Should the United States keep the Electoral College the way it is in the Constitution?

Discuss this question and more with BRI’s #ConstitutionDayLive livestream on our YouTube channel!

Established in Article II, Section 1 of the U.S. Constitution, the Electoral College is the formal body which elects the President and Vice President of the United States. Each state has as many “electors” in the Electoral College as it has Representatives and Senators in the United States Congress, and the District of Columbia has three electors. When voters go to the polls in a Presidential election, they actually are voting for the slate of electors vowing to cast their ballots for that ticket in the Electoral College. Debates have waged on over years and elections as to the modern-day viability and success of the Electoral College.

 Those who say no, the Electoral College should be changed and not kept the way it is, may contemplate amending or abolishing it altogether.  They may have the view that the reasons for which the Founders created the Electoral College are no longer relevant, or that the Electoral College gives too much power to swing states, and ignores the will of the people.  

 Those who say yes, the Electoral College should be kept ‘as-is’, and have opposed changing it have been known to argue that the Electoral College guarantees certainty to the outcome of the presidential election, ensures all parts of the country are involved in selecting the President, or that the Founders enshrined the Electoral College in the Constitution because they thought it was the best method to choose the president.

 What do you think? Should the United States change the Electoral College or keep it in place? Be sure to state what you think the government should or shouldn’t do concerning this issue and why.

 Note: Ideal Think the Vote responses include the following:

 -Address the question asked in a thoughtful and meaningful manner

 -Use cited facts and constitutional arguments when appropriate to support their answers

 -Are expressed in cohesive sentences and is free of distracting spelling, punctuation, and grammatical errors

 -They address counter-arguments and opposing concerns in a respectful manner

 -They organize their answer in a manner that flows logically and reads clearly

Current Standings:
Yes: 67%
No: 33%
  • Matt from Pennsylvania

    The existence of an electoral college is instrumental to democracy and was a key part of the electoral system laid out by our founding fathers. The purpose of the electoral college is to prevent factions based on specific issues from controlling elections. This was argued by James Madison in Federalist Number 51 and has become more relevent than ever as the country feuds over limitations on campaign contributions. The electoral college has maintained their designed impartiality and are crucial to maintaining a thriving representative democracy.

    [read less]

    The existence of an electoral college is instrumental to democracy and was a key part of the electoral system laid out by our founding fathers. The pu…

    [read more]
    1
  • Kristina from Florida

    It has worked for this long and there is not an issue with it currently. If it isn’t broke, don’t fix it.

    1
  • patrick from Florida

    yes

    1
  • Taylor from Tennessee

    The electoral college is a fair way to vote because it is based off of the states population. This ensures that each state is properly represented. This also ensures that political figures try to win the approval of all of the United States, not just the most populated.

    [read less]

    The electoral college is a fair way to vote because it is based off of the states population. This ensures that each state is properly represented. Th…

    [read more]
    1
  • Marlon from Florida

    The electoral college is here to protect the small states from being overlooked by states with massive urban areas.

    0
  • Christian from Florida

    Yes I believe this is so. The reason being is because the electoral college is here to further democracy and is a key part in the electoral system

    0
  • mason. from Florida

    i believe that the electoral college should stay instated in voting policies due to the actual framing of the framework of america

    0
  • Jayson from Florida

    Yes, The Electoral college is completely constitutional, and helps the people get their voice out.

    0
  • Trey from Virginia

    When our founding fathers wrote the Constitution, they included Article II, Section 1 in order to add the Electoral College to help out citizens in the voting process to make their voice heard, as many were uninformed, so they had electors vote for their candidate of choice. This system has been in place for over 200 years, and over the span of 45 different presidents. However, over the past couple of years, the electoral college has been a highly debated issue, especially after Trump’s election in 2016. Many argue that the electoral college is pointless in an age where information runs rampant online and on the airwaves, where it is easy to form an opinion, unlike back in the 1700’s. However, I believe that the Electoral College, while not perfect, does help streamline votes, and also helps smaller states like Rhode Island and Delaware have a say in the election, even if it may be a small one. If we went to a strict popular vote system, then these smaller states would be cancelled out almost entirely by states such as Texas and California. So while the Electoral College may not be perfect, it is the best way we currently have to have each state have a say in the presidential election and to help streamline votes.

    [read less]

    When our founding fathers wrote the Constitution, they included Article II, Section 1 in order to add the Electoral College to help out citizens in th…

    [read more]
    0
    • Bo from Florida

      you got it tray

      0
  • Sarah from Kentucky

    The Electoral College allows for more representation for smaller, less populated states. It’s purpose is to provide equal voting representation for states of various sizes and act as a buffer for the popular vote preventing larger, more populous states from swaying the election and ensuring that each state has an equal impact on the election. The Electoral College is necessary in order to ensure the rights and equal opportunities guaranteed by the Constitution.

    [read less]

    The Electoral College allows for more representation for smaller, less populated states. It’s purpose is to provide equal voting representation for …

    [read more]
    0
  • Brady from Kentucky

    America should keep the Electoral College because it allows the smaller states like Vermont to not be ignored by the political campaign. Additionally, it protects from the “tyranny of the majority” by making it so that no state has too many votes. For example, in California, if the two votes were given to each state California’s large population would not be taken into account and it would give too much power to the small states. On the other hand, if the votes per state were only based on population, then the large states would have too much power. Ultimately, I believe the Electoral College allows for a balance between the large and small states.

