Are Voting Rights Sufficiently Protected in the United States?

Debates are perennial in the United States over how to balance election integrity while still ensuring citizens can easily vote. This has been an especially hot topic since the 2020 presidential election, after which many states passed new election and voting laws. In the past week, the Senate voted on a new bill which supporters argued would increase protections of voting rights, again sparking debates on the matter.

Those who argue that voting rights are sufficiently protected in the United States argue that there are currently no unconstitutional barriers to voting. They may argue that current proposals such as mail-in-ballots and election day holidays simply make it easier to vote—they wouldn’t remove illegal barriers to voting. Additionally, they contend that measures such as preventing former convicts from voting are designed to keep people from making policy decisions for the rest of the country.

Those who argue that voting rights are not sufficiently protected in the United States argue that the current laws in some states are forms of voter suppression. They argue that putting limits on mail-in-ballots and not giving workers the day off are designed to limit the ability of people to vote and therefore are unconstitutional. Additionally, they may argue that measures that prevent voting are designed to keep certain demographics from having any political power.

So, what do you think? Are Voting Rights Sufficiently Protected in the United States? Students may answer Yes, they are; No, they are not; or a nuanced answer in between!

Note: Ideal Think the Vote responses include the following:

-Address the question asked in a thoughtful and meaningful manner

-Use cited facts and constitutional arguments when appropriate to support their answers

-Are expressed in cohesive sentences and are free of distracting spelling, punctuation, and grammatical errors

-They address counter-arguments and opposing concerns in a respectful manner

-They organize their answer in a manner that flows logically and reads clearly

Current Standings:
Yes: 58%
No: 42%
  • Grant from Illinois

    I believe that voting rights are well protected in the United States. There are a multitude of ways to vote, there is mail in voting, in person voting, and absentee voting. So when it is said that not all people have the ability to vote, that simply isn’t true. There are many avenues to vote. Moreover, many are given election day off, so it is even easier to vote. Some argue that voter IDs or ballot requirements such as proving that you live at the location you say you do cause voter suppression and hinder voter rights. But that cannot be further from the truth, just like having to do anything, you need an ID. Especially when it comes to electing the leaders of our country, I think it is reasonable to require an ID. Almost every adult has an ID, and I think it is an invalid argument that requiring IDs to vote hinders voter rights. In the constitution, the right to vote is protected by the 15th and 19th amendment, saying that all skin colors, races, gender, and any citizen with the US (with some exceptions for criminals). There could be no better protector of rights than the constitution, which is the foundation of the United States. It is the main duty of the government to carry out the constitution, so by saying voting rights aren’t being protected, it is saying that the government is carrying out its main role, which simply isn’t true. Another popular argument is that criminals are not allowed to vote, so their right to vote isn’t protected. While I can see the basis for this argument, I think it is extremely unsafe having murders or drug dealers decide who runs the country. These people were convicted through due process by a jury of their peers, so these people have had a fair trial and [part of their punishment is not being able to vote. Overall, voting rights are fair and protected by the constitution, and it is on the citizens themselves to get out and vote. The government makes it easy to vote through many different ways and even some states make election day holiday. Voting is super important because it gives everyone a chance to have a say in the government, which is why the citizens of the United States are so lucky that their government makes it so easy to vote, and protects their ability to vote no matter the color of their skin, their ethnicity, or their gender, a unique thing in the world.

    [read less]

    I believe that voting rights are well protected in the United States. There are a multitude of ways to vote, there is mail in voting, in person voting…

    [read more]
    0
  • Grace from Illinois

    I believe voter rights are sufficiently protected in the United States of America. It’s very easy to vote, especially now that we have mail in ballots. There are lots of voting stations around the country, proving it’s not hard to get to one. To add on, some people get Election Day off, which is extremely fair and gives you the whole day to vote. Some may say that workers don’t get the day off so they don’t have time to vote. Although it is true that they are working, nobody works from 6am to 12am every day. Everyone can find time, and if you are in that position, it’s likely your boss needs to vote too, so it would be understandable to take some time away. Also, some may say it’s unconstitutional for people who committed crime to be unable to vote. First of all, why would you ever want a criminal deciding who runs our country. I don’t think they have the right to do that after they have caused harm in our country. Adding on, I don’t see how anybody has an excuse that they don’t have time now that there is such a window of time to vote and you don’t even have to leave your house. Overall, voting rights are fair and constitutional, it’s on you to figure out your schedule and find a time ahead of time to do so. Voting is extremely important and I believe everyone should participate, and the government does too, which is why they made voting rights extremely constitutional and fair.

    [read less]

    I believe voter rights are sufficiently protected in the United States of America. It’s very easy to vote, especially now that we have mail in ballots…

    [read more]
    0
  • Cecelia from North Carolina

    Voting rights are one thing our democratic society is constantly trying to improve in the United States. A reason why these voting rights are important is because “The right to vote protects all our other freedoms” (Aftergut). Although the government tries to do more to protect the voting rights of citizens in America, these rights are already protected in the United States.
    An example of voting rights being protected is by the many laws that are given to people with disabilities. Within the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the Help America Vote Act (HAVA), voters are given polling places that can accommodate those with impairments. Things like wheelchair accessible voting booths and voting equipment for the blind or visually impaired are required for those in need. Without these requirements given to the disabled, many people would not be able to cast their ballot. Voters with disabilities are also given the choice to vote in private and can bring someone to help them vote. These acts protect the disableds voting rights. These laws give them the resources they need to be able to exercise their right as citizens to participate in the democracy we have in the United States.
    Voting rights are also heavily protected in the United States historically and modernly by the legislation that has been passed to ensure that everyone has an equal opportunity to vote.
    One of the most famous examples of protecting voting rights for Americans was the Voting Rights Act of 1965, this act helped to “overcome legal barriers at the state and local levels that prevented African Americans from exercising their right to vote as guaranteed under the 15th Amendment to the U.S.” This was a huge change for society in the United States, this law prohibited things like literacy tests and poll taxes used to discriminate against black voters. In the past, the government and activists have made so much progress in establishing voting rights for everyone. Even in modern times voting rights are still being reformed to offer more protection for citizens. This is shown by a bill proposed on Sep. 14, 2021 by Senator Joe Manchin and his colleagues known as the Freedom to Vote Act. This act ensures voting rights to citizens who have been imprisoned, prohibits interference with citizens’ access to polls, and makes absentee voting an option for everyone along with multiple other benefits (Aftergut). The act itself is just one instance of how protection of voting rights are still a priority today.

    Citations:
    Aftergut , Dennis. “Congress Has a Massive Voting Rights Bill in Its Grasp. It Must Pass It, Now | Dennis Aftergut.” The Guardian, Guardian News and Media, 22 Sept. 2021, https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2021/sep/22/congress-must-pass-voting-rights-bill.
    “Voting and Election Laws.” USAGov, 4 Oct. 2021, https://www.usa.gov/voting-laws.
    History.com Editors. “Voting Rights Act of 1965.” History.com, A&E Television Networks, 9 Nov. 2009, https://www.history.com/topics/black-history/voting-rights-act.

    [read less]

    Voting rights are one thing our democratic society is constantly trying to improve in the United States. A reason why these voting rights are importan…

    [read more]
    0
  • Amelia from North Carolina

    Voting is a characteristic of democracy that defines the American government. Since the birth of our independent nation, voting has served the purpose of allowing the people to have a voice in selecting the officials who lead our country. Since then, different policies and processes have been created to ensure the rights of those eligible to vote are protected. Voting rights are sufficiently protected in the United States due to the process of mail in ballots and security invoked from policies established in the voting system.
    The process of requiring voter identification has contributed to protecting voting rights in America. Voter identification laws help prevent voter fraud by limiting cases of impersonation, fake voter registrations, and double-voting. Hans von Spakovsky from the Heritage Foundation addresses that “Every individual who is eligible to vote should have the opportunity to do so. It is equally important, however, that the votes of eligible voters are not stolen or diluted by a fraudulent or bogus vote cast by an ineligible or imaginary voter. “ Some might argue that the requirement of voter identification has decreased voter turnout amongst minority groups, however this claim has been proven false by recent studies which show it has no effect on turnout from this population. Spakovsky shares that “In September 2007, The Heritage Foundation released a study analyzing the 2004 election turnout data for all states. This study found that voter ID laws do not reduce the turnout of voters, including African–Americans and Hispanics. Such voters were just as likely to vote in states with ID as in states where just their names were asked at the polling place.” Further studies have followed these statistics and drawn the same conclusion that no correlation can be found with requiring voter identification and the decrease in voter turnout amongst minority groups. Therefore, requiring voter identification is a reasonable policy that guarantees the protection of voters during the process of an election.
    The development of the concept of mail-in ballots has added to the protection of voters. Postal voting is voting in an election where ballot papers are distributed to electors (and typically returned) by post, in contrast to electors voting in-person at the election polls. Mail-in ballots have existed in previous election years, however have been most useful during the 2020 presidential election conducted during the COVID-19 pandemic. This has allowed for voters to social distance, while still giving them an opportunity to have a voice in electing government officials. An examination conducted by Stanford political scientists Adam Bonica and Hakeem Jefferson concluded that “Mail-in voting also had positive effects among blue-collar workers, voters without a high school diploma, voters with less wealth and voters of color, Bonica and Jefferson reported in the paper.” They added that “These findings suggest that making it easier to vote increases electoral participation among those who may otherwise remain unengaged.” Not only does mail-in voting contribute to protecting voting rights, it has also increased voter turnout by making it easier for those who are unwilling to vote otherwise.
    Voting has existed since the very beginning of our nation’s existence. It has made a substantial contribution to the prosperity of the American government. It has been established from the beginning that it is the right of the people to elect their representatives in government to create and carry out laws of our nation. As the process of voting has changed throughout the years, policy has been made to continue to ensure the success of our government through election. Through the use of voter identification and mail-in ballots, we have continued to increase voter participation and protect the people’s right to vote because our nation’s success depends on it.

    Citations:

    Spakovsky, Hans von. “Voter Photo Identification: Protecting the Security of Elections.” The Heritage Foundation, 13 July 2011, https://www.heritage.org/report/voter-photo-identification-protecting-the-security-elections.

    Witte, Melissa De. “Examining Effects, Challenges of Mail-in Voting.” Stanford News, 23 Sept. 2020, https://news.stanford.edu/2020/09/03/examining-effects-challenges-mail-in-voting/.

    [read less]

    Voting is a characteristic of democracy that defines the American government. Since the birth of our independent nation, voting has served the purpose…

    [read more]
    0
  • Emily from North Carolina

    The United States of America’s voting rights are protected because of the amount of bills and laws that are currently in the making inorder to ensure our voting rights are more secure and fair for everyone and the safety of our citizens. This includes allowing citizens to request mail-in ballots and make Election Day a holiday so every citizen that is eligible to vote is able to do so. Due to the pandemic, mail-in ballots are safer for the citizens of the United States because to lessen the spread of COVID-19, then the citizens need to lower the spread of infection.

    Recently, there has been some conflict about the passing of this new law called “The Freedom to Vote Act”. According to BrennanCenter, “On September 14, a group of Democratic senators led by Sens. Amy Klobuchar (D-MN) and Joe Manchin (D-WV) introduced the Freedom to Vote Act, a package of reforms that would be the most consequential voting rights and anti-corruption bill passed in more than half a century. The bill addresses the biggest problems facing our democracy, from efforts to restrict access to the ballot, to campaign finance laws, to voter roll purges, to extreme partisan gerrymandering.” This statement explains how this act will hone down on the consequential voting rights and corrupted bills that have been passed rencently.

    Due to the pandemic, not all citizens are able to go out of the confort of their homes and go and vote, so the government decided to proceed with the mail-in ballots. According to Brookings.edu, “This scorecard does not attempt to gauge overall voter experiences or cover all aspects of the voting system. It is a forward-looking and evolving analysis of what states are doing now to expand access and improve the process of voting by absentee ballot or via a universal vote-by-mail system, thereby improving voting in a pandemic.” This statement explains how the uses of mail-in ballots are a better solution for the citizens than the usual voting system.

    Some people might argue that the mail-in ballot system is less reliable due to the loss of mail, even though that can be true, but in the end mail-in ballots are safer for the citizens due to the pandemic. New laws are being passed inorder to make the election process safer and more reliable.

    [read less]

    The United States of America’s voting rights are protected because of the amount of bills and laws that are currently in the making inorder to ensur…

    [read more]
    0
  • Hannah from North Carolina

    Voting rights are sufficiently protected in the United States as they currently are and no new laws should be added to change them. Nothing that occurs through the voting process is unconstitutional in any way. Voting rights are sufficiently protected in the United States because there are numerous requirements that must be considered to even be eligible to vote, the process of counting votes has so many guidelines and protocols it cannot be cheated, and specific forms of voting only work to make it easier for more people to vote.
    There are so many laws already in place that make it difficult for anyone not meeting the requirements to vote. Currently, to be able to vote in any U.S. election a person must be eighteen years old, a United States citizen, meet the state’s residency requirements, and are registered to vote by the registration deadline (USAGov). If there is any sort of problem with your voting registration, for example your name not being on the registration list, you are still able to vote that day, but it is counted as a provisional vote. Later on, government officials look into your background and decide if you are eligible to vote or not. If you are then your vote is counted, if not then it is discarded (American Civil Liberties Union).
    There is a long meticulous process that takes place when counting votes making it nearly impossible to cheat the results. “While the specific measures vary, in accordance with state and local election laws and practices, such security measures include signature matching, information checks, barcodes, watermarks, and precise paper weights.” (CISA). With these protocols in place, being able to swing an election due to cheating of the votes is unlikely. There is so much effort and double checking that goes into the procedure when counting, that misinformation couldn’t be collected amongst the polls.
    Specific forms of voting such as Mail-in don’t allow for votes to be counted twice, instead just make it easier for more people to vote. There is no disadvantage among others who vote at the polls than those who use mail-in ballots. Their votes have exactly the same power in influencing the next political leader. In an article written by Dennis Aftergut he discusses how mail-in voting is used to allow everyone qualified in the U.S. to vote. He claims that there is a new voter suppression law in some states that forbids mail-in voting altogether. This makes it difficult for those who cannot physically get to the polls to vote and decreases the chance of a fair voice being heard across the country.
    Having access to vote is a very important part of our civil duty as an American citizen. Making all of these restrictions to try and reduce fraud in the voting process wouldn’t limit the cheating but instead the voices of millions. Voting rights, as is, are sufficient enough and shouldn’t be changed because the requirements to be eligible to vote are specific, guidelines in place at polls restrict misconduct amongst ballot counters, and the different types of voting are necessary to allow everyone access to vote.

