the University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee and statistician William Seltzer of Fordham University, “census officials shared data from the 1940 census to target Japanese Americans during the federal government’s internment of Japanese Americans during World War II.” This blatant disregard of the law has happened in the past, and there is no way to ensure that history will not repeat itself. This fear could lead to an inaccurate census information result and thus skew the delegation of House of Representatives seats to the states. Although many critics will assert that implementing the citizenship question will further allow for the government to obtain more in-depth demographic research, the information gathered will ,in fact, be less accurate as it will not account for many immigrants and racial minorities. I believe the census should continue to do its sole job of determining the population and in the words of New York Attorney General Letitia James “ remain a tool for delivering on our government’s promise of fairness and equity”. Justice Stephen Breyer wrote that if the government decides to implement a citizenship question it “risked undermining public confidence in the integrity of our democratic system itself.”

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    I believe that the U.S. census should not contain a citizenship question. As stated in Article 1, Section 2 of the United States Constitution, the Uni…

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  • Jackson from North Carolina

    I do not think the United States should include a citizenship question in the next census. As stated in Article 2 of the U.S. Constitution, the census is used to fairly distribute the amount of representatives each state receives in the House of Representatives accordingly every ten years. This distribution can be easily achieved without asking the unnecessary question of whether or not someone is a legal citizen of the United States, because even though not all immigrants may have rightful citizenship, they still contribute to our democracy every day and deserve to be represented in governmental decisions that would directly affect them. Also, if the citizenship question is asked, then that could extremely affect many immigrant lives due to the animosity that is currently held towards them in Trump’s ongoing administration. If the federal government hypothetically obtained more information about its citizens through this question, it would allow them to have more control where it may not be needed, which could possibly lead to more immigrant deportations because of the fact that ICE raids have been occurring increasingly more over the past 2 years or so.
    Another reason as to why a citizenship question should not be included in the next United States census is to not potentially discourage immigrants from filling out the census, because if some feel that the government is trying to exploit them in any way, then they may not fill it out for protective reasons. This would not be good for the government, because any information they can gather on its citizens can help them with getting as much of an accurate read on the national population as possible, and ultimately, distributing the House of Representatives as fairly as they can in the coming years. Lastly, a citizenship question could also lead to United States immigrants’ citizenship statuses being used against them, which some may argue is not the government’s intentions, because historically, immigrant statuses would be used to help protect minority rights through the Voting Rights Act, but the current feelings towards immigrants in the federal government should not indicate those same objectives.

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    I do not think the United States should include a citizenship question in the next census. As stated in Article 2 of the U.S. Constitution, the census…

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  • Alexis from Ohio

    No. The purpose of the census is to determine how many people live in the country—whether they are here legally or not—and including a citizenship question would discourage both documented and undocumented immigrants from filling out the census.
    If immigrants are being discouraged from filling out the census, then they will not be adequately represented in the United States House of Representatives and may receive less federal funding then they should.

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    No. The purpose of the census is to determine how many people live in the country—whether they are here legally or not—and including a citizenship…

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  • Sumer from Virginia

    Future censuses should not contain a citizenship question. It is important that the government keeps the census strictly about population and not citizenship to ensure that all inhabitants are fairly represented in politics. The purpose of the census is to determine how many people are living in the country. If there is a question regarding citizenship, then illegal immigrants may choose to avoid filing a census, thus, giving the U.S. an inaccurate calculation of our countries population as well as an inaccurate measure of the minority population.
    While it is important that all inhabitants be documented, the census is not the appropriate way to gather that information. Instead of asking that question on a census, perhaps the government could have some other organization gather that information.

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    Future censuses should not contain a citizenship question. It is important that the government keeps the census strictly about population and not citi…

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  • gabriele from Kentucky

    There should not be a question on the census asking if you are a citizen or not. It is a double Jepordy question for all of those that the question is pointed at. If you lie that is a big offense to the federal government and if you say that you are not a citizen then your information is out there and it could be used against you. So why bother if most or all are just going to put yes.

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    There should not be a question on the census asking if you are a citizen or not. It is a double Jepordy question for all of those that the question i…

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  • Jacob from Kentucky

    I do not believe a citizenship question should be required on the census. A citizenship question, as ruled by the supreme court, would have negative effects ion the census process. People who are not citizens would not say that they are not citizens and might provide inaccurate info on the census. Additionally, if those in communities with undocumented immigrants, might be discouraged to fill out the census to avoid incriminating friends or family. This all would lead to an inaccurate count of the American populace and create an unequal distribution of representatives. Additionally, the federal and state government utilizes the census data for numerous agencies and purposes, which would result in an unequal distribution of that assistance if the citizenship question remained on the census.