    [read less]

    America should keep the Electoral College because it allows the smaller states like Vermont to not be ignored by the political campaign. Additionally,…

    [read more]
    0
  • Maia from Kentucky

    I think that the idea of the electoral college as protection against the tyranny of the majority is a fantastic one. It is meant to make it impossible for the presidential candidates to ignore any one state and give all their attention to the ones with the big cities. This way every state matters, not just the ones with bigger and more concentrated populations. In the 2016 election Donald Trump made it a point to make sure he visited all the states and make them feel like they all counted, which thanks to the electoral college, they do. Additionally, if the U.S. did away with the electoral college, there would be a lot of people who were completely ignorant of how politics works. All they would care about is what the media is saying.

    [read less]

    I think that the idea of the electoral college as protection against the tyranny of the majority is a fantastic one. It is meant to make it impossible…

    [read more]
    0
  • Drew from Kentucky

    The Electoral College should stay the way it is because every 10 years the members of the college are updated because of the census. This allows the college to change with the times and not be something of the past that is not relevant today. Even though some states have a massive pool of electoral college votes the smaller states also matter because the count can be close. This offsets the “imbalance” some people think there is because if either only the big states or small states mattered then it would not be balanced. Since every electoral vote matters, the system isn’t the best, but it serves the purpose.

    [read less]

    The Electoral College should stay the way it is because every 10 years the members of the college are updated because of the census. This allows the c…

    [read more]
    0
  • Lauren from Kentucky

    Through Article II of the Constitution, you can observe that the founding fathers intended the right to elect a president to be in the hands of the state officials. This is contradictory to people’s beliefs that the American citizens should have the final say on who is elected. Allowing electors rather than the popular vote elect the president represents the way in which the elite model of democracy helps shape the government today.

    [read less]

    Through Article II of the Constitution, you can observe that the founding fathers intended the right to elect a president to be in the hands of the st…

    [read more]
    0
  • Tyler from Virginia

    Yes the electoral college should be kept how it was created in the Constitution. The electoral college makes sure every state even the small ones have a say in who’s president and gives everyone a voice. If the electoral college was taken away then the large cities and the states with larger populations would be determining every election and the politicians wouldn’t even cater towards the smaller states because they would only be focused on the large cities. The electoral college needs to be kept in order to keep America a democracy and to give every state and citizen a voice in government.

    [read less]

    Yes the electoral college should be kept how it was created in the Constitution. The electoral college makes sure every state even the small ones have…

    [read more]
    0
  • Sophia from Kentucky

    If the electoral college did not exist, political candidates would only campaign in the most populated areas such as New York City, Chicago, and Los Angeles to name a few. Therefore, it would be virtually useless for people to vote in smaller states, as their vote would not significantly impact the election. The electoral college was put into place by the founding fathers for reasons similar to why each state gets two representatives in Senate: it gives small states enough representation. However, the electoral college also compromises the fact that larger states do receive more electoral votes based on population, and yet still gives small states enough representation that candidates cannot ignore them for their campaign in case of a close election. Overall, I believe that the electoral college is necessary for the American government because it continues to ensure representation for voters in all size states.

    [read less]

    If the electoral college did not exist, political candidates would only campaign in the most populated areas such as New York City, Chicago, and Los A…

    [read more]
    0
  • Anna from Kentucky

    I believe that the Electoral College is a fair and just way to ensure that every state’s voice is heard.
    While the term “electoral college” never appears in the Constitution, Article II of the Constitution and the 12th Amendment contain details about “electors”, which implies the need for state representation. Some argue that the Electoral College is outdated and corrupt; however, I believe that it provides a check and balance to the popular vote and forces presidential candidates to focus on every state and their importance rather than just densely-populated states such as California and Texas. Therefore, the government should keep the Electoral College because it acts as a supplement to the popular vote and prevents America from becoming into a country where only a handful of large states enforce the entire nation’s agenda.

    [read less]

    I believe that the Electoral College is a fair and just way to ensure that every state’s voice is heard.
    While the term “electoral college” ne…

    [read more]
    0
  • Aaron from Kentucky

    The electoral college helps to maintain the value of each US citizen’s vote. Without the electoral college, the popular votes in states such as New York, California, Florida, and Texas would make up 1/3 of the total popular vote. A presidental candiate could focus their campaign on winning those four states and a few others and relatively easily win the presidency. However, the electoral college allow each state to have an impact on the result of the presidental election. This encourages people from all states to vote due to the fact that their individual vote can have a greater affect on the outcome of the election.

    [read less]

    The electoral college helps to maintain the value of each US citizen’s vote. Without the electoral college, the popular votes in states such as New Yo…

    [read more]
    0
  • Chase from Virginia

    Congress should keep the Electoral College in the Constitution because to change it would not only change the way we vote, but also many other processes. Voting by popular vote would most likely end up with the same party getting elected many times in a row. Another reason that we should keep the Electoral College is that many people are misinformed or uninformed about presidential candidates, and often choose based on a few beliefs, by party, or by what their parents believe in. To be able to trust voters with making educated decisions, we would need to educate them with the facts, not what the media makes up or falsely advertises.