    Citations

    Aftergut, Dennis. “Congress Has a Massive Voting Rights Bill in Its Grasp. It Must Pass It, Now | Dennis Aftergut.” The Guardian, Guardian News and Media, 22 Sept. 2021, https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2021/sep/22/congress-must-pass-voting-rights-bill.
    “Election Security Rumor vs. Reality.” Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency CISA, 23 Sept. 2021, https://www.cisa.gov/rumorcontrol.
    “Voting Rights.” Know Your Rights | American Civil Liberties Union, https://www.aclu.org/know-your-rights/voting-rights/.
    “Who Can and Can’t Vote in U.S. Elections.” USAGov, 4 Oct. 2021, https://www.usa.gov/who-can-vote.

    [read less]

    Voting rights are sufficiently protected in the United States as they currently are and no new laws should be added to change them. Nothing that occur…

    [read more]
    0
  • Johan from North Carolina

    Voting Rights are being protected in the United States. There are two reasons to back this claim. First of all, there are already regulations on who is eligible to vote. Another reason is that the United States government passed laws to make sure that everyone has the right to vote.
    Voting rights have been protected by the regulations and amendments the United States government ratified in order to let eligible voters vote. One amendment that regulates the eligibility of voting is the Twenty-Sixth Amendment. The Twenty-Sixth Amendment was ratified in 1971 and it “lowered the voting age to eighteen in all state and federal elections” (Fish). This amendment was passed to make sure that the country doesn’t have any minors that can vote in an election, especially that minors don’t have the knowledge and the understanding when it comes to politics compared to adults. Another amendment that helps regulate the eligibility for voting is the Fourteenth Amendment. The Fourteenth Amendment was ratified in 1868 and it was originally intended to grant “citizenship to African Americans born or naturalized in the United States” (Skeels). Now the Fourteenth Amendment grants citizenship to all citizens who were born or naturalized in the United States. To be eligible to vote in the United States as of 2021, it is required that all voters are American citizens to ensure that American non-citizens are not affecting the election. The age requirement and citizenship requirements still allow the majority of the people of the United States to vote while keeping the voting eligibility regulated.
    Voting rights have been protected because the United States government is putting effort into passing laws that let the majority of the population of the United States to vote. In the early years of the United States, only white men who owned property can vote, throughout time, however, the United States government passed laws to let all American citizens vote. Before 1920, women around the country were protesting for women’s suffrage. The Nineteenth Amendment was ratified in 1920 and it provides “the right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex” (McClain). This amendment granted women the right to vote. Women since then have greatly contributed to the results of presidential elections, especially that women affected the outcome of the Presidential Election of 2020. Another law that helps let everyone have the freedom to vote is the Voting Rights Act of 1965. “Section 2 of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, which has traditionally afforded minority group members the opportunity to challenge discriminatory electoral policies that thwart the ability ‘to participate in the political process and to elect representatives of their choice’” (Schenck). The Voting Rights Act of 1965 banned racial discrimination during elections and let people of different races vote freely. These two laws help protect voting rights for women and people of color.
    With all things considered, voting rights are protected in the United States because there are laws that regulate who is eligible to vote and there are laws that allow the majority of American citizens to vote. Even though the Election of 2020 is corrupted with the voting ballots and some laws having been put in place for voter suppression makes it seem that voting rights are not protected, however, there are many laws that protect individuals’ voting rights.

    [read less]

    Voting Rights are being protected in the United States. There are two reasons to back this claim. First of all, there are already regulations on who i…

    [read more]
    0
  • Casey from North Carolina

    In recent years, especially in the 2020 presidential election, the authenticity of elections was challenged to an extent not recently seen before. As a result of this the concept of voters rights was also questioned, many began to claim that new voting rights were being put in place during elections in order to prevent others and certain demographics from voting in the coming election. While one could say that laws have recently been put in place to prevent others from voting. For the most part, many new laws put in place were done in order to make sure that mail in ballots were authentic, because in the year 2020 they had been used in a never before seen amount. Many rules were put in place to make sure that the usage of mail in ballots was not taken advantage of and so that ballot counters could verify that a voter was in fact who they said they were and that no one was voting on their behalf with or without their knowledge.
    One of these said laws was the initiation of photo identification usage for voting in this election. Many people claimed that the law was put in place to prevent the poverty stricken and people of color from voting, stating that the rules made it harder for them to vote. However, photo identification is used in numerous facets of our lives, one needs photo identification to apply for a job, buy a home, drive a car, and buy alcohol and tobacco products, and the list goes on. From a statistical standpoint it can be inferred that most people, regardless of their race or financial status, have probably partaken in an activity in which they neeeded photo identification to do. Photo identification cannot restrict the voting of others if nearly every person in America has used photo identification before and likely had a photo id. Photo identification is not restricting voting, it is verifying voters and making sure that others do not use the identity of another person in order to vote once or multiple times for a candidate they support.
    Another argument is that voters of color are disproportionately restricted from voting due to strict laws restricting people with previous felonies from voting. While this barrier is prevalent, it is not something created specifically to combat people of color . If one wanted to make the argument that there is racism within the justice system then that would be more understandable, but at that point the call for change should be directed for justice system reform or felon-treatment reform. Taking a situation in which people of color are predominantly more likely to have felonies does not mean that restricting felony voting is racially motivated. There is correlation in the fact that a majority of felons are people of color, but that does not mean that the fact there are many people of color who are felons is the cause for the creation of laws that restrict felons from voting.
    Many people on both sides of the political spectrum have tried to create laws or strategies to affect elections, gerrymandering has been a common practice in the past in which politicians have changed district lines to make it to where they could affect election outcomes within those districts. Many have tried to restrict voting rights and at times it has succeeded, but systematically voting rights have not been suppressed. There have been laws put in place that might inconvenience some for the sake of verifying voters, or laws that coincidentally affect a certain demographic, but that does not mean that voting rights are being restricted. No voting law is specifically targeting a demographic and because of this it is prevalent that as a whole, voting rights are protected in america.

    [read less]

    In recent years, especially in the 2020 presidential election, the authenticity of elections was challenged to an extent not recently seen before. As …

    [read more]
    0
  • Kinsley Tate from North Carolina

    As an extensive bill supporting the extension of voting rights has made its way through Congress, the need for further voting accessibility has been debated. Due to the lack of limitations on voting of any demographic, as well as the need for certain restrictions on voting for integrity, our voting rights are sufficiently protected and do not need to be expanded.
    The Freedom to Vote Act that is currently being debated in Congress aims to increase voting rights by increasing access to and facilitating the process of voting in national elections (Aftergut). Currently, the United States allows any citizen who is both of age and of sound mind to vote, a major milestone compared to the suffrage-filled US that only allowed Caucasian, male property owners to vote just decades prior. Further, since the twenty-fourth amendment, poll taxes have been banned at the national level to encourage citizens of all economic standings to make their voice heard (Library of Congress). An additional step that some states have taken has been to automatically register voters when a driver’s license is obtained, accomplishing one of the many goals of the Freedom to Vote Act (Aftergut). Overall, each of these steps to encourage voting taken by the federal government accomplish the goal of protecting voting rights, causing there to be no need for further adjustments. In fact, bills such as the Freedom to Vote Act, that open up access to voting even more, only end up “federaliz[ing] our elections” and “violat[ing] our freedom of speech” (Freedom to Vote Act: New name, same bad bill).
    In addition to addressing a topic that is not problematic, voting rights do not need to be extended further because legitimacy and validity of election results will be lost. One of the methods of increasing voting rights is to encourage mail-in-ballots, which are simply accurate because of ease of tampering or forgery. In fact, investigations of ballots from the 2020 election found forged ballots under the name of deceased citizens (Election results: 2020 Analysis of rejected ballots). As a result of this lack of legitimacy in mail-in-ballots, they can simply not be encouraged as an accurate measure of voter preferences.
    Even though some may argue that voting rights are not properly protected because of illegal adjustments such as gerrymandering, the issue has been established as unconstitutional, and efforts are being taken to prevent it (Kubel). Due to the efforts already put in place by the federal government to protect the rights of voters, as well as the lack of accountability in many reform efforts, the rights of voters in the United States are properly protected.

    Aftergut, D. (2021, September 22). Congress has a massive voting rights bill in its grasp. it must pass it, now | dennis aftergut. The Guardian. Retrieved November 2, 2021, from https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2021/sep/22/congress-must-pass-voting-rights-bill.
    Election results, 2020: Analysis of rejected ballots. Ballotpedia. (2021, September 10). Retrieved November 2, 2021, from https://ballotpedia.org/Election_results,_2020:_Analysis_of_rejected_ballots.
    Freedom to Vote Act: New name, same bad bill. FreedomWorks. (2021, October 6). Retrieved November 2, 2021, from https://www.freedomworks.org/content/freedom-vote-act-new-name-same-bad-bill.
    Library of Congress. (n.d.). U.S. Constitution – Twenty-Sixth Amendment | Resources … Constitution Annotated. Retrieved November 2, 2021, from https://constitution.congress.gov/constitution/amendment-26/.
    Kubel, P. (2021, March 19). How to stop gerrymandering and protect voters’ rights. How to Stop Gerrymandering and Protect Voters’ Rights. Retrieved November 2, 2021, from https://www.impactree.com/blog/gerrymandering/.

    [read less]

    As an extensive bill supporting the extension of voting rights has made its way through Congress, the need for further voting accessibility has been d…

    [read more]
    0
  • Will from North Carolina

    Recently, the senate had passed a bill that would further protect the rights of voters. According to CNN, it “would make it easier to register to vote, make Election Day a public holiday, ensure states have early voting for federal elections and allow all voters to request mail-in ballots.” I believe that the bill is unnecessary because it shrinks the time-span of the given days to vote and instead limits a select number of citizens from voting.

    Some of the provisions in the bill involve limiting the amount of days a citizen can vote in the way that it “ends same-day registration” and “cuts the state’s 17-day early voting period by one full week.”(Rapoport) By minimizing which days a citizen can come to vote, it reduces all the voters who work long hours or have been out of town on the specified voting dates. The current laws of the United States provide a reasonable amount of time for voters to register and vote, deeming the bill unnecessary.

    This bill also discriminates against minority populations and the younger population who are motivated to get involved before they are legally able to vote. In the state of North Carolina, they “​​encourage high-schoolers to pre-register, so they can begin participating as soon as they turn 18–not anymore, under this bill.”(Rapoport) To me, as a person who wants to be involved as a high school student, it does not provide opportunities to become involved in politics. Additionally, there are other provisions in the bill that are unfavorable to minorities, like “prohibiting paid voter registration drives” which attracts more minority voters. With these guidelines being instituted in the new bill, the bill does more to suppress certain voting groups than it does to attract more of the population. It does not serve the purpose the bill is trying to achieve, which is creating easier access to voting.

    By and large, the bill does not promote voting equality, but instead restrains voting opportunities for minority groups and younger voters as well as hindering the amount of time given to voters. People who find the bill successful in its goal might say that it offers protection to their vote, but in reality it does nothing to support the minimum wage workers or flexibility of the average citizen.

    [read less]

    Recently, the senate had passed a bill that would further protect the rights of voters. According to CNN, it “would make it easier to register to vo…

    [read more]
    0
  • Abby from North Carolina

    Voting rights in the US are already substantially protected because citizens are not forced to vote, and issues such as voting fraud are not a high concern in the US. Voting in the US is safe because voters have the choice to vote. Voting is not mandatory therefore if voters want to opt out of voting they can. Voting is also a right to American citizens. As stated in the USA Gov Voting and Election Laws article, “According to the U.S. Constitution, voting is a right.” The right to vote is protected by the constitution as well as other amendments, bills, and pieces of legislation. An example would be John R. Lewis Voting Rights Advancement Act 2021. “The John Lewis Voting Rights Act would modernize and revitalize the VRA by strengthening legal protections against discriminatory voting policies.” (Kevin Morris, Peter Miller, et al.) By eliminating any discrimination that may have been in voting in the past, legislation is working to reduce that to increase fairness and protection of voting. Voting rights are also protected because of legal legislative laws. Laws such as an age requirement, registering to vote, and being a US citizen are put into place to ensure voting is as safe and secure as possible.
    Voting fraud has never been a big problem in the US and just as anything else there are always risks of fraud. Most of the time there are miscommunications or mistakes that lead belief to fraud in voting. “However, extensive research reveals that fraud is very rare, voter impersonation is virtually nonexistent, and many instances of alleged fraud are, in fact, mistakes by voters or administrators.” (Feldman, Max, et al.) Because of all the requirements and registration that voting includes, voter fraud is rare. As we see that in person voter fraud rates are low, some may argue that mail-in ballots are riskier and unsafe. In a news article by Bellovin, he states, “These security measures bring the integrity of mail-in ballots to levels very close to those of in-person ballots, while also considerably increasing availability.” The security measures mentioned include, “To do that, we must start with the standard definition of security: “confidentiality, integrity, availability.” (Bellovin) With these measures put into place mail-in absentee ballots are just as confidential and trustworthy as in person votes.
    Voting rights in the US are substantially protected whether voters choose to go in person or use an absentee ballot by security measures and legal requirements. Many legislative actions have been put into place to ensure citizens feel safe and protected when voting.

    Citations:
    USA Gov. “Voting and Election Laws.” USAGov, 4 Oct. 2021, https://www.usa.gov/voting-laws.
    Kevin Morris Peter Miller, et al. “Strengthening the Voting Rights Act.” Brennan Center for Justice, 20 Aug. 2021, https://www.brennancenter.org/issues/ensure-every-american-can-vote/voting-reform/strengthening-voting-rights-act.
    Feldman, Max, et al. “The Myth of Voter Fraud.” Brennan Center for Justice, 27 May 2020, https://www.brennancenter.org/issues/ensure-every-american-can-vote/vote-suppression/myth-voter-fraud.
    Bellovin, Steven M., and Steven M. Bellovin. “Mail-in Ballots Are Secure, Confidential, and Trustworthy.” Columbia News, 23 Oct. 2020, https://news.columbia.edu/in-mail-absentee-ballots-secure-vote-election.