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    I do not believe a citizenship question should be required on the census. A citizenship question, as ruled by the supreme court, would have negative e…

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  • Sophia from Kentucky

    I think the idea behind the citizen question is good because it is supposed to measure the accuracy of legal American citizens. However, it would actually not be accurate at all. People who are living here illegally are not going to mark down “no” on a citizenship question, because that just gives ICE direct information about where they live and puts them at risk for deportation. In fact, people will probably lie about citizenship in order to protect their families. Either way, the census is meant to measure the number of people living in the United States, and whether we like it or not, many people do live here as undocumented immigrants and participate in life here in America. A citizenship question isn’t going to change the number of people who answer the census, and it probably won’t majorly affect the census numbers either.

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    I think the idea behind the citizen question is good because it is supposed to measure the accuracy of legal American citizens. However, it would actu…

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  • Drew from Kentucky

    They shouldn’t ask that particular question because people are going to lie about it on the census. It also goes against the Fifth Amendment “self-incrimination” clause. If they are here illegally they should not have to answer that question because they would be incriminating themself. The United States Government has a responsibility and duty to uphold the Constitution and all of the rights guaranteed to its citizens. These rights should not be violated under any circumstance which is why the question should not be on the census in 2020.

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    They shouldn’t ask that particular question because people are going to lie about it on the census. It also goes against the Fifth Amendment “self-inc…

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  • Aaron from Kentucky

    While putting a citizenship question on the US Census would allow the federal government to better understand what percentage of our population of the population are actual citizens which could have a variety of benefits, there is no practical reason for putting this question on a census. Those people living in the United States who are not US citizens could easily lie about their citizenship which would distort the results. If adding the question is not going to yield accurate results, that can be used beneficially, there is no reason to put a question about citizenship on a census.

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    While putting a citizenship question on the US Census would allow the federal government to better understand what percentage of our population of the…

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  • Drew from Kentucky

    I believe that there should not be a citizenship question on the U.S. census. If there was people that are in the U.S. illegally would have no incentive to be truthful in answering that question which would therefore throw out any benefits to having that question. It can also be argued that this question is a privacy issue and people are protected from answering it under the 5th amendment.

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    I believe that there should not be a citizenship question on the U.S. census. If there was people that are in the U.S. illegally would have no incenti…

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  • Anthony from Colorado

    No, the purpose of the census is to know how many people live in the country, not how many people live here legally.

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  • Coby from Indiana

    Not only will undocumented immigrants be hesistant to respond to the census, but there are other alternatives to calculating the population of undocumented immigrants. Using mexican census data between 1990 and 2010, one can gauge the size of Mexico’s “missing” population, most of whom came to the U.S and using other data like how many came legally, one can figure out an estimate. With this data, we find that there are10-13 million undocumented immigrants. Using better equations, one can estimate 11 million and we came up with this number without putting 11 million people in an uncorfortable situation where they believe they are putting their livelihoods and possibly their families at risk for deportation

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    Not only will undocumented immigrants be hesistant to respond to the census, but there are other alternatives to calculating the population of undocum…

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  • Simon from Indiana

    No, the US should include the whether or not a person is on the census because those who are here illegally will not obviously tell the truth. We do not live in a world where people always tell the truth not only that, but it becomes more of a tool inorder to intentionally find illegal immigrants instead of reliable documentation. What about margins that are not currently legal right now, but are going through the system to become one if they say they are not a legal immigrant would that mean they would be deported on the spot or allowed to stay where they are at the moment because they are going through the process of it. I put far more pressure on immigrants since it would be unclear how they would be treated.

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    No, the US should include the whether or not a person is on the census because those who are here illegally will not obviously tell the truth. We do n…

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  • Kyle from Kentucky

    The U.S census is a survey that is critical in determining that each state gets the right number of representatives in government and allocating federal funding based on population. I believe that the census should not contain a citizenship question because it would scare people away from taking the survey and therefore would give an incorrect representation of the population. This would negate the reasoning behind having the U.S census in the first place. Furthermore, if there were a citizenship question it is likely that those not wanting to disclose their status would lie. While it is important to know the status of the people in the country, it is more important to know the number of people in the country. It would be better for another organization or method to focus on the status of inhabitants in the country rather than utilizing the census for that information in order to ensure a more accurate representation of the population.