    [read less]

    Congress should keep the Electoral College in the Constitution because to change it would not only change the way we vote, but also many other process…

    [read more]
    0
  • Jacob from Kentucky

    The electoral college should remain as the system that we elect the president as it ensures that every state has a say in the political system. The electoral college forces candidates to visit states that they would never visit if it was just a popular vote. A popular vote for the presidency would cause presidential candidates to remain in large centers of the population such as Ney York City or Los Angeles, and eliminate visits to smaller centers of population. The electoral college requires candidates to address America’s problems that affect those in rural or lower population areas, and not in urban areas. This system of reaching out to most Americans ensures everyone’s say in the political system.

    [read less]

    The electoral college should remain as the system that we elect the president as it ensures that every state has a say in the political system. The el…

    [read more]
    0
  • JP from Kentucky

    The United should keep the electoral college. As is it good for states with greater populations and small population. The EC allows a perfect balance as it makes every state matter in some way. There are the safe states that always vote democrat such as California and Texas who always votes Republican. With the two biggest states according to population voting for parties that differ it allows the smaller states to matter when it comes to electing the president. Which is where Hillary Clinton messed up in the 2016 election as she didn’t go to some states as she felt she already won them. For example Iowa which voted Republican yet usually votes Democrat. That is just one example of how every state atters when using the electoral college. It allows balence between states and voters. Some people make the argument that people in safe states voting the oppisite way there vote dosn’t matter that’s not true. Every vote is still counted and taken into consideration by the EC.

    [read less]

    The United should keep the electoral college. As is it good for states with greater populations and small population. The EC allows a perfect balance …

    [read more]
    0
  • Jessica from Kentucky

    The Electoral College is helpful when it comes to voting. Not everyone in the United states votes and the Electoral College allows votes to be distributed evenly throughout the nation. With the Electoral College, small states with a lower population get a equal voice to more populated states. The president doesn’t visit small states as much as larger states. The Electoral College make sure the president addresses the needs to the entire nation. The Electoral College also funds federalism which shares powers between the states and the national government. The Electoral College allows states to freely choose who they want to elect president and vice president. The Electoral College represents a representative democracy which allows people to choose who they want to represent our country.

    [read less]

    The Electoral College is helpful when it comes to voting. Not everyone in the United states votes and the Electoral College allows votes to be distrib…

    [read more]
    0
  • Dylan from Kentucky

    In today’s day and with ease of access to different kinds of media it is easy for people to get a biased or false view on others. This along with all the different news coverages and false stories and allegations going on makes it hard to get a true grasp on what you are supporting. Many people are unaware in terms of politics and may not know what they are truly voting for. With this being said the electoral college involves those who directly see politics and work through politics in their everyday life and ensures those people are making the decisions and not just the common man who may not have a true grasp on politics.

    [read less]

    In today’s day and with ease of access to different kinds of media it is easy for people to get a biased or false view on others. This along with all …

    [read more]
    0
  • Alex from Kentucky

    The responsibility of men and women these days are very limited, I mean half of America doesn’t even vote for elections. This shows that we need a more responsible group of people to know what is best for our state and country. Most people do not really know what is going on in the election either and don’t think before they vote causing chaos.

    [read less]

    The responsibility of men and women these days are very limited, I mean half of America doesn’t even vote for elections. This shows that we need a mor…

    [read more]
    0
  • Joseph from Kentucky

    I believe that we should keep the electoral college because it helps the people understand more about the candidate. The electoral college votes for someone who they believe will best represent the government . I personally feel if the electoral college was not a thing than people would go and vote for someone who they find most appealing to them and not vote for someone who is best for the overall government.

    [read less]

    I believe that we should keep the electoral college because it helps the people understand more about the candidate. The electoral college votes for s…

    [read more]
    0
  • Brady from Kentucky

    The United States should definitely keep the electoral college, because it gives states the states electors based off of the states population. While this doesn’t ensure the winning candidate won the majority vote, they had to have get the most electoral college votes. By winning the electoral college, the winning candidate in a way does get the popular vote, because they got the most electoral votes, and the electoral votes are counted based off the state’s population.The electoral college gives all states an equal chance to make an impact on who wins the election. Big states get more electoral college votes, so they are obviously going to be target states, but they can still be swing states, and make the candidates work to get them. Small states are important if there are two close candidates, because the extra 3 or 4 electoral votes could win them the presidency.

    [read less]

    The United States should definitely keep the electoral college, because it gives states the states electors based off of the states population. While …

    [read more]
    0
  • Nick from Kentucky

    I feel like they should keep the Electoral College the same because of the experience and insight those in the Electoral College have. A good amount of people who vote do not really know what they are even voting for. Media and news sways their opinions by feeding them general statements about candidates that may not even be true. The people in the Electoral College are more educated, and therefore can make a more informed choice on who should be running our country and making the important decisions that will affect our whole country.

    [read less]

    I feel like they should keep the Electoral College the same because of the experience and insight those in the Electoral College have. A good amount o…

    [read more]
    0
  • Jake from Kentucky

    I believe the Electoral College should stay the same as it was written in the Constitution because I feel like if it was taken away, less people would vote. The reason I say this is because if the presidential election was based off of popular vote, many people would not think their vote matters with 300 plus million other votes. The electoral college keeps the voting competition in each state smaller and more fun to watch. I feel that is the electoral college was taken away that we as Americans would see a dramatic decrease in voter turnout.