    [read less]

    Voting rights in the US are already substantially protected because citizens are not forced to vote, and issues such as voting fraud are not a high co…

    [read more]
    0
  • Owen from North Carolina

    I do believe that the United States has sufficiently protected voting rights. The first thing you always do is to show your ID to a person before being able to go vote. This allows for the person to see if you are eligible to vote in the first place. This is a very easy safe measurement to make sure people don’t vote multiple times or the wrong person doesn’t cruise on in and vote.

    This wrong person would be someone who is convicted of a felony. If that person isn’t cleared to vote then the protections put into place won’t allow them to vote. Convicted felons can change their ways and if they put themselves in the right circumstances, then a judge can decide on if they are allowed to vote again.

    Opposing views would bring up gerrymandering and how it affects the integrity of voting. Gerrymandering allows for states to almost hand pick what party they want to win in any certain election. In most states voting areas are split up in very specific ways to almost cut off the votes in a way to only let one side win. North Caroline has gerrymandering in it but it’s not too big of a deal. This doesn’t exclude the fact that voting rights have been protected throughout the years after the United States allowed everyone the right to vote. Any race of American can vote and any gender can vote, it hasnt been like that for a long time but laws have been put in place where these rights stay permanent.

    A bill in Texas had been proposed, regarding the accessibility to vote. The bill tried to make it easier to vote, having election day be a national holiday, and allowing anyone to request a mail-in-ballot. These are all things that would make the protection of voting rights diminish but the bill also brought in a much bigger security system and would fairly redraw voting lines.

    With many protections already put into place, It is safe to say that America has done a great job with the protection of voting rights for the whole nation. Many people don’t even think about their ID getting checked because its just the normal thing to do but is a vital step to the voting process. Rules that come so natural to the people that have to follow them are rules that are efficient and make sense to have.

    Diaz, Daniella. “House Democrats Urge Senate Colleagues to Pass Voting Rights Bill This Week.” CNN, Cable News Network, 18 Oct. 2021, https://www.cnn.com/2021/10/18/politics/house-democrats-voting-rights-bill-senate/index.html.

    Williamson, Kevin D. “Why Not Fewer Voters?” National Review, National Review, 7 Apr. 2021, https://www.nationalreview.com/2021/04/why-not-fewer-voters/).

    [read less]

    I do believe that the United States has sufficiently protected voting rights. The first thing you always do is to show your ID to a person before bein…

    [read more]
    0
  • Brielle from North Carolina

    I believe that voting rights in the United States are protected through the Constitution and its Amendments. In the past months, voter fraud and the protection of our voting rights has been a major controversy in our country due to the rise in mail-in ballots in the recent election. However, I believe everyone’s right to vote is protected through the Constitution. In addition to that, the government has also passed laws to protect our rights, implementing voting restrictions. You have to be above 18 years old, you have to be an American citizen, and you can not have any felony convictions on your record. However, they do not discriminate against any race, gender, or religion. Everyone has the right to vote.

    Throughout history, the Constitution has been improved and expanded to help protect the voting rights of US citizens. This is seen in the 15th Amendment, which gave black men the right to vote. This is seen in the 19th Amendment, which gave women the right to vote. And this is seen in the 24th Amendment, which eliminated the poll tax of 1964 that made it almost impossible for low income citizens to vote. The Constitution has been the foundation of this country and values it was built upon… equality. Because of the Constitution, I believe that voting rights are sufficiently protected in the United States.

    Voting rights are also protected by the government and the laws that they pass. For example, in Wyoming, a bill was signed by Governor Mark Gordon that requires voters to present an ID to allow them to vote. The bill, HB0075, requires voters to show some form of identification that shows that they meet the requirements to vote, whether it be a driver’s license, passport, or an insurance card when going to in person ballots. Governor Gordon says, “It is a necessary function of our Republic to provide our citizens with confidence that our elections are secure, fair, and valid.” Our government is passing laws daily to protect our voting rights, while making voting more accessible by opening up more polls and now allowing mail-in ballots.

    [read less]

    I believe that voting rights in the United States are protected through the Constitution and its Amendments. In the past months, voter fraud and the p…

    [read more]
    0
  • Jackson from North Carolina

    Voting rights are most definitely protected in the United States. Not only are voting rights protected by having the right to vote, but there are also laws that protect voting in a way of stopping fraudulent votes. There are also constitutional amendments in place that were put in place to make voting a right for everyone despite differences in sex, race, and other differences that help to make our country so unique.
    Voting rights in the United States are protected by a legislature that is in place to prevent voter fraud. According to the USA government website, “Two-thirds of states require you to show some form of identification before you’re allowed to vote.” This extra form of identification and verification helps to keep elections valid and make sure that your vote is valuable, and that your vote is protected against fraud and not essentially cancelled out by fake votes. If there were no laws such as these in place, elections would be rampant with voter fraud. Coming from Hans A. Von Spakovsky of The Heritage Foundation, “Voter ID can significantly defeat and deter impersonation fraud at the polls, voting under fictitious names or in the names of dead voters, double-voting by individuals registered in more than one state, and voting by individuals who are in the United States illegally.” These laws play an important role in the protection of voting rights in the United States.
    Voting rights are also granted and protected by the constitution. The 15th, 19th, 24th, and 26th amendments all helped to make voting fair in the United States. The whitehouse provides the information, “Today, citizens over the age of 18 cannot be denied the right to vote on the basis of race, religion, sex, disability, or sexual orientation.” These amendments are the root of voting right protections, and help establish our voting rights. While we have the right to vote, there are also laws in the making that plan to make voting easier. There are laws such as the freedom to vote act in the making. “The Freedom to Vote Act will transform voting in America”(Aftergut). This act makes voting even easier, increasing more people’s voice.

    Aftergut, Dennis. “Congress Has a Massive Voting Rights Bill in Its Grasp. It Must Pass It, Now .” The Guardian, Guardian News and Media, 22 Sept. 2021, https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2021/sep/22/congress-must-pass-voting-rights-bill.
    “Elections and Voting.” The White House, The United States Government, 19 Jan. 2021, https://www.whitehouse.gov/about-the-white-house/our-government/elections-and-voting/.
    Von Sparksky, Hans A. “Voter ID Laws Protect the Integrity of Our Democracy …” U.S.News, https://www.usnews.com/debate-club/should-photo-id-be-required-to-vote/voter-id-laws-protect-the-integrity-of-our-democracy.
    “Voting and Election Laws.” USAGov, https://www.usa.gov/voting-laws.

    [read less]

    Voting rights are most definitely protected in the United States. Not only are voting rights protected by having the right to vote, but there are also…

    [read more]
    0
  • Sarah from North Carolina

    Voting rights are, and will continue to be, protected in the United States. Voting is every U.S. citizen’s responsibility. There have been major improvements towards voting rights and ensuring every American gets the chance to vote.
    Many efforts to make voting convenient and as fair as possible have already been implemented. One example of this is the increased accessibility to absentee voting. “Since the 2020 election, 17 states have enacted legislation that makes it easier to vote, such as legislation that registers voters automatically and expands access to early or absentee voting” (facinghistory.org). Absentee voting is the process of casting your vote through the mail. This is convenient for many people who can’t go in person and otherwise wouldn’t be able to vote. The voter turnout has greatly increased, which means more Americans are giving their voice. “In 2020, for the first time in this nation’s history, over 159 million people voted in a presidential election. This demonstrates that objectively speaking more Americans than ever are exercising their right to the franchise” (constitutioncenter.org). The more voters there are, the more the general population is represented in an election. There have been a few setbacks in voting rights, such as the effects of the Shelby County v. Holder decision. “The Supreme Court’s 2013 decision in Shelby County v. Holder to strike down portions of the 1965 Voting Rights Act has made it easier for states to enact new restrictions on voting, and many of these new restrictions are being challenged in the courts, with critics arguing that they disproportionately affect voters who are racial minorities, poor, or young” (facinghistory.org). While these setbacks should certainly be considered, it is also important to recognize that so much progress has been made towards making voting easier and more inclusive. It should also be noted that according to the Elections Clause, “neither Congress nor the states may attempt to dictate electoral outcomes, or favor or disfavor certain classes of candidates” (constitutioncenter.org).
    The future of voting is even better than the current situation. The Senate voted on the Freedom to Vote Act, which is an act that yields many benefits. These benefits include “15 days of early voting[,]… election day becom[ing] a holiday[, and]… mak[ing] it a felony to communicate election lies or to interfere with citizens’ access to the polls” (The Guardian). Having these benefits makes it even more convenient to vote. Having a driver’s license to vote, which was a previous factor that restricted voting, has even been changed. “But now a utility bill, bank statement or school ID will be accepted as ID – rather than only a driver’s license, which some voters don’t have” (The Guardian). Another way that the Freedom to Vote Act encourages voters is that “16-year-olds applying for a driver’s license will be automatically registered to vote at 18”. Also, citizens who were once imprisoned will also be guaranteed a chance to vote (The Guardian). The Freedom to Vote Act largely gains support, with “72% of the American public support[ing] policies in the Freedom to Vote Act”, according to a poll by ALG Research (The Guardian). The Freedom to Vote Act will strengthen our country and allow ideas from many Americans to be shared (CNN).
    Voting is one of the best ways to make a difference in the United States. The preexisting voting rights combined with the new benefits of the Freedom to Vote Act will bring prosperity to the U.S. as more and more voters cast their beliefs. The progress made towards protecting voter’s rights is encouraging for the future of voting.

    “Congress Has a Massive Voting Rights Bill in Its Grasp. It Must Pass It, Now | Dennis Aftergut.” The Guardian, Guardian News and Media, 22 Sept. 2021, https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2021/sep/22/congress-must-pass-voting-rights-bill.
    Diaz, Daniella. “House Democrats Urge Senate Colleagues to Pass Voting Rights Bill This Week.” CNN, Cable News Network, 18 Oct. 2021, https://www.cnn.com/2021/10/18/politics/house-democrats-voting-rights-bill-senate/index.html.
    “Elections Clause.” Interpretation: Elections Clause | The National Constitution Center, https://constitutioncenter.org/interactive-constitution/interpretation/article-i/clauses/750#:~:text=The%20Elections%20Clause%20gives%20the,or%20%E2%80%9Cmake%E2%80%9D%20its%20own.
    “Voting Rights in the United States.” Facing History and Ourselves, https://www.facinghistory.org/educator-resources/current-events/voting-rights-united-states.

    [read less]

    Voting rights are, and will continue to be, protected in the United States. Voting is every U.S. citizen’s responsibility. There have been major imp…

    [read more]
    0
  • Reagan from North Carolina

    The United States political system is founded on the importance of having government officials elected by the people. This means that the right to vote is seen as an important privilege within this country, and is recognized as one of the many things that makes up American democracy. America has grown as a nation from where it first started in many ways, but one of these ways is how the right to vote has expanded to all citizens within the country. Voting rights in the U.S. are sufficiently protected through amendments to the constitution and through acts that ensure people’s right to vote.
    Voting in the U.S. has progressed over time. It is no secret that when our country was first founded only white men who held property had the right to vote. However, this unfair law has changed with time, even if it took too long. The Constitution has added several amendments to allow more people the right to vote, and to stop discrimination when it came to voting. In an article written by two professors of law, Richard Pildes and Bradley Smith, they cited these amendments writing that, “…the Fifteenth Amendment prohibits racial discrimination in the vote; the Nineteenth Amendment prohibits discrimination based on sex; the Twenty-Fourth Amendment prohibits the use of poll taxes in national elections; and the Twenty-Sixth Amendment prohibits denying the vote to those over 18 years of age.” (Pildes & Smith) These amendments to the constitution secure our rights to vote, and that Americans cannot be denied this right. While state requirements to vote vary from things like photo ID or no photo ID, the right to vote is still all the same. The right to vote is mostly guaranteed for American citizens, though that does not mean proper identification and documentation should not be required.
    In addition to amendments in the constitution, the U.S. government created the Voting Rights Act of 1965. The Voting Rights Act ensured voters the right to vote without being discriminated against. This act has, “…prohibited voter discrimination based on race, color, or membership in a language minority group. It also required certain places to provide election materials in languages besides English.” (“Voting and Election Laws”) The Voting Rights Act continues to protect the rights of people to vote. It even goes further by having election materials presented in other languages, which increases the ability of those that are not native English speakers to participate in elections. The act even placed limits on states who have had a history of voter discrimination, to further limit their discriminatory practices. Americans’ rights to vote are protected by these acts and the Constitution, guaranteeing their ballots to be seen and counted.

    [read less]

    The United States political system is founded on the importance of having government officials elected by the people. This means that the right to vot…

    [read more]
    0
  • Peyton from North Carolina

    United States Voting rights are sufficiently protected. In the United States everyone has the right to vote and use their voice, with this being said people are encouraged to use this right but are never forced. The United States actively takes steps to protect voting rights through legislation and the American peoples right to vote is protected through amendments.
    The United States government provides protection through new legislation. The most recent piece of legislation that the Senate is in the process of passing is The Freedom to Vote Act. According to CNN the new act “would bolster security on voting systems” through allowing the request of mail in ballots, easier voting registration, and the insurance of early voting. With all of these new precautions the voter is adequately protected and represented assuring elections are the most accurate. The Guardian gives further insight on the Act saying “ the act allows removals of election officials only for misconduct and gives them a right to sue for wrongful removal.” This limits the use of persuasion by pollsters on innocent voters that are just exercising their rights.
    The United States government protects voting rights through constitutional amendments. As the United States evolved, our constitution evolved with it. The United States government added the 14th, 15th, 19th, 24th, and 26th amendments that all protect US citizens as active voters. These amendments state that states are not allowed to burden a citizen’s right to vote, race nor gender denies a citizen the right to vote, prohibits the use of poll taxes, and establishes a voting age of 18 (BallotPedia). The Constitution established steps to a democracy by “ensuring an explicit right to vote… guarant[ing] the voting rights of every citizen of voting age, ensure that every vote is counted correctly, and defend against attempts to effectively disenfranchise eligible voters (FairVote).” The Constitution established the right to vote and protects this right to vote by evolving and modernizing as the United States advances.
    Though most voting rights are protected through the voting system, there is an outlier in the system. Convicted felons and Americans living overseas may not always be represented in the election process. FairVote mentions that “5 million Americans convicted of felonies who have already completed their sentences are permanently disenfranchised” while also stating “Americans living overseas have trouble registering in their home district, because their state may not consider them residents anymore.” As a result elections are not as accurate as they could be since all Americans are not represented.
    Although there is some misrepresentation in the voting system, the majority of voting rights are protected by the United States government. The use of legislation and constitutional amendments allows American citizens to exercise their right to vote, now people just have to use it.