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    The U.S census is a survey that is critical in determining that each state gets the right number of representatives in government and allocating feder…

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  • Maddie from Kentucky

    I do not think that the United States Census should add a question regarding legal citizenship or not. This is because regardless the legal status of an immigrant, individuals can easily get around the question by lying about it. Also, this question might envoke fear which causes less people to participate in the Census. Although I do agree that this question would allow for greater boarder security and a higher rate of deportation, this would result in a incorrect count of citizens and funding would be significantly skewed.

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    I do not think that the United States Census should add a question regarding legal citizenship or not. This is because regardless the legal status of …

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  • Sydney from Kentucky

    I think that the U.S Census should not contain a citizenship question because I believe there could be a chance that some people could lie about whether they are a citizen or not. Besides, the main point of the census is to find out how many representatives each state gets, it has nothing to do with the citizenship and I believe that there could be possible repercussions if people say that they aren’t a citizen. There could be a possibility that the government uses this information against these people who aren’t citizens.

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    I think that the U.S Census should not contain a citizenship question because I believe there could be a chance that some people could lie about wheth…

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  • Erika from Texas

    I believe that the U.S. censuses should not contain a citizenship question. The reason for an enumeration is to truly include the number of occupants in a nation — not enlisted residents. I believe that if a citizenship question is included in the census then a lot of people will not answer the census and it will be less accurate. The Census is less reliable. It can affect the accuracy of the statistics for those 10 years and also affect the House of Representatives. A CNN article called ‘Supreme Court blocks 2020 census citizenship question in setback for Trump admin’ stated that “The bitter controversy centers around whether the administration can ask all recipients a citizenship question on the 2020 census for the first time since 1950 — a move that could impact the balance of power in states and the House of Representatives, which are based on total population. Adding the question, critics say, could result in minorities being undercounted.” This article explains that the minority, who may not be a citizen of the United States, will prefer to not answer the census. This would cause the power of the House of Representatives to be unbalanced. We need our census to be accurate as it gives us the statistics for the 10 years. It is important that everyone answers the census, so there should not be a citizenship question. While others may argue that it provides more information and shows and compares answers of citizens and non-citizens, people who are not citizens will most likely not answer the census, so it would provide less accurate information. Therefore, the U.S. censuses should not contain a citizenship question, as it could lead to less accurate information and affects the balance of power in the House of Representatives.

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    I believe that the U.S. censuses should not contain a citizenship question. The reason for an enumeration is to truly include the number of occupants …

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  • Chase from Texas

    I disagree because the question entails that you must be a citizen to be in the majority. Since residents on green cards and visas are not technically citizens, it will not work to single out illegal immigrants because the question will not be answered in truth. Although most citizens will answer it, the majority of illegals will not, unless there is some kind of system implemented that requires proof of citizenship.

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    I disagree because the question entails that you must be a citizen to be in the majority. Since residents on green cards and visas are not technicall…

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    • Tanner from Colorado

      I agree with you on how almost all illegal immigrants will not tell the truth and I think personally that it would be a huge waste of time and money to be put together and managed.

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  • Kelly from Kentucky

    A citizenship question should not be asked because the entire basis of the census is just to gather data for the purpose of gaining population purposes. If the people feel they cannot disclose information to the census because they worry about deportation, then the census results will not be accurate and thus not truly represent the number of citizens the United States actually has. It is important that every person fill the census out so keeping the question of citizenship out of it will keep the census accurate and of importance.

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    A citizenship question should not be asked because the entire basis of the census is just to gather data for the purpose of gaining population purpose…

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  • Elhadj from Kentucky

    No i don’t think so because the purpose of them being at your house is to ask the number of people that live there. Even if they asked the question illegal immigrants would not answer the question truthfully.

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    No i don’t think so because the purpose of them being at your house is to ask the number of people that live there. Even if they asked the question il…

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  • Jesus from Texas

    I think a question is a bad idea,for 2 reasons first census is just to count the population and should not require to answer a question.Why you may be asking well immigrants would not want to come to the US because they are discouraged to do so because the question they might feel the government is testing them. My final reason is that it takes time away from people this concept is a waste of time and extra.In conclusion as people say work smarter not harder this is an example of that if the government wants feedback make a website to vote like this website think the vote.