    [read less]

    I believe the Electoral College should stay the same as it was written in the Constitution because I feel like if it was taken away, less people would…

    [read more]
    0
  • Sean from Kentucky

    I believe the electoral college should remain,as without it small states would experience little to no representation. The electoral college gives these small states an opportunity to voice their concerns. A state such as California would dominate an election even more so than it already does if it were determined by popularity.

    [read less]

    I believe the electoral college should remain,as without it small states would experience little to no representation. The electoral college gives …

    [read more]
    0
  • Jacob from Kentucky

    I think the US should keep the electoral college because its a system most people in the United States are used to. There no reason to change the system many americans are used to. If the US were to change the system then what would they change it to?

    [read less]

    I think the US should keep the electoral college because its a system most people in the United States are used to. There no reason to change the syst…

    [read more]
    0
  • Morgan from Kentucky

    The electoral college should be kept the way it is in the constitution because as of right now, it is not a gigantic argument in our world. Yes some people may be upset that it is the way it is, but it is obviously working. I think it is fair the way that it is because some states have a much larger population than other states. You need to have more electoral leaders in the larger states so that everyone is able to have their voices heard. Is there are not enough electoral voters in a state then the country will remain the same and new voices will not be heard.

    [read less]

    The electoral college should be kept the way it is in the constitution because as of right now, it is not a gigantic argument in our world. Yes some …

    [read more]
    0
  • Logan from Kentucky

    In a world constantly changing, we should not try to overfix things. Whether our electoral college is fair or an accurate method of voting anymore is not the issue. As a nation, we choose our candidates and give them every opportunity to make themselves more popular with the public. This is our Republic at work. We hear their speeches, and whether we agree or disagree, we vote on our favorite. The electoral college merely adds to our opinions.

    [read less]

    In a world constantly changing, we should not try to overfix things. Whether our electoral college is fair or an accurate method of voting anymore is …

    [read more]
    0
  • Gus from Indiana

    When the founding fathers wrote the electoral college into the Constitution, they did so with the intent of equal representation and a fair voting system. The only reason to make a change in the Constitution is if civilization has involved in a way to make a part of it obsolete, which has not happened to the electoral college. This system has not failed us yet and there is no reason to change it.

    [read less]

    When the founding fathers wrote the electoral college into the Constitution, they did so with the intent of equal representation and a fair voting sys…

    [read more]
    0
  • Connor from Kentucky

    Yes, the Electoral College should be left the way the founding fathers meant it to be in the constitution. If the Electoral College were to be changed and taken out, our larger cities like New York, Los Angeles, and Chicago would determine the outcome of every election. It allows for a balance, so our smaller states have a say and aren’t overwhelmed by the large populations and bigger poles in bigger states.

    [read less]

    Yes, the Electoral College should be left the way the founding fathers meant it to be in the constitution. If the Electoral College were to be changed…

    [read more]
    0
  • John from Kentucky

    The Electoral College should be kept the way it is in the Constitution. It gives people with all different types of backgrounds a say in the vote. If the election was only the total popular vote, it would not give people in smaller states or less densely populated areas any power in electing the president. Most large cities will have a much larger total population than smaller areas, and more often than not most people in those areas vote for the same party. This could give one party or another almost a guaranteed win every four years.

    [read less]

    The Electoral College should be kept the way it is in the Constitution. It gives people with all different types of backgrounds a say in the vote. If …

    [read more]
    0
  • Emma from Kentucky

    Yes, I think that the United States should keep the electoral college the same. They made it the way it is for a reason. All states should have an equal say in who is president. If they changed it, the larger populated states would win every time and would decide who becomes president. Which is completely unfair. We don’t need to fix something that is not broke.

    [read less]

    Yes, I think that the United States should keep the electoral college the same. They made it the way it is for a reason. All states should have an equ…

    [read more]
    0
  • Andrew from Kentucky

    I think they should keep it because why change what is not broken. It has worked for this long so why try to change it. Mostly the people want it changed are the states with little to no people. Also this is how the Founding fathers wanted it so let’s keep it how they would like it.

    [read less]

    I think they should keep it because why change what is not broken. It has worked for this long so why try to change it. Mostly the people want it chan…

    [read more]
    0
  • Nick from Kentucky

    I think the Electoral College should remain effective in the United States, as it was put in the Constitution. Each and every state should have an opportunity to voice their opinions on these crucial topics. If the Electoral College was not in effect, the deciding factor on whether or not a candidate wins would be restricted to less than 10 states. Since the US is not a direct democracy, we should continue to come together as states to decide on these elections.

    [read less]

    I think the Electoral College should remain effective in the United States, as it was put in the Constitution. Each and every state should have an opp…

    [read more]
    0
  • Joseph from Kentucky

    I think the electoral college gives a fair representation for each state. Certain states want Democratic candidates and others want Republican candidates. The electoral college’s point system is a great way for each state as a whole to be represented.

    [read less]

    I think the electoral college gives a fair representation for each state. Certain states want Democratic candidates and others want Republican candida…

    [read more]
    0
  • Garrett from Kentucky

    The Electoral College should be kept because of the way the electors are chosen. In order for the electors to be selected in each state, the citizens vote on their electors when they go to vote for president. The electors then vote for the president in the Electoral College. While the amount of electors per state is decided by population, the people vote for those electors which means the election for the president is ultimately decided by the people. people’s vote does matter in the system.