    FairVote.org, FairVote. “Right to Vote Amendment.” FairVote, n.d., https://www.fairvote.org/right_to_vote_amendment.
    Ballot , Pedia. “Federal Constitutional Voting Protections.” Ballotpedia, n.d., https://ballotpedia.org/Federal_Constitutional_Voting_Protections.

    [read less]

    United States Voting rights are sufficiently protected. In the United States everyone has the right to vote and use their voice, with this being said …

    [read more]
    0
  • Kemorah from North Carolina

    Voting rights are legal and constitutional protections that guarantee most adult citizens the opportunity to vote in local, state and federal elections (Duignan, Brian.) In the United States, voting rights are sufficiently protected. This protection is exemplified in the fact that there is no law, bill or amendment that inhibits an eligible voter’s voting rights. Also in the fact that proposed laws and bills aimed to give more people the ability to vote would not remove an illegal barrier preventing them from voting beforehand.
    In the United States, there is no law, bill or amendment that inhibits one’s voting rights. If you are eligible to vote, you can. That is not to say that there may be personal/situational barriers to voting for some people, but if congress took every personal/situational barrier into consideration, our world would be much more unfair. Those who believe that voting rights are not sufficiently protected in the United States may believe that certain voting laws promote voter suppression and limit the ability to vote for some, but that is not necessarily the case. Certain laws are put in place to guarantee that those voting are responsible and understand that elections are a serious situation. Congress could make it easier to vote, adding to the numbers, but would you have to ask yourself, would you feel comfortable if it was made easier for people to become surgeons, teachers or lawyers? It is common to look down upon people who do jobs they are not qualified for, voting should be held to that same standard (Williamson, Kevin D.)
    Proposed laws and bills with the goal to reduce voter suppression would not remove an illegal barrier to voting. An argument of those who believe that voting rights are not sufficiently protected in the United States might be that by not making election day a holiday limits the ability for some to vote since their jobs don’t allow them to take off to get to the polls. Although that is a valid problem, it is not one that causes voter suppression; it is not congress’ fault that some people can’t get off work in time or at all to make it to the polls, that kind of issue should be taken up with the person, company, corporation, etc. that they work for. For example, a legislation proposed in September called the Freedom to Vote Act could possibly be passed soon. According to long-time reporter, Daniella Diaz, the Freedom to Vote Act would “make it easier to register to vote, make Election Day a public holiday, ensure states have early voting for federal elections and allow all voters to request mail-in ballots.” It would also allow fifteen days of early voting for those who chose to vote in person (Aftergut, Dennis.) If the Freedom to Vote Act were to be passed, it would make it easier for those affected to vote, but it would not remove a barrier that was illegal, preventing them beforehand.
    While some may see the current protection placed upon voting rights in the United States as unfair and flawed, voting rights are sufficiently protected. This protection can be seen in the fact that there is no law, bill or amendment that inhibits an eligible voter’s voting rights. Also in the fact that proposed laws and bills aimed to give more people the ability to vote would not remove an illegal barrier preventing them from voting beforehand.

    Works Cited
    Aftergut, Dennis. “Congress Has a Massive Voting Rights Bill in Its Grasp. It Must Pass It, Now.” The Guardian, Guardian News and Media, 22 Sept. 2021, https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2021/sep/22/congress-must-pass-voting-rights-bill.
    Diaz, Daniella. “House Democrats Urge Senate Colleagues to Pass Voting Rights Bill This Week.” CNN, Cable News Network, 18 Oct. 2021, https://www.cnn.com/2021/10/18/politics/house-democrats-voting-rights-bill-senate/index.html.
    Duignan, Brian. “Voting Rights.” Encyclopedia Britannica, Encyclopedia Britannica, Inc., 6 July 2021, https://www.britannica.com/topic/voting-rights.
    “How Do States Protect and Verify Absentee/Mail-in Ballots? (2020).” Ballotpedia, https://ballotpedia.org/How_do_states_protect_and_verify_absentee/mail-in_ballots%3F_(2020).
    Williamson, Kevin D. “Why Not Fewer Voters?” National Review, National Review, 7 Apr. 2021, https://www.nationalreview.com/2021/04/why-not-fewer-voters/.

    [read less]

    Voting rights are legal and constitutional protections that guarantee most adult citizens the opportunity to vote in local, state and federal election…

    [read more]
    0
  • Xochie from Utah

    Voting rights are sufficiently protected, anybody is allowed the right to vote. Nobody is forced to. When people do vote, they are protected and, almost, served to do the citizen’s job. It’s a priority, yes, but everyone has a choice. It all is protected.

    [read less]

    Voting rights are sufficiently protected, anybody is allowed the right to vote. Nobody is forced to. When people do vote, they are protected and, almo…

    [read more]
    0
  • lilly from Missouri

    Voting rights are being protected because it is not breaking the law if you chose not to vote. If you don’t want to vote then you don’t have to. They are allowing different ways to vote, making it easier for some people to vote if they aren’t able to leave their house or take off that amount of time off at work.

    [read less]

    Voting rights are being protected because it is not breaking the law if you chose not to vote. If you don’t want to vote then you don’t have to. They …

    [read more]
    0
  • Kelsy from North Carolina

    Yes, I think Voting Rights are sufficiently protected in the United States. In the United States, no one is required by law to vote in any presidential election. According to the United States constitution voting is a right and not mandatory. Many voting laws and constitutional amendments have been ratified but none of them have made voting a requirement. This shows that United States citizens’ voting rights are protected.
    There are many requirements you must meet before you can vote. For example, found in the article “who can and can’t vote in U.S elections”, you can vote in the United States elections if you are a United States citizen, if you meet your state’s residency requirement, if you are eighteen years old before or on election day, and lastly, you are registered to vote. Voting is essential to many people because it allows their voices to be heard, as found on the website https://www.usa.gov/voting-laws everyone is allowed to vote no matter what your race or gender. Even U.S Military leaders are given the chance to vote while, in war and overseas.
    Many people mistake that the votes and ballots can easily be changed and tampered with. However, this isn’t true as found on the website “ The conservation” the authors’ Charlotte Hill and James Grumbach show the numerous ways votes are being protected. For example, only valid voters can get a ballot in the mail ballots are not sent to homes by accident, and “many states mail them to all registered voters automatically.” It is also very hard to duplicate and fake mail-in ballots. “The ballots are not returned in any old envelope but an official government envelope mailed directly to the voter along with the ballot itself.” This proves that voting rights are being protected in many ways in the United States.
    Many people could argue that in-person voting fraud is very rare and identification laws are a burden, Identification laws deprive many eligible voters of their right to vote because of this law. This argument does have many good points, however, voter identification prevents voter fraud and it is found that it would not decrease minority rates as many people assume. Voting rights provide sufficient protection for American citizens.

    [read less]

    Yes, I think Voting Rights are sufficiently protected in the United States. In the United States, no one is required by law to vote in any presidentia…

    [read more]
    0
  • Ava from North Carolina

    Voting rights in the United States are definitely being protected, as many states continue to create new laws this year and there are new bills that are possibly being put into place. There are various laws that are set in place in order to vote, such as being over the age of eighteen, a citizen of the United States, being a registered voter, and many different requirements because each state varies.

    Many laws have been created this year to positively impact voting rights, to ensure that they are being protected. According to CNN Politics, “Nineteen states have passed 33 news laws this year that make it harder to vote, according to a recent analysis from the liberal Brennan Center for Justice.” This statement is ensuring that voting rights are being even more protected because many states are continuing to add more laws to guarantee protection.

    A newly introduced bill called the Freedom to Vote Act could possibly be adopted incorporating many ideas that would potentially help with voting rights in the United States. Some voters may not be able to attend the ballot to vote, because of their working hours and because it is not a public holiday. According to The Guardian, “For in-person voters, 15 days of early voting are guaranteed,” which is allotting that needed time for voters. This specific part of the presented voting rights law is only a small portion of what is being offered as the bill proposes a massive increase of voting rights access. According to Brookings, “Australia typically has a turnout in the 90 percent or more range, and other nations such as Argentina, Belgium, Brazil, Costa Rica, and Mexico achieve very high turnout via universal voting and time off for voting. These areas were able to do this due to making Election Day a public holiday.

    Some people may argue that voting rights are not protected enough, since people who work cannot vote in person. As mentioned above, there is a proposal for the Freedom to Vote act which incorporates fifteen days of early voting. Not to mention, there are mail-in ballots that have been offered, as many elders, people who cannot be transported, and people who are unable to attend in-person due to other reasons. This option is a great opportunity because citizens are still being able to vote, even if they are unable to make it to the ballot. During the mail-in ballots, for it to be counted, according to the Ballotpedia, “All 50 states require a valid signature for an absentee/mail-in ballot to be counted.” Each state uses multiple ways to verify one’s identity, of course with a signature but comparing the signatures with other documents on file.

    Aftergut, Dennis. “Congress Has a Massive Voting Rights Bill in Its Grasp. It Must Pass It, Now.” The Guardian, 24 Sept. 2021, http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2021/sep/22/congress-must-pass-voting-rights-bill.
    Diaz, Daniella Cnn. “House Democrats Urge Senate Colleagues to Pass Voting Rights Bill This Week – CNNPolitics.” CNN, 18 Oct. 2021, https://www.cnn.com/2021/10/18/politics/house-democrats-voting-rights-bill-senate/index.html
    “How Do States Protect and Verify Absentee/Mail-in Ballots? (2020).” Ballotpedia, https://ballotpedia.org/How_do_states_protect_and_verify_absentee/mail-in_ballots%3F_(2020)
    Accessed 31 Oct. 2021.
    West, William Gale And Darrell. “Make Election Day a National Holiday.” Brookings, 23 June 2021, http://www.brookings.edu/blog/fixgov/2021/06/23/make-election-day-a-national-holiday.

    [read less]

    Voting rights in the United States are definitely being protected, as many states continue to create new laws this year and there are new bills that a…

    [read more]
    0
  • Emilie from Missouri

    The voting rights in America are protected. As long as you meet certain requirements such as being 18 years old, being registered to vote, and not having a felony charge, then any American citizen can vote. There are mail-in ballots for anyone who cannot leave their house; although, I do not think that our Government is trustworthy enough to have integrity with that system. Those who believe our voting rights are not sufficiently protected argue that these requirements hinder our voting system because we should have as many voters as possible. The Guardian used the example that someone who committed a felony years ago should now be able to vote. I don’t agree with making exceptions in our rules and think it should be very black and white with no gray area left for interpretation. Our rules are set for good reason and everyone should still be required to show their ID, be 18 years of age, and have no felony record. It is not the quantity of votes that is important but the quality.

    [read less]

    The voting rights in America are protected. As long as you meet certain requirements such as being 18 years old, being registered to vote, and not hav…

    [read more]
    0
  • Meric from Missouri

    The voting rights are sufficiently protected. Most of the argument is about time and places for it. But we have plenty. The Guardian article states. “For in-person voters, 15 days of early voting are guaranteed. Election day becomes a holiday. The bill makes it a felony to communicate election lies or to interfere with citizens’ access to the polls.” We don’t need them no every street we just need enough for every one to get to with out to much hassle, and we do.

    [read less]

    The voting rights are sufficiently protected. Most of the argument is about time and places for it. But we have plenty. The Guardian article states. “…

    [read more]
    0
  • Rylee from Missouri

    Voting rights are as protected as they can be in the U.S. There are several requirements such as being of legal age, a registered voter, a U.S. citizen etc. Some may think mail in votes are less protected but I don’t believe they are. I think mail in votes were great for those who could not leave their house due to the pandemic but I also think they’re great when we aren’t in a pandemic. They give those who are not able to leave their home due to age, disability, etc. the chance to still get to have their say in something so important.

    [read less]

    Voting rights are as protected as they can be in the U.S. There are several requirements such as being of legal age, a registered voter, a U.S. citiz…

    [read more]
    0
  • claire from Missouri

    i agree that our voting rights are protected. Our government is very easy to vote in if you are over the age of 18 and meet the other requirements. You can even mail in a ballot. you can register to vote at your dmv.

    [read less]

    i agree that our voting rights are protected. Our government is very easy to vote in if you are over the age of 18 and meet the other requirements. Yo…

    [read more]
    0
  • avery from Missouri

    Voting rights are protected. There are a few things required to vote like being over the age of 18, be a registered voter, a citizen of the United States, etc. Also, its not complicated to become a voter if you meet the requirements. You simply can go to your states licensing bureau. Along with that, mail-in ballots exist to make voting faster and more efficient.

    [read less]

    Voting rights are protected. There are a few things required to vote like being over the age of 18, be a registered voter, a citizen of the United Sta…

    [read more]
    0
  • Leigha from Missouri

    Voter rights are protected in the US. A voter should be required to meet certain merits to be allowed to vote. For example, you must be at least 18 years old and be a US citizen to vote in America. Convicted criminals should NOT be allowed to vote because they clearly made questionable decisions in their life time and personally I don’t want to trust my country’s outcome in the hands of criminals. Also when it comes to mail in voting, I think it is a great option for those who need it. During the 2020 election we were facing a pandemic, elderly people did NOT want to risk their life by leaving their house to go to the crowded voting areas. Mail in voting allowed a chance for them to do their constitutional right safely. Many aspects of the constitution protect our voting rights.

    [read less]

    Voter rights are protected in the US. A voter should be required to meet certain merits to be allowed to vote. For example, you must be at least 18 y…

    [read more]
    0
  • Aubrey from Missouri

    I think that our voting rights are protected because almost any person over the age of 18 is legal to vote. We also have mail-in ballots that allow for people to vote from home, work, or even on holidays.

    [read less]

    I think that our voting rights are protected because almost any person over the age of 18 is legal to vote. We also have mail-in ballots that allow fo…

    [read more]
    0
  • Jolee from Missouri

    i think there are protected. they have several qualifications people need to meet to vote. there’s an age limit, have to be a legal citizen, and so on. although, there are some trivial or complicated matters ot voter fraud that’s been going around lately. however for the most part its pretty much protect. yes i think they can develop new ideas and ways they can protect this right but all in all its mostly protected.