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    I think a question is a bad idea,for 2 reasons first census is just to count the population and should not require to answer a question.Why you may b…

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  • Alyssa from Colorado

    I do not think that we should include a citizenship question because this will affect the amount of people who participate and the census is more focused on how many people reside in the United States and not on someone’s background. Unauthorized immigrants might be afraid to tell the truth because they are afraid of what may happen.

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    I do not think that we should include a citizenship question because this will affect the amount of people who participate and the census is more focu…

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  • Allison from Kentucky

    No, the US census should not have a question about citizenship, because the simple resinoning of that the question would not be answered honestly. If an illegal immigrant were asked this, the likelihood is they wouldn’t answer honestly. The census is a survey of the number of people living in a particular area not their citizenship.

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    No, the US census should not have a question about citizenship, because the simple resinoning of that the question would not be answered honestly. If …

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  • jp from Kentucky

    I think no it is not a good idea. It wood just make people not want to fill out the census and that wood under funded organizations who help illegal immigrants and Healthcare.

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  • Katie from Kentucky

    I do not think that there should be a citizenship question on the census because the whole purpose of the census is to get a total population. If there is a citizenship question most illegal immigrants will not fill the census out in fear of deportation, skewing the results. It is important to get the most accurate number possible to split the house seats up accurately and fairly. The entire purpose of the census is to know how many people live in the country, not how many people live here legally. Overall, a citizenship question would create skewed results and dismiss the entire purpose of the census.

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    I do not think that there should be a citizenship question on the census because the whole purpose of the census is to get a total population. If ther…

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  • Kylee from Kentucky

    No, the census does not need a citizenship question because it should be based upon the total population. The census is based on the total population to determine representatives in the House. Whether they are citizens or not, the state represents those citizens because they are included in the population. Therefore, because the census determines representatives, all people in a particular area should be included to be completely accurate.

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    No, the census does not need a citizenship question because it should be based upon the total population. The census is based on the total population …

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  • Phoebe from Kentucky

    No, I believe that citizenship should not be counted as the purpose for the census is to count the entire population. The census allows the government to see how many people live in a home and to see their living conditions. Furthermore, every ten years the population changes and the census determines the population density. There are still immigrants in the US and they determine the population as well as citizens. The census has to do with who is in the United States not who are citizens.

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    No, I believe that citizenship should not be counted as the purpose for the census is to count the entire population. The census allows the government…

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  • Victor from Texas

    I would agree that they shouldn’t put the question in the Census because they are looking for population and I wouldn’t see why putting citizenship in a census is necessary as its not relevant to counting population.

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    I would agree that they shouldn’t put the question in the Census because they are looking for population and I wouldn’t see why putting citizenship in…

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  • Hannah from Kentucky

    The 2020 US Census should not include a citizenship question. Such a question would foster inequality among all Americans, not just non-citizens. As a nation we have a responsibility to ensure that everyone’s voice is heard. When this doesn’t happen we all suffer.
    There are several problems with adding a citizenship question.

    First off, adding a citizenship question would lead to an undercount. This would cause a decrease in government aid to some areas, because the government doesn’t know the actual population.

    Secondly, it would open the door to dangerous garrymandering that would give racial majorities in some locations an undue amount of power.

    While I understand the rational of those who support a citizenship question on the census. I believe that silencing minorities hurts everyone.

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    The 2020 US Census should not include a citizenship question. Such a question would foster inequality among all Americans, not just non-citizens. As a…

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  • Anna from Colorado

    I voted no, because it’s counting how many people are in the country- not how many people are citizens. If the illegal immigrant says “no” they are now labeled as an illegal immigrant and will most likely get deported. The purpose of this is to get an accurate count of how many people are living in the country, not to expose illegal immigrants. If they left out the question, the country would be able to get an accurate count of how many people are truly living in the country.

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    I voted no, because it’s counting how many people are in the country- not how many people are citizens. If the illegal immigrant says “no” they …