    [read less]

    The Electoral College should be kept because of the way the electors are chosen. In order for the electors to be selected in each state, the citizens …

    [read more]
    0
  • Becca from Kentucky

    We should keep the Electoral College the way it is because it gives the smaller states an equal voice with the bigger states that have a larger population. This will make sure that every state is heard and that the president and vice president listen to their concerns too. Furthermore, the United States was built on the basis of federalism and if we change the Electoral College then we lose the distribution of power amongst the nation. Finally, the Electoral College has been in place for hundreds of years so why change it now because it has worked the majority of the time except for when Thomas Jefferson and John Quincy Adams were elected.

    [read less]

    We should keep the Electoral College the way it is because it gives the smaller states an equal voice with the bigger states that have a larger popula…

    [read more]
    0
  • Madison from Kentucky

    I believe that the electoral college should stay the way it is because it gives smaller states the chance to have a bigger voice and speak their opinion towards the matter. “The founding fathers established it in the Constitution as a compromise between election of the President by a vote in Congress and election of the President by a popular vote of qualified citizens”(archives.gov). This is how the founding fathers wanted the voting rights to be, this is how the electoral college was designed. Designed in order to give everyone a voice, not just the big man in charge. The electoral college is a fair way of voting and it should stay the same.

    [read less]

    I believe that the electoral college should stay the way it is because it gives smaller states the chance to have a bigger voice and speak their opini…

    [read more]
    0
  • Noel from Kentucky

    The electoral college is an ordered system that gives both small and large states voices. For example, the state of Kentucky receives 8 electoral college votes. This equates to 1 electoral college vote per amount of citizens. In a large state such as New York, 1 electoral college vote will be for a larger amount of citizens, such as 650,000. Therefore, citizens of New York will have a little less say than Kentucky. Overall, I agree with the current electoral college because it provides a voice for both large and small states.

    [read less]

    The electoral college is an ordered system that gives both small and large states voices. For example, the state of Kentucky receives 8 electoral coll…

    [read more]
    0
  • Amber from Kentucky

    Should the United States change the Electoral College or keep it in place? Yes, they should keep the Electoral College because it has been the same way ever since the Consitution has been written. Changing the Electoral College means that we have to change the Consitution. And if we change the Constitution we are changing the way our founding fathers wanted the nation to be.

    [read less]

    Should the United States change the Electoral College or keep it in place? Yes, they should keep the Electoral College because it has been the same wa…

    [read more]
    0
  • Emma from Kentucky

    The electors for the Electoral College are divided by the population of the state, so states with more people get more electors. The system allows people from all over the United States to be heard. While the population dense states may have a bigger say it is only fair because they are representing a large number of people. With that being said, the small states can not be overlooked as they also hold some sway in the vote and in close elections can be the difference between a win or a loss for a presidential candidate.

    [read less]

    The electors for the Electoral College are divided by the population of the state, so states with more people get more electors. The system allows peo…

    [read more]
    0
  • Joseph from Kentucky

    The current electoral college provides a state of equality for differing perspectives. If each voter were to have perfectly equal power, then people in rural areas would likely lose to urban citizens every time. The US needs these rural workers and they might be influenced to change lifestyles if not given a voice. This could result in an imbalance of our nation’s economy and promote stale ideas from a hive mind.

    [read less]

    The current electoral college provides a state of equality for differing perspectives. If each voter were to have perfectly equal power, then people i…

    [read more]
    0
  • Alex from Kentucky

    The Electoral College should stay the same and remain unchanged. It gives the smaller states a better chance to have their voices heard. Through only popular votes, their votes could potentially be overlooked and insignificant, whereas the electoral college gives them the power to sway the presidential election in favor of one candidate or the other. The Electoral College provides a sense of balance to the voting process of a president.

    [read less]

    The Electoral College should stay the same and remain unchanged. It gives the smaller states a better chance to have their voices heard. Through only …

    [read more]
    0
  • charlie from Kentucky

    The electoral college helps keep the small states a priority. If the presidential race is close, you might need a small state here and there to give your vote the edge and put you over the top. The electoral college balances out the different states. However in the present day with all the technology, people can be easily persuaded with who to vote for and their minds can easily be changed. With this being said on the down side I think the people’s votes don’t matter as much because the candidates usually rely on the electoral college mainly.

    [read less]

    The electoral college helps keep the small states a priority. If the presidential race is close, you might need a small state here and there to give y…

    [read more]
    0
  • Sydney from Kentucky

    I think the United States should keep the Electoral College the way it is, and the way it is in the Constitution. The Electoral College to me knows best. They know who to choose for president and vice president. They have a major role for the United States. Lastly, I think it causes less arguments and puts it down to less people to decide instead of the whole U.S fighting about it.

    [read less]

    I think the United States should keep the Electoral College the way it is, and the way it is in the Constitution. The Electoral College to me knows be…

    [read more]
    0
  • Erin from Kentucky

    Yes, the Electoral College should be kept the way that it is. It gives the smaller states a chance for their voices to be heard. If there were no electoral college, one party may wipe out the whole election just because of some of the bigger states being one way or another. This way there is a chance for all states to weigh in and balance out the votes for a fair election.