    [read less]

    i think there are protected. they have several qualifications people need to meet to vote. there’s an age limit, have to be a legal citizen, and so …

    [read more]
    0
  • Mycha from Missouri

    Are voting rights significantly protected? This website had stated that there are ways to where you can send in your vote through the mail, however I think that that is unnecessary and not needed or fair. I feel like if voters send there ballots in through the mail it could throw the ballots off or could get lost a lot can happen with that ballot that could affect the election. Although I do feel like the qualifications for being able to register and vote are good. I think having to be 18 is good because at that age you are considered an adult and if you are considered that you should be able to make a decision of who your president is. Also I agree with all of the rest of the qualifications such as when your a criminal etc.

    [read less]

    Are voting rights significantly protected? This website had stated that there are ways to where you can send in your vote through the mail, however I …

    [read more]
    0
  • Danika from Missouri

    I believe that voting rights are protected. There’s many rules that go into voting so that it’s resonable. Like being 18 and registered to vote, a citizen of the US, and allowing everyone to vote with restrictions like for those who are mentally handicapped or criminals. There’s mail-in ballots allowing busy people to have a simple and fast way to vote. They also make it easier by letting you be able to register to vote in license bureaus. People who think that voting rights aren’t protected might say it’s because there could be voter fraud, or that it may be to compicated. There’s many things that can be done in the future to help improve the protection of the voting process, but I think it’s and efficient and safe way to vote.

    [read less]

    I believe that voting rights are protected. There’s many rules that go into voting so that it’s resonable. Like being 18 and registered to vote, a cit…

    [read more]
    0
  • Lillian from Virginia

    I believe that our Constitutional voting rights are protected. Every single person regardless of race, gender, background, etc. is allowed to go out and vote. Besides certain restrictions regarding age and citizenship, each and every person has the right to vote. However, the fairness and bipartisanship of our elections is questionable. Last year, each state had a different method of voting, some easier to tamper with than others, which made voters a little wary of the results. There were proven signs of tampering with the election, and investigations are still ongoing in regard to the results. However, the question is about our voter rights, where last year we all had the right to turn in our ballots. Even so, there was some questioning on whether or not the ballot counting process was fair or not.

    [read less]

    I believe that our Constitutional voting rights are protected. Every single person regardless of race, gender, background, etc. is allowed to go out a…

    [read more]
    0
  • Skyler from Missouri

    I beleive that they are protected to keep the people who had a different opinion from getting offened

    0
  • mackenna from Missouri

    Our voting rights are and are not protected enough. I’m on the yes and no side of things. It stated in the article by National review “There are plenty of very smart and responsible 16-year-olds who would make better voters than their dim and irresponsible older siblings or their parents. That doesn’t mean we should have 16-year-old voters — I’d be more inclined to raise the voting age to 30 — it means only that categorical decision-making by its nature does not account for certain individual differences.” I very much disagree with that statement. Yes, there maybe people who are under the age of 30 who don’t make the best voting or life choices but that does not mean people over the age of 30 are any better at voting either. You should not move the age of voting even higher because at 18 we are considered adults and should have the responsibilities of being adults. People who don’t vote just don’t do it or they feel like their vote doesn’t matter when it does in reality. Voting laws should be kept the same way they have always been except there is no need for mail in votes or making it a holiday most companies encourage you to go vote.

    [read less]

    Our voting rights are and are not protected enough. I’m on the yes and no side of things. It stated in the article by National review “There are plent…

    [read more]
    0
  • kayla from Missouri

    i believe that our voting rights are protected. i just choose not to vote in lots of things..

    0
  • bob from Indiana

    I believe that our voting rights are sufficiently protected. There are many people that are able to vote with all the qualifications that are applied. I also believe that they could develop new ideas to make more protections for voting and also to make voting more effient.

    [read less]

    I believe that our voting rights are sufficiently protected. There are many people that are able to vote with all the qualifications that are applied….

    [read more]
    0
  • william from Missouri

    i think there are protected. they have several qualifications people need to meet to vote. there’s an age limit, have to be a legal citizen, and so on. although, there are some trivial or complicated matters ot voter fraud that’s been going around lately. however for the most part its pretty much protect. yes i think they can develop new ideas and ways they can protect this right but all in all its mostly protected.

    [read less]

    i think there are protected. they have several qualifications people need to meet to vote. there’s an age limit, have to be a legal citizen, and so on…

    [read more]
    0
  • carter from Missouri

    I vote yes because there are o unconstitutional barriers to voting. mail in voting today is much easier way of voting especially for people who cant transport themselves to a voting facility .alomg with election day holidays.

    [read less]

    I vote yes because there are o unconstitutional barriers to voting. mail in voting today is much easier way of voting especially for people who cant …

    [read more]
    0
  • Peter from Alabama

    Voting rights are sufficiently protected in the United States. Obviously in terms of representation, women and minorities have long been able to vote with the 19th amendment and 15th amendment, so the suffrage of all is not contested. But what is more complex is the way that people from different economic backgrounds and cultures are supported and protected in their right to vote. With barriers like the 18 year old age restriction, and the abundance of poll locations, Americans have the ability to vote, even on a work day. Absentee ballots and mail-in ballots exist to provide means to vote for those who have some sort of voting obstacle, or simply do not want to vote in person, and the existence of poll watchers and curbside voting, voting is easily accessible for the average American adult. Even those who do not have a home can register to vote from a homeless shelter, and can make their voice heard. While there do exist restrictions, these voting restrictions are constitutional and the variety and accessibility of voting provides sufficient protection for American citizens.

    [read less]

    Voting rights are sufficiently protected in the United States. Obviously in terms of representation, women and minorities have long been able to vote …

    [read more]
    0
  • Rowan from Montana

    Voting rights are protected in the United States. There are many certain circumstances when it comes to voting. For example, The Voting Rights Act of 1965 prohibited discrimination of voter based on race, color of skin, and foreign language. Some places that were set up to hold voting for citizens required to have a materials in other language. Also you have to be old enough to know to understand why and what they are voting for and how important it id the know what is going on in the country. The United States even allows military troops that are overseas to vote.(www.usa.gov/voting-laws) Although some people believe that there voting rights aren’t protected because their race or ethnicity. Some argue that putting a limit of mail in votes and not allowing workers the day off restricts their voting rights. (think the vote) Since the 2020 election there are a lot of skeptical people who think that their voting rights are restricted because of the states that had more votes than people. This is a reasonable assumption but I believe that the voting rights are protected because in order to vote you have to be older than 18, have a drivers licence, and you have to live in the United States and be a legal citizen.

    [read less]

    Voting rights are protected in the United States. There are many certain circumstances when it comes to voting. For example, The Voting Rights Act of …

    [read more]
    0
  • Kemani from Missouri

    Voting Rights are sufficiently protected. These requirements are helpful and fair. I feel like making the age younger to vote is going to make people especially the younger generation to have a biased opinion. At 18 your a grown adult making your own decisions you have enough sense to vote on your own with your own opinion.

    [read less]

    Voting Rights are sufficiently protected. These requirements are helpful and fair. I feel like making the age younger to vote is going to make people …

    [read more]
    0
  • cam from Kentucky

    Voting rights are protected in the United States. It is stated in the constitution that everyone has the right to vote under certain circumstances. These circumstances make sense since they make sure one is old enough to understand issues in the country. Also one has to live and be a legal citizen in the United States which makes sense since voting is for the rights of the country and not any other. Everyone has access to voting rights if the circumstances are met. https://www.usa.gov/who-can-vote There are polls that are not as easily accessible to people compared to others, but nonetheless, are accessible. Voting polls have become more accessible to people with disabilities such as being handicapped, blind, etc. Even requirements have been made where people, who are unable to put where they live due to being homeless, can vote. https://www.findlaw.com/voting/my-voting-guide/the-homeless-vote–can-you-legally-cast-a-ballot-.html Although everyone is able to vote, only about 61% do end up voting. For many reasons, either they don’t have the time, they don’t care, or it’s just too difficult and not important enough for them to go the extra mile to vote. As a result, it seems as if voting rights aren’t protected when in reality the right to vote is just not as popularly practiced. http://www.electproject.org/home/voter-turnout/demographics

    [read less]

    Voting rights are protected in the United States. It is stated in the constitution that everyone has the right to vote under certain circumstances. Th…

    [read more]
    0
  • Derrick from Kentucky

    Yes, I believe that voting rights are sufficiently protected. The requirements to vote are fair and helpful during elections. Some of the requirements I’m talking about are:
    – 18 years of age
    – Drivers license
    – Citizen of the United States
    These requirements are entirely necessary and should not be changed. But I do believe that some of the restrictions such as people with felony convictions may or may not be able to vote in certain states should be changed. The reason I think this is because they are still human, especially if they’ve been rehabilitated and are showing progress with getting back into the norms of society.
    We have made much progress throughout the years with who can and cannot vote, each decision on what to change is always carefully thought of. And for that reason I believe that voting rights are sufficiently protected.

    [read less]

    Yes, I believe that voting rights are sufficiently protected. The requirements to vote are fair and helpful during elections. Some of the requirements…

    [read more]
    0
  • Justin from Kentucky

    Yes they are You have a lot of different opshouns that you can do. If you can not go in person than you can have a mail in ballot that you can do there is also early voting that you can do to. It is also easy to register to vote you don’t have to do much. You can even do it online. There are so many ways that you can vote now.

    [read less]

    Yes they are You have a lot of different opshouns that you can do. If you can not go in person than you can have a mail in ballot that you can do ther…

    [read more]
    0
  • Mackenzie from Kentucky

    Voting Rights are sufficiently protected by the United States Government. If they weren’t protected then we wouldn’t have a President right now. Our country has worked incredibly hard just to get the right to vote. Now, people are more aware of voting rights and how to vote. Some may say that there are obstacles making it unconstitutional, which makes me bring up the phrase that nothing is perfect. Everything has a flaw and not everyone is going to agree on one strategy. In the 2020 election, 159,633,396 people voted. That is 67% percent of the people eligible to vote (James Lindsay Blog Post on 12-15-20). While it is not everyone that should have voted, you can’t convince someone to vote or make them. That is what would be considered unconstitutional. Furthermore, you can’t base the 33% that didn’t vote on the fact that our voting rights aren’t protected. If they weren’t then all those people that did vote wouldn’t have been able to.

    [read less]

    Voting Rights are sufficiently protected by the United States Government. If they weren’t protected then we wouldn’t have a President right now. O…

    [read more]
    0
  • Zachariah from Kentucky

    Yes, I Feel as though voting rights are protected. We have many amendments in place to protect these rights. I think if we were to lower the age of voting it would open the opportunity for younger Americans to vote, but they could be biased from their parents or just not educated. Also at the age of 18, you become an adult which means you should be able to make your own political opinions.

    [read less]

    Yes, I Feel as though voting rights are protected. We have many amendments in place to protect these rights. I think if we were to lower the age of vo…

    [read more]
    0
  • Jayden from Kentucky

    Yes voting rights are sufficiently protected in the United States. There is not a singular law in the constitution or amendments that is inhibiting peoples voting rights. Most people don’t vote because they do not want to or they feel their vote doesn’t matter which is no fault of anyone but their own. They are just inhibiting their own voting rights by choosing not to go vote when they get off work or on their lunch break.

    [read less]

    Yes voting rights are sufficiently protected in the United States. There is not a singular law in the constitution or amendments that is inhibiting pe…

    [read more]
    0
  • Anna from North Carolina

    With election day coming up on Tuesday, November 2, 2021, the topic of voting in elections has come about many and has started a debate on whether or not voting rights are sufficiently protected in the United States. Voting rights in America are not in fact protected due to the corruption of votes casted and the lack of identification when voting in public. A change is strongly needed to be made in order to have a smoother and more fair election process for all.

    This year, the 2020 Election was going on while we were still currently in a global pandemic known as COVID-19. According to Zachary Scherer with the United States Census Bureau, “Majority of Voters Used Nontraditional Methods to Cast Ballots in 2020.” Scherer stated that due to COVID-19 a wide variety from state to state with how you could vote varied greatly. This variety gives an inconsistency throughout the election between the states and does not fairly protect the rights of voters. Anyone could have casted a vote from home or gone out to the polls early. Through this discrepancy we are clearly able to see that the voting rights are not in fact sufficiently protected and things need to be changed.

    The differences in rules and regulations for identification during elections throughout the country are given completely up to the state government officials and legislature. According to the National Conference of State Legislators, 16 states across the US require no documentation in order to vote while the other 34 states are assorted between requiring strict Photo IDs or strict non photo IDs. It can also be seen that some states just say some form of identification. This wide range of differences between the states leaves an unbalance in the people casting votes. For example, North Carolina legislature requires no documentation when casting your vote, anyone could vote even if they are not eligible for some unknown reason. If every state agreed with voting documentation and ID requirements the election process would be smoother, but due to the fact that it is not, voting rights are strongly not protected in the United States.

    [read less]

    With election day coming up on Tuesday, November 2, 2021, the topic of voting in elections has come about many and has started a debate on whether or …

    [read more]
    0
  • Kaila from North Carolina

    Voting rights are not sufficiently protected in the United States. While it is the right and duty for US citizens to vote, laws and acts are being passed as loopholes to reduce the number of voters. Nick Corasaniti and Reid J. Epstein’s article in New York Times, “What Georgia’s Voting Law Really Does,” provides an analysis of the voting law passed in Georgia. Georgia recently passed a voting law that created strict provisions that have brought, and will have, a significant impact on future elections. “Voters will now have less time to request absentee ballots. It’s now illegal for election officials to mail out absentee ballot applications to all voters. Mobile voting centers are essentially banned. Offering food or water to voters waiting in line now risks misdemeanor charges” (Corasaniti and Epstein). Those were some of the changes created by the passing of the law listed in the article. As stated in “The Constitution of the United States: A Transcription,” voting rights cannot be prohibited due to someone’s race, color, condition of servitude, sex, or age. While the law passed in Georgia doesn’t technically prohibit a person’s right to vote, it makes it harder, therefore, proving the US is not sufficiently protecting people’s voting rights.
    African Americans have been one of the most negatively affected groups when it comes to voting rights. This has been the case since the creation of the US government. Loopholes such as the voting law passed in Georgia to prevent voter turnout, especially from the black community, isn’t a new concept. In Senior Attorney Jennifer Rae Taylor’s article “Race, Voting, and a Gaping Loophole: A Critical Look at the 14th Amendment” the end of slavery, the Civil War and the passing of the “Civil Rights Amendments” were taken into account when looking at African Americans and their new rights such as voting. African Americans were not even granted the right to vote until the 15th Amendment was passed. However, acts of voter suppression were present at this time too. Tactics such as poll taxes, literacy tests, and grandfather clauses all took place in an attempt to reduce the black vote (Taylor). Poll taxes and literacy tests prevented African Americans from voting at the time due to the recent end of slavery which caused them to lack money and knowledge. Had their voting rights been protected, these laws and loopholes would not have been able to be present then or now.
    The US does not sufficiently protect the voting rights of all US citizens.