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  • Kyle from Indiana

    To many people just looking at the question on a surface level, the question might not seem like a big deal. Why shouldn’t a country know how many citizens reside in their borders? However it is important to understand both historical background and possible consequences of the addition of this question to the census. First of all the, census is done every ten years to determine the allocation of congressional and electors to the states. The revised form of Article 1 Section 2 Clause 3 states, “Representatives shall be apportioned among the several States according to their respective numbers, counting the whole number of persons in each State, excluding Indians not taxed.” The whole number of persons in each state include citizens and noncitizens. This goes to the core of the mission of the census, To get an accurate measurement of those living within the United States. Adding a citizenship question will without a doubt lead to a error in measurement of the total persons in a state. Some states benefit through gaining a seat or two while some states lose influence. In that nature, the census will always face fierce attempts to politicise it and benefit a certain side. Mounting evidence shows that Thomas Hofeller, the architect of the citizenship question, proposed the question to benefit the white rural communities as this question would lead to an underestimate of more diverse urban communities. by that nature, there is discrimination based on race which is unconstitutional based on the 14th amendment. The question at hand is not whether a country has a right to know how many citizens and noncitizens reside in its borders. The true question is whether the census can Constitutionally contain this question. Based on historical analysis, political and racial origination of the question, and negative effects, it is clear that the census should not be the platform for this question.

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    To many people just looking at the question on a surface level, the question might not seem like a big deal. Why shouldn’t a country know how many cit…

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  • Kise from Missouri

    They shouldn’t include a question like that for the following reasons:
    > Immigrants without citizenship won’t answer the question or might straight up refuse to fill out the form
    > The form is to know who resides in the United States, not who are citizens
    > It puts immigrants at risk, even those with green cards

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    They shouldn’t include a question like that for the following reasons:
    > Immigrants without citizenship won’t answer the question or might straigh…

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    • Allie from Colorado

      I agree, because a census is used to get a measurement of the general people living in each single state. it doesn’t mention singling out immigrants.

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    • Elizabeth from Colorado

      “The form is to know who resides in the United States, not who are citizens.”
      If you exclude illegal immigrants from the census, you are removing a large group of people who reside in the United States. If you don’t add the question, you miss important information on the population of the country.

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      “The form is to know who resides in the United States, not who are citizens.”
      If you exclude illegal immigrants from the census, you are removing a l…

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  • Rachel from New Hampshire

    It is a count of people, not citizens, so there shouldn’t be a question about citizenship.

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    • Anna from Pennsylvania

      I would oppose the citizenship question if people arguing for this side were consistent in their expectations. If it is true that the census is a count of all the people in the country — nothing more and nothing less — then the census ought not to ask questions regarding race and whether the home is owned or rented. However, if it is argued that the government has a compelling interest in gathering data about race and economics, especially if such data is needed to enforce certain laws, then one must be open to gathering citizenship data for the same purpose.

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      I would oppose the citizenship question if people arguing for this side were consistent in their expectations. If it is true that the census is a cou…

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    • Cade from Colorado

      I agree they are counting people and not asking a citizenship question(s). It could waste time too and make the whole process slower

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    • Anna from Colorado

      I totally agree. The illegal immigrants should be allowed to say they live in this country. Overall, it would benefit everyone so America could get a head count on everyone living in the country to make adjustments. There is a time and place for deportations, and I believe this isn’t the correct time. If they want an accurate number, they must leave the question out.

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      I totally agree. The illegal immigrants should be allowed to say they live in this country. Overall, it would benefit everyone so America could get a …

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  • Jack from Pennsylvania

    The point of the census is to get an accurate measure of people living in each state, not to expose illegal immigrants. By imposing a citizenship question, the results will be less accurate and thus possibly not giving each state the resources and votes it is granted by the Constitution.

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    The point of the census is to get an accurate measure of people living in each state, not to expose illegal immigrants. By imposing a citizenship ques…

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    • Elizabeth from Colorado

      The purpose of a census is to get numbers on how many people are in a state for a few reasons, one of them being how many seats a state gets in the House of Representatives. A state should not have more impact on the federal government because it has a high proportion of people who are unable to vote and participate in elections.

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      The purpose of a census is to get numbers on how many people are in a state for a few reasons, one of them being how many seats a state gets in the Ho…

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  • Naomi from Virginia

    The purpose of a census is to physically count the number of inhabitants in a country — not registered citizens. Any immigrant who sees the question “Are you a citizen?” on the form will automatically shut down and refuse to fill it out. It is effectively a catch-22. If they tell the truth and respond “No” they are now labeled as an “illegal immigrant” and could be forcibly removed from the country. So the only option then would be to simply not respond, leaving a gap in the census. America’s information regarding number of inhabitants would be drastically skewed considering how many immigrants we have living within our borders, and towns and states would not get the correct amount of aide or government money as they would have otherwise. Leave out the question of citizenship, and even those who are not registered will feel secure enough to fill out the form and report their existence.

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    The purpose of a census is to physically count the number of inhabitants in a country — not registered citizens. Any immigrant who sees the question …

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