    [read less]

    Yes, the Electoral College should be kept the way that it is. It gives the smaller states a chance for their voices to be heard. If there were no elec…

    [read more]
    0
  • Ryan from Kentucky

    The electoral college creates the ability for smaller states to have a voice. Without it, smaller states would feel unrepresented and voters in these states would feel as if their vote doesn’t matter any more than it already does. Voting is already at an incredibly low amount taking away the electoral college creates a feeling of being uninvolved with the elections. Keeping the electoral college allows for smaller states to have their voice heard.

    [read less]

    The electoral college creates the ability for smaller states to have a voice. Without it, smaller states would feel unrepresented and voters in these …

    [read more]
    0
  • Zoe from Kentucky

    The Electoral College should remain the way it is in the Constitution because it truly does protect smaller states and their votes. Their votes matter in there Electoral College vote. Without the electoral college, states with bigger cities would decide the who the president will be without the influence of smaller states. The Electoral College allows the United States to vote as a whole nation. Also, it is incredibly easy to convince or bribe people to vote for someone. The Electoral College helps to eliminate this issue.

    [read less]

    The Electoral College should remain the way it is in the Constitution because it truly does protect smaller states and their votes. Their votes matter…

    [read more]
    0
  • Caleb from Virginia

    While in the new age of communication and technology, people are extremely susceptible to being manipulated into believing biased articles and false information. This is the drawback of being so close to the media at all times

    [read less]

    While in the new age of communication and technology, people are extremely susceptible to being manipulated into believing biased articles and false i…

    [read more]
    0
  • Joshua from Utah

    The founding fathers didn’t trust the general public to elect the president, I don’t feel the need to provide evidence to show how generally uneducated the public is on matters concerning politics and government. Also, the electoral college protects every type of citizens interested. Not only those who live in big cities, but those farmers and others who live in rural areas have their voice heard as well. In my eyes it is just another protection against tyranny of the majority.

    [read less]

    The founding fathers didn’t trust the general public to elect the president, I don’t feel the need to provide evidence to show how generally uneducate…

    [read more]
    0
  • Peyton from New York

    The idea that the Electoral College should be abolished and removed from the Constitution is predicated on the belief that we are a Democracy and should be moving towards it in every way, but the truth is we are not. The Electoral College itself is a great example of this, as it was made to offset the harms of Democracies, seeing as only the majority opinion will ever survive, with minorities being left behind. This is why founders, such as James Madison was so critical of Democratic systems of government. As well you can point to the process of picking Justices to the Supreme Court, Federal Circuit Judges, Presidential Cabinet members, and how Senators used to be chosen before the 17th amendment. All of which only involve a small group of people choosing them to the position, with certain guidelines that are rather undemocratic to select them. Though regardless of us not being a Democracy, it is wrong of us to seek this goal. As previously mentioned Democracies are riddled with the issue of ignoring minorities, especially minority opinions. If we resorted a popular vote system, the opinions and well being of smaller population states such as Wyoming or Montana would be completely neglected by our governing body. Only the most populous states would have any real bearing on decision making and be allowed to enact policies that may help their states, but completely jeopardize the well being of others. This is an unavoidable reality of Democracies, as in them, citizens and legislators tend to have higher time preferences, meaning their decision making is based entirely on the short term, present and near future effects, rather than long term implications. Democracies are easily subverted, as the people give in to moments of fear. One only need to look at the Red Scare, and see how the people voted for wars and persecution of peoples due to their ideological beliefs, because politicians instilled fear in them. Even looking to the popular support of certain policies that are now universally agreed to be deplorable, such as slavery and the removal and genocide of Native Americans from the land they resided on. If one is to see the case for keeping the Electoral College and not moving towards Democracy, one only needs to examine the history of the U.S. and the people’s beliefs and speak to the average voter.

    [read less]

    The idea that the Electoral College should be abolished and removed from the Constitution is predicated on the belief that we are a Democracy and shou…

    [read more]
    0
  • Colton from Virginia

    Yes the Electoral College should be kept the way the Constitution intended it to be. It helps to capture the true feeling of the american people as a nation. If there were no Electoral College, states with major cities like Los Angeles and New York City would determine the president year after year. This would lead to a government where the true feelings of the people across the country were not being heard.

    [read less]

    Yes the Electoral College should be kept the way the Constitution intended it to be. It helps to capture the true feeling of the american people as a …