    “The Constitution of the United States: A Transcription.” National Archives and Records Administration, National Archives and Records Administration, https://www.archives.gov/founding-docs/constitution-transcript.
    Corasaniti, Nick, and Reid J. Epstein. “What Georgia’s Voting Law Really Does.” The New York Times, The New York Times, 2 Apr. 2021, https://www.nytimes.com/2021/04/02/us/politics/georgia-voting-law-annotated.html.
    Taylor, Jennifer Rae. “Race, Voting, and a Gaping Loophole: A Critical Look at the 14th Amendment.” Equal Justice Initiative, 14 Sept. 2020,

    [read less]

    Voting rights are not sufficiently protected in the United States. While it is the right and duty for US citizens to vote, laws and acts are being pas…

    [read more]
    0
  • Keller from North Carolina

    Voting rights in the United States are insufficiently protected as politicians are able to create voter restriction bills and keep outdated laws in place. Rights to vote have always been controversial in the US, but as congress looks to pass a monumental bill: The Freedom to Vote Act, we must look at what still needs to be fixed with the current system.
    Voting has always been instrumental in our nation’s government and is the key to democracy. Nowadays the key is not available to everyone in the same way. Just a few years ago, native american tribes in North Dakota could not vote simply because they did not have a street address (Ferguson-Bohnee). These are everyday Americans who have lost their right to vote over a technicality put in place to assure they could not vote. Through this it can be seen that even if most people’s right to vote is protected, it is still too easy for politicians to strip these rights. According to ACLU, over the past few years over 400 bills have been created across 48 states. To see this is to see how a nation founded on the principles of a government for the people, fails to live up to its billing everyday. Right now in Texas a bill is being queued up for the governor to sign that will consist of a ban on drive-thru voting, new regulations for early voting hours: including a ban on 24-hour voting, a ban on the distribution of mail-in ballot applications, new ID requirements for voting by mail, A correction process for mail-in voting, enhancing poll watcher protections, establishing monthly citizenship checks, creating new rules for voter assistance (Ura). It seems wrong that people in the country can know that these things are going on and still believe that voting rights are being protected. Some would argue that these are all enhancing protections to vote, but this is the epitome of trying to fix something that is not broken. Cyber fraud has occurred in the past but these are not targeting that, these are butthurt politicians attempting to make it easier for their political party to win elections, regardless of the effects on the integrity of their office.
    Along with the ordeals of having new laws trying to be passed, there are still outdated laws in place that keep citizens from voting. A large problem with voting now is the little flexibility that comes with it besides election day and the short period of early voting. Another problem is that at polling spots lines become atrociously long making it difficult for some citizens to cast their vote. As these problems continue to make a difference in elections we cannot say that every voter has protected rights.
    Voting rights have become a game that politicians try and maneuver to make it easier for their side to win. Politics should not be a game, every citizen should get to cast a vote and the side with more votes should win. This sounds way simpler than it actually is, but until our system becomes close to this, we are not a nation with protected voting rights.

    [read less]

    Voting rights in the United States are insufficiently protected as politicians are able to create voter restriction bills and keep outdated laws in pl…

    [read more]
    0
  • Ives from North Carolina

    Voting is the greatest democratic right and responsibility given to citizens of the United States. It is the way we can represent who we feel is the best, most qualified individual to lead our country, state, and local governments. States determine their own voter laws and not the United States. This means that states can differ on the types of laws in place for the right to vote given to citizens. In all states, every citizen has the right to vote, but it may be tougher for some citizens to be able to vote than others. I believe that voting rights are protected, but the voting system now makes it hard for certain citizens to activate one of the most basic rights given to us. Voting regulations should be changed in certain states because it does not allow people the time to vote, and voting lines are too long.
    The voting system we have today does not give voters time to go vote. Most citizens that vote are coming from some sort of profession that will not allow them to go to the polls anytime of the day. Most polling locations are open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., which does now allow flexibility for many of those working during the day. The opportunity to vote is very challenging due to these limited time constraints on much of the American workforce. An individual with an average job would only be allowed maybe 2 hours due to working, commuting and other daily responsibilities in day-to-day life. In larger cities, where the populations are high, significant numbers of people may come to these polling places on the time they are off work. Also, the limited time frame is challenging for low-income citizens. In 2016, it is estimated that only 46 percent of the low-income citizens actually voted in the Presidential election (MATT). This could be the case because these people are focused on other responsibilities, in this limited time frame. More affluent individuals may have flexibility, education, and more opportunities allowing them access and time to vote. Other options rather than limited time on a certain day a year will allow options for others to have the same opportunity to vote.
    The voting lines at the polls are too long. A long poll line can also cause challenges, as so many citizens do not have time in the day. In a study done to test the wait times on voting day, it was determined that the voting average wait time in the 2016 election was 2 hours and 35 minutes. This was in Maricopa County which is where the county where the city of Phoenix is located. It was also found that polls that were supposed to close at 7 p.m. and ended up closing around midnight. If someone is a working citizen and just getting off your job many would not be motivated to vote knowing there may be a 2 and a half wait time. Also, in the same county there were 200 polling locations in 2012 but then only 60 polling locations in 2016. There were fewer locations which made voting polls more crowded and harder to be able to vote. Furthermore, in the Phoenix area there is a large Latino population and voting turnout in Phoenix for Latinos was down tremendously compared to 2012. Then when determining the locations of the polls that were open in 2012 and not in 2016, it was found that those with a high concentration of the Latino population were the ones not opened in 2016. This shows how a new system needs to be put In place for voting because a wait time of 2 hours to vote is not equitable. (Christopher)
    All citizens should have the opportunity to vote in the elections, but reasons like long voter lines and not providing enough time for all citizens to go to the polls to vote make it hard for people to make their voices heard. Of course, some may not want to vote, but if these challenges were addressed throughout the country, I believe that the voter turnout would increase tremendously. Last year in 2020 was a record high voter turnout, and it was still only about 67% (Jacob). This means that there are around 110 million people in the United States that did not vote. Our elections are supposed to determine the leader by the citizens. How can we determine who the people prefer if only one third of the population does not even have an equal chance to have their voices heard.

    FABINA, JACOB. “Despite Pandemic Challenges, 2020 Election Had Largest Increase in Voting between Presidential Elections on Record.” Census.gov, US Census Bureau , 8 Oct. 2021, https://www.census.gov/library/stories/2021/04/record-high-turnout-in-2020-general-election.html.
    Famighetti, Christopher. “Foreword by Erika Wood – Brennan Center.” https://Www.brennancenter.org/Sites/Default/Files/Analysis/Long_Voting_Lines_Explained.Pdf, Brennana Center For Justice, https://www.brennancenter.org/sites/default/files/legacy/Democracy/CitizensGuidetoRedistricting_2010.pdf.
    Stevens, Matt. “Poorer Americans Have Much Lower Voting Rates in National Elections than the Nonpoor, a Study Finds.” The New York Times, The New York Times, 11 Aug. 2020, https://www.nytimes.com/2020/08/11/us/politics/poorer-americans-have-much-lower-voting-rates-in-national-elections-than-the-nonpoor-a-study-finds.html.

    [read less]

    Voting is the greatest democratic right and responsibility given to citizens of the United States. It is the way we can represent who we feel is the b…

    [read more]
    0
  • dakota from North Carolina

    TTV: Voting Rights Protection

    I do not think that voting rights are sufficiently protected in the United States. Though mail-in ballots were a seemingly perfect way to provide easy access voting to those who can’t reach the polls, corruption and laws have made it harder for some to vote from home. Furthermore, felons and people without postal access or access to a voting center are much less able to vote. This indicates that people in low income communities and people convicted of felonies often feel like they don’t have a voice in our democratic nation.
    People in low income communities often work many days a week to provide for their families. In states that do not require a day off from work to vote or people that don’t have the ability to take off work to vote are therefore often unable to send in their ballots. In the United States, many low income communities are predominantly occupied by people of color and there is large speculation that states do not enforce a day off from work to inhibit people of color from voting. According to The Guardian, people in line to vote at the polls in Georgia could stand and wait up to 10 hours to cast their vote and the state of Georgia bans poll centers from providing food and water to those waiting.(Aftergut, 22 September, 2021) This greatly inhibits people who depend on long work hours to support their families from going to polls to vote.
    Similarly, anyone in the United States that has been convicted of a felony is physically unable to vote. The Guardian mentions a man that has been unable to vote since he was 18, as he was convicted for selling marijuana, a drug that is now legally administered in many states. It also references the new Freedom to Vote Act, which “rivals the 1965 Voting Rights Act”, and would allow “ballot access in federal elections for citizens who were once imprisoned”.(Aftergut, 22 September, 2021) It is widely known that African Americans are among the most incarcerated individuals of any other race in the United States. Current voting laws are prohibiting a large percentage of the African American population from voting. Many speculate that this is the intention of these current laws, as “more than one in seven African Americans are without a right to vote” in Florida, Kentucky, Mississippi, Tennessee, Virginia, Alabama, and Wyoming, with most of these being typically Republican voting states.(Aftergut, 22 September, 2021)

    Works Cited:

    Aftergut, Dennis. “Congress Has a Massive Voting Rights Bill in Its Grasp. It Must Pass It, Now | Dennis Aftergut.” The Guardian, Guardian News and Media, 22 Sept. 2021, http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2021/sep/22/congress-must-pass-voting-rights-bill.

    [read less]

    TTV: Voting Rights Protection

    I do not think that voting rights are sufficiently protected in the United States. Though mail-in ballots were a see…

    [read more]
    0
  • Averi from North Carolina

    The right to vote is a precious thing that all Americans are rewarded with and this right should be protected at all costs. Many Citizens in other countries are not given this right so we as Americans should make sure that every single vote is counted and done so honestly. “America is strongest when our democratic institutions are strong, and when they reflect and project the confidence of our people” (Colin Allred). Voting rights are not protected because not everyone is able to vote who is eligible and people have to work on election day.

    To vote in North Carolina you are required to be at least 18 years of age, register to vote at least 30 days before an election, and have a photo ID, (Ballotpedia). What about people who have disabilities and don’t have a photo ID because they aren’t able to go get one in person, do they just not have a voice because they don’t have an ID? Photo ID used to not be a requirement to vote but since 2016 it has been,(VoteNC). 21 million Americans who are of voting age do not have any sort of ID. This law also discriminates against minority voters because 25% of African Americans of voting age don’t have IDs compared to only 8% for white people. State ID and driver’s licenses have to be paid for in order to obtain them and yes there are some alternative options for people who are homeless but it is a long difficult process to go through that I believe is not necessary to vote. All of these strict voter ID laws make it difficult for many people to vote who should have the right to voice their opinion no matter what.

    Election day is not a national holiday and most Americans are working, if their job doesn’t allow them to leave work to go vote, they just aren’t able to have a say in the election. In North Carolina, the polls are open from 6:30 am to 7:30 pm. Most people are working during these hours and have a family or children to take care of before or after. A 2017 Pew study showed that 16% of registered voters did not make it out to vote because they were too busy or the times the polls were open were inconvenient. If election day was made a holiday and no one had to work, people could find a time that worked best for them and be able to make it to the polls to vote. Also if it were a national holiday it would serve as a reminder to people of the importance of voting. Nothing should hold anyone back from being able to vote, especially someone’s job because that is something that is necessary that people have to do.

    Just these two laws alone are hindering tons of Americans from going out and voting who should definitely be able to voice their opinion. I understand that these laws were put in place to ensure fairness and honesty in elections but there need to be some big changes so that everyone can go out and vote.

    Columbia Daily Tribune. “Should Election Day Be a National Holiday?” Columbia Daily Tribune, Columbia Daily Tribune, 23 Oct. 2020, https://www.columbiatribune.com/story/opinion/columns/2020/10/23/should-election-day-national-holiday/3744234001/.
    “Congress Has a Massive Voting Rights Bill in Its Grasp. It Must Pass It, Now | Dennis Aftergut.” The Guardian, Guardian News and Media, 22 Sept. 2021, https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2021/sep/22/congress-must-pass-voting-rights-bill.
    Diaz, Daniella. “House Democrats Urge Senate Colleagues to Pass Voting Rights Bill This Week.” CNN, Cable News Network, 18 Oct. 2021, https://www.cnn.com/2021/10/18/politics/house-democrats-voting-rights-bill-senate/index.html.
    “Oppose Voter ID Legislation – Fact Sheet.” American Civil Liberties Union, https://www.aclu.org/other/oppose-voter-id-legislation-fact-sheet.
    “Voting in North Carolina.” Ballotpedia, https://ballotpedia.org/Voting_in_North_Carolina.
    Williamson, Kevin D. “Why Not Fewer Voters?” National Review, National Review, 7 Apr. 2021, https://www.nationalreview.com/2021/04/why-not-fewer-voters/.

    [read less]

    The right to vote is a precious thing that all Americans are rewarded with and this right should be protected at all costs. Many Citizens in other cou…

    [read more]
    0
  • Anna from North Carolina

    I do not think voting rights are adequately protected. When thinking about the rights we receive as American citizens, one of the first that comes to mind is the right to vote. It is often seen as a milestone to a new 18 year old as it’s one of the next steps to full adulthood. However, what may be shocking to some people is that there is nothing in the Constitution that guarantees citizens the right to vote. (Democracyjourn) In fact, losing the right to vote has been used as a punishment for convicted criminals. (Uggen and Nellis) While Americans aren’t necessarily guaranteed the right to vote, they also have to be worried about voter fraud and extremists from either side trying to convince others of voter fraud. This was extremely evident during the 2020 election and caused a lot of turmoil and confusion resulting in a not so peaceful transition of power. With the use of mail in ballots there is a greater chance of voter fraud as it’s harder to track, creating distrust surrounding voting which has the potential to decrease voter turnout. As a result of a decreased voter turnout, the true opinion of the people could possibly not be taken into account. The right to vote leads us to our other freedoms. By electing a reliable representative into office, we can relay our opinions about education, Covid-19, reducing poverty, and the living wage. By having the right to vote and having that right be protected, we open a whole new world of possibilities of a brighter future, one that we have a say about. Voting rights in the US are not adequately protected as the right to vote isn’t even talked about in the Constitution, the right to vote can be taken away from select citizens, and voter fraud continues to increase.

    Democracyjourn. “The Missing Right: A Constitutional Right to Vote.” Democracy Journal, 15 Dec. 2015, democracyjournal.org/magazine/28/the-missing-right-a-constitutional-right-to-vote/.
    “Congress Has a Massive Voting Rights Bill in Its Grasp. It Must Pass It, Now | Dennis Aftergut.” The Guardian, Guardian News and Media, 22 Sept. 2021, http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2021/sep/22/congress-must-pass-voting-rights-bill.
    Uggen, Chris, and Ashley Nellis. “Locked out 2020: Estimates of People Denied Voting Rights Due to a Felony Conviction.” The Sentencing Project, 13 Aug. 2021, http://www.sentencingproject.org/publications/locked-out-2020-estimates-of-people-denied-voting-rights-due-to-a-felony-conviction/.

    [read less]

    I do not think voting rights are adequately protected. When thinking about the rights we receive as American citizens, one of the first that comes to …

    [read more]
    0
  • Amelia from North Carolina

    Today many people seem to question if voting rights are sufficiently protected in the United States. Some people state voting rights are sufficiently protected due to the US already providing laws that protect voting rights Constitution. While this is true there are still many loopholes and revisions that need. Voting rights are not sufficiently protected due to the barriers voters have to face in elections to make sure their vote is counted and due to to the many actions made by Congress on passing bills to reform new voting rights.

    The controversial topic of if voting rights are sufficiently protected in the United States is becoming more common among citizens. Many Americans feel their voting rights and their fellow citizens voting rights are slowly being taken away from them. A survey done on American citizens showed that 58% percent of people are concerned about adequate accessibility to voting (Dann, 2021). This fear is also rising in certain groups of Americans that fear their voting rights are being limited due to their race or ethnic background. This is seen in states like Georgia who in 2017 created its exact match law which was that the “voter’s name should exactly match their approved name of identification” the result of this law blocked 80% of people of color’s votes (Johnson,2020). Different ethnic communities have reported increased concerns with limited voting rights. Carie Dann a political editor for NBC News reported that 73 percent of Hispanic Americans have concerns with “making sure all eligible voters have the right to vote”. The growing distrust of American citizens about voter protection shows why voters feel their rights are being limited.

    Many American citizens have stated they think their voting rights are not being protected enough and their argument strengthens as Congress agrees. Many members of Congress from the Senate and House of Representatives are trying to make new bills and acts to reform voting in America. One of these acts includes The John Lewis Voting Act that was passed by the House on August 24, 2021 ( Human Rights campaign). This act is supposed to strengthen voting rights by making sure any issues or changes that are going to occur in the election are heard and told to the people 180 days, it also allows federal workers to more frequently come and observe elections (Human Rights campaign). This shows the House believes voting rights need to be more strictly reformed to secure voting rights. But the House is not the only one pushing for voting rights to be reformed, the Senate is also trying to push for voting rights bills. One of these bills includes The Freedom to Vote Act that is supposed to limit voter suppression for the disabled and allow voters to sue when they feel their “constitutional right is infringed upon” (Weiser,2021). This shows that both the House of Reps. and the Senate is trying to reform voting laws in America because they believe they are unfit to sufficiently protect voters.

    [read less]

    Today many people seem to question if voting rights are sufficiently protected in the United States. Some people state voting rights are sufficiently …

    [read more]
    0
  • Daniel from North Carolina

    Over the course of the many months preceding, a fiery debate over the nature of voting rights has been heavily disputed throughout the United States. Voting has always been one of the greatest freedoms that the United States has been able to proudly boast during its reign as the beacon of hope for many around the world, and an attack on voter rights is no small matter. While many argue that no restrictive measures are set in place that block citizens from voting, many others argue that recent state legislatures have been able to pass laws that prohibit citizens from being able to submit their votes at the ballot box. While many may argue otherwise, voting rights are being suppressed due to stricter and unnecessary regulations being set in place by state legislatures, as well as the targeted repression of voters in specific demographics.
    As elections have come and gone, many states have found more and more ways to implement harsher and unneeded restrictions to prevent voting from occurring. In a CNN article written by reporter Daniella Diaz, well over a dozen states have been able to pass a total of thirty-three laws that have made voting more and more difficult to accomplish in the last year alone (Diaz, 2021). While at first glance this may not seem to be very harsh, the nature of these restrictions proves otherwise. For instance, legislatures successfully passed a law in Kansas in 2011 that required citizens in the state to show proof of citizenship, which prevented over 30,000 Kansans from being able to register to vote. This horrific instance of voter suppression, along with many others, highlights the unnecessary restrictions being placed on our citizens that limits their basic freedom of voting as an American.
    Although constitutional amendments have made voting, in theory, an accessible right to all citizens, many government officials have found ways of bypassing these amendments. According to journalist Sarina Vij for the American Bar Association, “Voter ID laws have underlying racial biases and prevent minorities from engaging in active democratic participation (Vij, 2020).” While not completely restricted from minorities, laws have made it much more difficult for demographic groups such as African Americans and Hispanics to be able to obtain their voter IDs. In turn, this leads to reduced voter turnout from these respective groups. According to the ACLU, areas in which minorities had a larger presence in the general population were found to have fewer polling stations, as well as a lower ratio of polling workers to voters (ACLU, 2021). Factors such as these limit the ability of minorities to freely participate in American politics and limit their ability to voice their opinions through the ballot box, which in turn limits the democracy that this nation cherishes.
    Thus, although many may claim that voting rights are sufficiently protected, this is simply not the case due to harsh and unnecessary restrictions, as well as racial biases that clamp down on the voices of our minority groups.

    [read less]

    Over the course of the many months preceding, a fiery debate over the nature of voting rights has been heavily disputed throughout the United States. …

    [read more]
    0
  • perry from North Carolina

    Voting, also known as suffrage, is the right to stand for election. It has been debated most recently, primarily due to the ongoing pandemic, if the voting rights of American citizens are protected. In Article 1, Section 8 of the Constitution, it is stated that federalism is, “the division and sharing of power between the national and state governments.” The ultimate result of federalism is that states get certain enumerated powers that allow the leaders of each state legislature to decide how they will enforce certain policies. In the United States today, only 35 of the 50 states require valid voter identification, which can ultimately lead to corrupt voting results due to the various loopholes, overall affecting the outcome of an election. Voting rights are ultimately not protected in the United States due to the fact that voting restrictions vary from state to state, which can negatively affect the outcome of an election, leading to a decline in the overall quality of American democracy.
    Voting rights are mainly not protected throughout the United States due to the varying restrictions from state to state. Terrance Adams, an Associate Analyst for voting rights, found that only 33 of the 50 states in America have early voting, where “a voter appears in person to cast his or her ballot before Election Day.” (Adams) It was also discovered that 27 of the 50 states have “no excuse absentee voting” which is “when a voter applies for and receives a ballot to submit by mail without providing a reason for being absent from his or her polling place on Election Day.” This allows for voting fraud due to the fact that the government does not have strict ties with these voters because they do not ask for a particular reason why the voter is sending in a ballot, which can limit democracy and the structure of voting in America.
    It is viewed by a majority of American citizens that voting rights are protected due to mail in ballots and voter identification requirements, but because of the “400 anti-voter bills” that have “been introduced in 48 states”, unnecessary barriers are established that limit the rights of voters, which ultimately weakens American democracy because it does not accurately reflect the will of the people.” (ACLU) Since many states allow mail in ballots to be cast without providing a reason for not voting in person, it allows for potential voter fraud, such as more than one ballot being cast, which provides numbers that do not reflect the overall population. It has recently been debated on whether or not the 2020 presidential election was false in its casting numbers, but there is no definite proof to support this claim. If there was a federal policy centered around securing the rights of voters instead of allowing states to enforce voting policies, then there would be a lot less debate on voter fraud and false voting numbers, which would lead to the voting protection of American citizens.

    Citations
    United States Constitution. Art 1, Sec. 8
    Wendy Underhill, Ben Williams. “Voter Identification Requirements: Voter ID Laws.” Voter Identification Requirements | Voter ID Laws, https://www.ncsl.org/research/elections-and-campaigns/voter-id.aspx.
    “ACLU News & Commentary.” American Civil Liberties Union, https://www.aclu.org/news/civil-liberties/block-the-vote-voter-suppression-in-2020/.
    Terrance Adams, Associate Analyst. States with Early Voting or No-Excuse Absentee Voting, https://www.cga.ct.gov/2014/rpt/2014-R-0250.htm.

    [read less]

    Voting, also known as suffrage, is the right to stand for election. It has been debated most recently, primarily due to the ongoing pandemic, if the v…

    [read more]
    0
  • Riley from North Carolina

    As a democracy, the United States government is run by the people. Elections are supposed to represent the voice of the majority, creating a system where elected officials speak for the people. However, voting rights are not sufficiently protected in the United States. Difficulty with registration and laws that make voting a stressful process have deterred citizens from voting, and issues with mail in ballots, voting accessibility, and the purging of voters, has shown that actions need to be taken to protect voters rights.
    While voting is considered a citizen’s right and responsibility, a group of House democrats has been urging the senate to pass an act that would make voting easier and a more secure process. “Nineteen states have passed 33 news laws this year that make it harder to vote, according to a recent analysis from the liberal Brennan Center for Justice” says Daniella Diaz from CNN. Many of these laws are targeted towards mail-in ballots, with restrictions placed on receiving the ballot, the time frame to get the ballot in, and limitations on who can receive assistance in turning their ballot in. These limitations make it difficult for citizens who have a disability and are not as mobile, as well as the elderly and sick. Laws have also been placed on in-person voting, with restrictions placed on voter ID, and availability of polling places, as well as the registration window being shortened and voter roll purges becoming more likely. With more restrictive bills making their way through the House and Senate, steps have to be taken to ensure voter rights. The bill the aforementioned House democrats are supporting will “make it easier to register to vote, make Election Day a public holiday, ensure states have early voting for federal elections and allow all voters to request mail-in ballots.” This bill would protect the rights of American citizens, making sure that as many people as possible will vote.
    States have found other ways to limit votes, such as purging voters for small mistakes on forms. “In Georgia, the Secretary of State attempted to purge voters from the rolls simply because their name did not exactly match other governmental records.” says Terry Ao Minnis and Niyati Shah from the American Bar association. Minnis and Shah go on to explain how ethnic names do not fit into the same format as traditionally American names, which means that their ballot could be thrown out. This issue, which disproportionately affects minorities, is indicative of voter rights of all Americans not being protected.
    Due to these threats to equal representation, voting rights are not sufficiently protected in the United states.

    [read less]

    As a democracy, the United States government is run by the people. Elections are supposed to represent the voice of the majority, creating a system wh…

    [read more]
    0
  • Maleah from North Carolina

    Voting rights in the United states are not sufficiently protected in the United States. Disregarding the fact that you have to be over the age of 18, a registered voter and a citizen, recent laws has been passed in many states that can make it harder to vote for Americans, especially people of color.
    According to the Brennan center for justice, 19 states have passed laws thatll make it harder for Americans to vote. More than 400 bills have been introdcuded in 49 states that restrict voting access in the 2021 legislative sessions. It makes early and mail-in voting harder, and make requirements for voting id harsh. It doesent reassure people of the fears and anxiety they might possibly have of voting and surely doesent make it seem like America is a safe place to vote, especially for people of color, or those with disabilities. We need to make sure that the people born after us wont have to work so hard to make sure their voting rights are protected and laws that are made to protect this are enforced as much as possible. The US News states that “The Supreme Court issued a new ruling that upheld two Arizona laws restricting organizations’ ability to collect mail-in ballots”. Despite many new laws being pushed to help protect voting rights, there are more laws in many states thatll make voting more a burden than something they should be proud of, and can make them simply not want to vote. Many of those laws include some discrimination and can contrdaict the Voting right sact of 1965. These laws can be harmful in the future, and can create a voting environment that wont be suitable for the next generations. The rights of voters are important and it doesent seem like America is taking a stand to show that they are. THese recent new laws demonstrate how they are more concerned over a certain demographics vote than the american people as a whole. Even though more states are passing new laws to make voting access easier and to protect the rights of voters, these types of laws will make citizens of certain states not want to vote, and they will take advantage of this and itll end up snowballing into something way worse. Americans should be proud of their voting rights, no matter how much they are trying to take it away from people.

    [read less]

    Voting rights in the United states are not sufficiently protected in the United States. Disregarding the fact that you have to be over the age of 18,…

    [read more]
    0
  • Hannah from North Carolina

    I do not think that voting rights are sufficiently protected in the United States. There has been lots of corruption with voting ballots in the past elections, especially in the 2020 election. The mail in ballots have recently become a popular way to vote among many citizens. Although they seem like a good idea to most people because it’s an easy alternative to waiting in line, there has been lots of corruption coming from them. Many ballots that were mailed in during the 2020 election weren’t accounted for and ballots were received from dead people. (Brennan Center For Justice) Many ballots were also changed last year. Some people were even able to mail in more than one ballot. How are we supposed to have security in our voting when people are changing the ballots once they are mailed in? We simply can’t. Our votes aren’t even being accounted for when we mail them in, but somehow we’re supposed to view this as a good option for voting. From this many states have put more restrictions on voting, which is highly unfair for the American voters when they weren’t even the ones changing the votes in the first place. Over eighteen states have made new laws just this year that will make it harder for people to vote. (Latner, Schroedel, 2021) They have not only placed restrictions on mail voting, but also in person voting. (Brennan Center For Justice, 2021) This is an injustice to the American people and we will not stand for this. There have been six laws placed against the time frame voters will have to mail in ballots and five laws making it hard for people to receive their mail in ballots along with many more laws that make it more complicated for the average American citizen to vote. ( Brennan Center For Justice, 2021) Many of our rights are simply just being taken away from us. There is almost no protection in our voting rights which we saw even more clearly as of last year.