    [read more]
    0
  • Christopher from Georgia

    While the debate over whether the Electoral College should amended is certainly not a new one, it has become a prominent issue in the 2020 Presidential race.
    Those who say that the Electoral College is outdated and obsolete point to the elections of two of the last three presidents – George W. Bush and Donald Trump – who won the electoral vote while losing the national popular vote. Understandably so, this side questions why a candidate should be able to win the presidency without receiving votes from the majority of the population. After all, this is a democracy where the majority rules. Further, opponents of the Electoral College proffer the argument that everyone’s vote should be equal, and in their eyes the Electoral College prevents that. Those opposed believe that it is imperative that the Electoral College be amended if our democracy is to survive another turbulent century.
    Those in favor of the Electoral College approach the argument from a very different manner. They state that the Founders struck a powerful and lasting compromise which allowed every area, region, and state in the Union to have an equal opportunity to make their opinions heard at the ballot box. Amending the Electoral College, they say, would silence the voices of rural Americans and create a Union in which only the voices of urban areas are heard. Furthermore, proponents of the Electoral College mention the fact that this institution prevents significant, nationwide voting complications. They point to Florida in the 2000 presidential race and the painstaking recounting process that occurred there. They present the idea that abolishing the Electoral College would make this horror a reality on a national scale, which may delay the Inauguration of a President for months. Advocates for this institution believe that the Constitution should be approached with caution lest we cause the foundations of this country to crumble.
    This debate presents the opportunity for America to do what it does best – compromise. Advocates and adversaries to the Electoral College could meet in the middle just as the Founders met halfway on so many issues. The best way forward is one in which the country’s founding institutions are not ripped out with force, but rather adjusted to meet the age’s needs. The Electoral College should remain in place while the “winner-take-all” system should not. As Nebraska and Maine split their electoral vote based on the popular vote, so too should every other state in the Union. This way, rural Americans still have a voice and the electoral vote would more closely reflect the popular vote. Each side would be pleased in some manner, and our democracy could become more responsive. The best way forward for America is not left or right, it’s a straight path up the middle.

    [read less]

    While the debate over whether the Electoral College should amended is certainly not a new one, it has become a prominent issue in the 2020 Presidentia…

    [read more]
    0
  • Jacob from Texas

    The United States of America is not a direct democracy. It is a representative republic. Each state gets a vote for every senator of congressman and Washington DC also gets three votes. Abolishing the electoral college would hand power to California, New York, and Illinois. The people of the other Forty-Seven states need a say in the affairs of the country. The electoral college is a perfect way to do that.

    [read less]

    The United States of America is not a direct democracy. It is a representative republic. Each state gets a vote for every senator of congressman and…

    [read more]
    0
  • Teddy from New York

    Some of society’s brightest minds have commented on the importance of fair representation in our democracy. Thomas Paine: “The right of voting for representation is the primary right by which other rights are protected.” James Madison: “If the power is not immediately derived from the people in proportion to their numbers, we may make a paper confederacy, but that will be all.”

    If proportional representation is so integral to the notion of American representative democracy, our country should, at a minimum, use it to elect our President. The United States’s archaic Electoral College system, however, assigns votes not to people, but to states, making votes from certain states much more valuable than votes from others. In this system, all states start with three Electoral votes, and the remainder are allocated based on state population. This means that a citizen from Wyoming’s vote has the effective impact of the votes of four Californians. In other words, all votes are theoretically “equal,” but across state borders, some votes are more equal than others. This is not democracy, and not tolerable in any election. Therefore, it is time for America to take a step in the right direction and amend the Constitution to replace the Electoral College with a direct national vote.

    The Electoral College is so unfair that it begs the question as to why it was implemented in the first place. It arose from the unique historical circumstances at the time during which the Constitution was proposed, including slavery and the lack of modern communication technology. Yale University Sterling Professor of Law and Political Science Akhil Reed Amar emphasizes that the Electoral College put Southern states at an advantage in electing the president. Even though each slave was counted as only three-fifths of a person, this distribution effectively increased the voting power of the white voters in those states. Southern slaveholders were able to gain a majority in almost all of their respective states, giving them a huge number of electoral votes and most of the time, the power to sway the election. Therefore, the Electoral College was created to increase the voting power of these slave owners.

    In addition, communication resources were far behind those of modern society and technology. As a result, the Founding Fathers were concerned that voters wouldn’t have sufficient information about candidates from outside their home states, and would be compelled to vote for a regional “favorite son.” In addition, since information at the time moved so slowly (for context, the fastest way to get around was riding a horse) and the United States was so large, it would have been near impossible to count the votes in a timely manner. In this historical context, sending representatives who would cast each state’s vote to convene in Washington DC, where they could access the most up-to-date information about the election and nation at large, made more sense. It was the best option they had at the time.

    However, the times have obviously changed. Slavery was abolished more than 150 years ago, exponentially more votes can be counted in a fraction of the time they used to, and information spreads rapidly through fiber-optic cables. Now, presidential debates are nationally televised; in fact, more than 84 million people viewed the last debate in the 2016 Election. We can access candidates’ views on every issue in seconds, read relevant news from around the US and the world, and communicate voting information across the country in milliseconds. In short, the reasons for the Electoral College’s existence are entirely obsolete.

    Its drawbacks, however, still affect the country today. Because of the system’s winner-take-all policy on a state level, British educator Cgp Grey demonstrates that a candidate could theoretically win the presidency with only 22 percent of the national vote. Though that is admittedly a doomsday scenario, the fact that this demographic travesty is even possible shows how grossly unrepresentative the Electoral College is as an institution. The extent of the Electoral College’s overrepresentation of small states and winner-take-all policy is bad enough in practicality that is has resulted in four separate instances of the winner of the popular vote losing the presidential election. In an increasingly polarized country with small states and large states voting more uniformly against each other, the electoral distortion is only getting worse. In fact, the Electoral College has defied the popular vote in two of the last five elections.

    While the Electoral College system hurts the majority of US voters, the small state and swing state voters who benefit at their expense are disproportionately white. Because of its small state bias due to the three electoral vote minimum and demographic trends alone, the Center for Economic and Policy Research’s blog estimates that for every average white vote, an African American would have .95 of a vote, an Asian American would have .93, and a Hispanic person would have .91.