    ABOUT THE AUTHOR(S)Michael Latner is a professor of political science at California Polytechnic State University, M. L., Michael Latner is a professor of political science at California Polytechnic State University, Recent Articles by Michael LatnerElectoral Engineering and the Freedom to VoteA Political Scientist’s Guide to Following the ElectionThe Science of Elections, J. S., Latner, R. A. by M., & Jean Schroedel is a professor emerita of political science at the Claremont Graduate University. (2021, September 28). We must fight restrictions on voting rights. We Must Fight Restrictions on Voting Rights – Scientific American. Retrieved October 31, 2021, from https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/we-must-fight-restrictions-on-voting-rights/?amp=true.

    Berry, P., Fowler, G., Ayers, P. D., Waldman, M., Weiser, W. R., & Dennie, M. (2021, May 28). Voting laws roundup: May 2021. Brennan Center for Justice. Retrieved October 31, 2021, from https://www.brennancenter.org/our-work/research-reports/voting-laws-roundup-may-2021.

    [read less]

    I do not think that voting rights are sufficiently protected in the United States. There has been lots of corruption with voting ballots in the past e…

    [read more]
    0
  • Laney from Missouri

    I do not think that voting rights are sufficiently protected they are limiting how people can vote for those who work they can not get to the voting lines in time so they should extend the time people have to vote for and make the hours longer so people can get off work and be able to put in there vote if they can’t do that then the rights of the voters are severely under-protected

    [read less]

    I do not think that voting rights are sufficiently protected they are limiting how people can vote for those who work they can not get to the voting l…

    [read more]
    0
  • Thor from Missouri

    Many states have passed laws that make voting more difficult. Whether its cutting out places to vote near areas with large amounts of black people, or trying to limit mail in voting over so called fraud that turned out to not be in issue when checked a multitude of times this last election. Voting should be made as easy as possible for those who are legally allowed to vote, while being short of abusable or easy to commit fraud. The laws being passed limiting systems that have been proved to work are only causing the voting system as a whole to regress.

    [read less]

    Many states have passed laws that make voting more difficult. Whether its cutting out places to vote near areas with large amounts of black people, or…

    [read more]
    0
  • Zack from Missouri

    Are voting rights are not protected enough. There are a lot of people who don’t even get to vote because they can’t get off work. The government offers mail in voting but that is not the most reliable. Mail is easily lost and could even be miscounted. Mail in votes are always going to cause controversy like this past election.

    [read less]

    Are voting rights are not protected enough. There are a lot of people who don’t even get to vote because they can’t get off work. The government offer…

    [read more]
    0
  • Hayden from Missouri

    Some states have different laws and some people may not have enough time to go and vote because they may be very very busy or have work. Some people mail votes in but some of them don’t get to the right people or places and they can get lost and in other mail and then their votes won’t count which can end up going a long way.

    [read less]

    Some states have different laws and some people may not have enough time to go and vote because they may be very very busy or have work. Some people m…

    [read more]
    0
  • Brady from Virginia

    All across the United States, voting rights have been being taken away day by day. Each week we hear about a new state that taking away rights for most communities of minority.

    0
  • Paige from Missouri

    i vote no the are not protected enough. people who mail there votes in are not protected at all. All the miss counted ballots in 2020 plays a huge part in it. someone can send more then one ballot in over the mail. some people cant get off work to go vote makes more people mail them in. If you work the day the polls open you should be able to get some time off to go vote. i think that that would majorly improve them being more protected. People who lived in a state and then moved to a different state are getting ballots mailed to them form the state they use to live in. which is wrong and should not be allowed to happen for one its not the state they live in anymore and for two they could vote totally different.

    [read less]

    i vote no the are not protected enough. people who mail there votes in are not protected at all. All the miss counted ballots in 2020 plays a huge p…

    [read more]
    0
  • Gray from Minnesota

    I think no, because many jobs do not give their employees time off to go vote. This makes voting harder for people who rely on their jobs. It makes it hard for them to find time outside of work and their many responsibilities.

    [read less]

    I think no, because many jobs do not give their employees time off to go vote. This makes voting harder for people who rely on their jobs. It makes it…

    [read more]
    0
  • Dallas from Missouri

    Our voting rights are not sufficiently protected. Although mail in voting might be more convenient for people, it can often lead to a corruption in the voting system. States have made laws that make voting more difficult for some citizens. Many citizens of the United States work long hours and are unable to take off work to vote. Every citizen should be able to vote for every election. It’s their right as a citizen of the United States.

    [read less]

    Our voting rights are not sufficiently protected. Although mail in voting might be more convenient for people, it can often lead to a corruption in th…

    [read more]
    0
  • Maggie from Missouri

    Many different states have made new laws making it harder for people to vote. Some states don’t even give employees enough time off work that day to go vote, making it harder for them to make the time. Some might say that mail-in ballots are a good option, but I don’t think so because mail gets lost all the time, who knows if it’s going to be your vote that gets lost next.

    [read less]

    Many different states have made new laws making it harder for people to vote. Some states don’t even give employees enough time off work that day to g…

    [read more]
    0
  • Isaac from Indiana

    I would argue this because states such as Indiana, Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont along with many others do not give their eomployees time off to go and vote to leave a large number of people to have difficulty finding time off and some cannot in general.

    [read less]

    I would argue this because states such as Indiana, Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont along with many others do not give their eomployees time off to g…

    [read more]
    0
  • Grace from Indiana

    I believe that the voting rights are not protected, the votes are not protected especially if we are now mailing them. This is a good example by showing what happened with our last election.

    [read less]

    I believe that the voting rights are not protected, the votes are not protected especially if we are now mailing them. This is a good example by showi…

    [read more]
    0
  • Alexander from Indiana

    No, voting rights are far from protected. In the 2020 election there were MANY MANY votes not counted and many fradulant votes that were counted

    0
  • aiden from Missouri

    i believe that are voting is not protected because what if someone is disabled or is 18 or older and doesn’t have an id they can not vote and the millions of votes that where not even people or us solders in afghan didn’t get to vote or if someone cant speak english they cant vote either but there us citizen so we need to protect are votes and get a law about it

    [read less]

    i believe that are voting is not protected because what if someone is disabled or is 18 or older and doesn’t have an id they can not vote and the mill…

    [read more]
    0
  • Olivia from Virginia

    No, I do not think voting rights are sufficiently protected in the United States. While there are no official laws that allow direct voter suppression, many states use tactics that weaken voters’ influence and their ability to vote reliably and fairly. Mail-in voting was largely ignored until the 2020 election due to the pandemic, but there were several issues with getting votes properly counted promptly due to its lack of maintenance. Following the 2020 election, many states quickly created legislation designed to make voting more difficult, especially for minority groups. Restrictions on where, when, and how people could vote directly oppressed communities in response to their record voting turnout. A lack of an official voting holiday can also make it so potential voters cannot get to the polls as they cannot leave their work, and the previously mentioned mail-in voting is an underused option many citizens do not know much about. In some communities, voting lines could additionally take hours to get through due to a lack of efficient voting processes. While some citizens can vote without issue, the power of their vote can be manipulated. Gerrymandering designs districts to favor certain parties, which intentionally weaken the voting power of the other group. This could be considered an aspect of voting rights as the right to a fair count of the vote.

    [read less]

    No, I do not think voting rights are sufficiently protected in the United States. While there are no official laws that allow direct voter suppression…

    [read more]
    0
  • Alayna from Missouri

    No, I do not think our voting rights are protected. I think mail-in ballots and absentee voting has impacted the credibility of the voting system. People that cannot afford to miss work or are not allowed to leave may not be able to get out before the polls close and they will miss their chance to vote.

    [read less]

    No, I do not think our voting rights are protected. I think mail-in ballots and absentee voting has impacted the credibility of the voting system. Peo…

    [read more]
    0
  • Joe from Maryland

    ARE VOTING RIGHTS SUFFICIENTLY PROtected in the us. I dont believe that Voting rights are protected due to many miscounted ballots in the 2020 election. The people who cannot vote or are not able to vote, they should not still be included in the voting system if they are deceased or cannot get up and get out of their house to go vote. Also Voting should not be mail ballots due to the cause of losing votes,

    [read less]

    ARE VOTING RIGHTS SUFFICIENTLY PROtected in the us. I dont believe that Voting rights are protected due to many miscounted ballots in the 2020 electio…

    [read more]
    0
  • Justin from Indiana

    I believe voting rights are not protected, there is not a dedicated voting day that allows everyone who wants to vote a chance to. The legitimacy of mail-in votes are at risk as well, some votes might not get accounted for while other votes are counted twice. People are also limited to location, smaller cities and towns have less places to votes.

    [read less]

    I believe voting rights are not protected, there is not a dedicated voting day that allows everyone who wants to vote a chance to. The legitimacy of m…

    [read more]
    0
  • Harley from Indiana

    Voting rights in the US is not protected in the United States. By not making voting day a national holiday, people that always work can’t stand in line all day and miss work. Also the locations of the poll machines haven’t been very fair before. They would put one or two machines in an urban location then put 10 + somewhere more rural.

    [read less]

    Voting rights in the US is not protected in the United States. By not making voting day a national holiday, people that always work can’t stand in lin…

    [read more]
    0
  • Brady from Indiana

    Voting in the US is rigged and not how it used to be. Now with mail in ballots, it can throw off a lot of the voting of people printing more than one copy or filling out more than one ballot. Mail in ballots should be taken away, since it has rigged the election of last year. It is not fair to have people not come in to vote, but mail it in where a lot of things can go wrong.

    [read less]

    Voting in the US is rigged and not how it used to be. Now with mail in ballots, it can throw off a lot of the voting of people printing more than one …

    [read more]
    0
  • Emily from Kentucky

    Voting rights in the US are not sufficiently protected. Taking away holidays to vote prevents the working class from submitting their vote. Most polls are open 12 hours, but if a person happens to be working a 12 hour shift, they cannot possibly vote. Muh of the working class tend to vote Republican, so removing voting holidays would give the Democrats an unfair advantage. Additionally, felons should have the right to vote despite their past mistakes. As long as they are still citizens of the United States, it is unconstitutional to take away their vote. The right to vote falls under inalienable rights. Just because someone slipped up doesn’t mean the government can completely control their life moving forward. Many felons turn away from their previous lifestyles and improve themselves. Why should they be excluded from elections? All in all, voting rights are not protected for all people. Removing holidays to vote excludes the working class. Additionally, excluding felons from voting infringes on a fraction of the US population’s rights.

    [read less]

    Voting rights in the US are not sufficiently protected. Taking away holidays to vote prevents the working class from submitting their vote. Most polls…

    [read more]
    0
  • Danny from Kentucky

    I think voting rights aren’t protected. If it’s a voting day people should have the right to get off of work. In the constitution everyone has the right to vote but what good does it do if you don’t have the time to go there. So if you do, get the day off of work to vote then I’d say yes, but, if you don’t then I find it unfair.

    [read less]

    I think voting rights aren’t protected. If it’s a voting day people should have the right to get off of work. In the constitution everyone has the…

    [read more]
    0
  • Ariana from California

    We must ensure our laws of fair voting rights and registration be updated to our digital world, while we continue to address the past with discrimination of voting registration against African Americans, Latinos, women, immigrants, and people with disabilities.
    Although I am not old enough to vote yet, I understand how important that right is, and I have learned that it is at the very core of our democracy. Voting allows you to express your opinion on issues that are important to you, and the direction you would like our government to take. Each person’s vote must be valued, guarded, and protected against those people willing to steal, cheat and sell votes. In these historic times we are seeing challenges to the past election. I believe we must have robust review of election results to ensure the validity and confidence of all Americans regardless of who you voted for or the results. The integrity of voting must represent honesty for our citizens to believe in our government.
    I believe everyone’s vote counts and one vote can make a difference; your vote expresses your voice in this political world. To me, fair voting rights represent the physical act of voting “by the people and for the people”, and that political change will be done by a peaceful election at the ballot box and not by violence in the streets.
    The 1965 Voting Rights Act, addressed many of the racially motivated Jim Crow tactics used for suppressing votes of minorities. I am living in a better world where I am inspired, moved, and grateful for the current voting rights we have, but more must be done to ensure that we do not encourage voter suppression by making it harder for people to vote. We should use technology to address these issues and allow extended hours while placing relevant voter security with multiple ways for voters to identify themselves.
    Today, in the modern digital world our appearance and what we say has changed thanks to Facebook postings, and texting, our communication is only a push of a button away. Being able to respond to a post and rely on the accuracy of information is most important when influencing voters. However, this requires a balancing of the freedom from censorship versus the protection of fraudulent voting information. Presently, Americans must learn to exercise judgment in verifying what they read or heard for themselves, in a responsible manner and not just believe what is said because it was posted on the internet. We have all heard the term “Fake News” but each of us must determine for ourselves what is real and what is fake. In the future, I believe voting electronically from anywhere will increase the access to vote and replace the long lines at the ballot box, but we must first perfect and protect the system from hackers stealing votes by verifying the voter’s identity with highly encrypted passwords and DNA scans.
    Finally, we honor everyone when we exercise our sacred privilege to vote, to all those who came before and sacrificed too much for us to have this right. I look forward to the day I will be given the ballot to participate in determining the future of our country.

    References
    Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. 1957 speech, “Give Us the Ballot”.
    (Speech and video clips) (11/22/2019). [Web]. Retrieved from: https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=1341&v=3AKVzLB7uCc&feature=emb_logo

    Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., “I have a dream”. (Speech and video clips) (11/29/2019). [Web]. Retrieved from: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3vDWWy4CMhE

    Martin Luther King, Jr. – Minister & Civil Rights Activist | Mini Bio | BIO (video) Published on Jan 8, 2010 (11/29/2019). [Web]. Retrieved from: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3ank52Zi_S0

    Lyndon Johnson Bio: U.S. President, Great Society (video) Published on Jan 22, 2013 (11/29/2019). [Web]. Retrieved from: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dEvEuRmImXc

    [read less]

    We must ensure our laws of fair voting rights and registration be updated to our digital world, while we continue to address the past with discriminat…

    [read more]
    0
    • Akheil from Indiana

      I believe the voting rights are not protected. I believe this because only a certain amount of states allow absentee ballots, meaning that only 16 states allow excuses for absentee voting; one them being Indiana. I think this should be for the entire country or for none of the country. We have to find a way to balance this.

      [read less]

      I believe the voting rights are not protected. I believe this because only a certain amount of states allow absentee ballots, meaning that only 16 sta…

      [read more]
      0