    Think that’s bad? Don’t worry, it gets worse. Ari Bronstein of The Daily Kos has combined all 50 states’ 2016 population, electoral votes, and margin for either Trump or Clinton in 2016 to create a Voter Power Index (VPI) showing how much each vote actually counted in the election. He found that while 35 states had VPIs under 2, the two extremely close swing states of Michigan and New Hampshire had VPIs of, respectively, 46.9 and 47.9. That means that as a citizen in the large and strongly partisan state of New York with a VPI of .5, my vote would count more than 90 times less than that of someone from Michigan or New Hampshire. These two states also have populations that are 80 and 93 percent white compared to a national population that is only 63 percent white.

    Some argue that without the Electoral College, recounts would have to be performed on a nationwide scale, and as a result would become extremely difficult. This is not true because the infrastructure for these recounts is already in place: Large states like California and New York have already demonstrated the ability to easily handle recounts in governor’s races, and if a presidential race was close enough, those recounts would occur simultaneously on a state-by-state level. In addition, there are more than two months between when a president is elected and when he or she is inaugurated, providing ample time for recounts and clarification. Some supporters of the Electoral College also say that voter fraud would increase under a national popular vote. They claim that while the Electoral College incentivizes falsifying vote totals in just a handful of close swing states where it could realistically make a difference in the result of the election, a national popular vote would lead to more widely spread voter fraud, making it harder to catch. However, for that to be true, there should be massive attempted voter fraud in close swing states under the status quo. In fact, the Washington Post reports that there were only four documented cases of voter fraud from the 2016 election, only one of which took place in one of the ten most competitive states. Also, saying no one would take the time to commit voter fraud in most states is just a concession to the fact their average votes carry disproportionately small weight.

    The flaws of the Electoral College have, in many cases, led to a minority of Americans having more sway for no reason other than this outdated system. Due to the fact that this minority lives in swing states, they are the people who are most incentivized to keep the Electoral College in place. In addition to having disproportionate power in electing the president, Vermont senator Chris Pearson has noted that these states get more disaster declarations, more No Child Left Behind waivers, and more visits from Cabinet members. President Donald Trump himself tweeted in 2013, “The Electoral College is a disaster for a democracy,” yet in 2016, he called it “actually genius in that it brings all states, even smaller ones, into play.” I wonder what changed…

    [read less]

    Some of society’s brightest minds have commented on the importance of fair representation in our democracy. Thomas Paine: “The right of voting for…

    [read more]
    0
  • Taylor from Pennsylvania

    The United States should keep the electoral college for a few reasons. The first reason is so that politicians can not just campaign in big cities and ignore the rest of the country. As well it allows for a sort of check and balance system. The United States has work for so long because of the checks and balances. Most democracy’s in history have failed the founders New this so they made it a republic. The system might not be fair, some people’s votes may be undervalued however the system encourages majority rule. This issue however would be less important though if we put less focus on the president and more focus on local leaders. Our constitution was set up to focus mainly on local rule, with a small overarching nation government. The founders did not want the president to have the amount of power that they have now. If we were to put less focus on the federal elections the electoral college would matter much less and the issue would be resolved. The president is not just supposed to represent the majority of the country they are supposed to represent the entire country the electoral college ensures this by making sure that the president is elected to by different parts of the country.

    [read less]

    The United States should keep the electoral college for a few reasons. The first reason is so that politicians can not just campaign in big cities and…

    [read more]
    0
  • Cody from Texas

    IF we did away with the electoral college then only about 7 states would decide who is president. Everyone deserves a voice and a say on who’s president. Democrats are just coming up with ways that they can get office every year by doing away with the electoral college. Our founding fathers who fought for this country get to decide therefore leaving the electoral college how it is

    [read less]

    IF we did away with the electoral college then only about 7 states would decide who is president. Everyone deserves a voice and a say on who’s preside…

    [read more]
    0
  • Amy from Texas

    Yes, it should remain the same because every state should get to have an equal say on who becomes president. It shouldn’t be based on what a few states say.

    0
  • Micah from Texas

    dont fix something thats not broke

    0
  • Lincoln from Maryland

    Currently, a 192,579 voters from Wyoming get one vote in the Electoral College. But in California, 719,272 voters get a single vote in the Electoral College. So 192,579 votes from Wyoming are equal to 719,272 votes from California. A voter in Wyoming has more power than a voter in California for no reason other than where that voter lives. With the current Constitution, two votes are unequal in federal presidential elections. That’s not democratic. It’s not even republican. What ends up happening is aristocracy. It’s not a familiar aristocracy, because we don’t expect the farmers of South Dakota to be wearing fine robes and jewels, but this ruling class is less than a majority and represents less than a majority.

    Calling the Electoral College an aristocracy is a bold claim, so let’s go over some history to back it up. During the constitutional convention, the first plan submitted for a federal legislature was the Virginia Plan, in which states would be granted more representatives based on their population. This would be a nice, republican government. But legislators from smaller states claimed that their voices would be drowned out by the larger states. Firstly, this is not true. Large states have never conspired to outvote smaller states. Secondly, if they did, that would be 100% acceptable, because that’s how democracy works. Majority rule with minority rights. The proposed New Jersey Plan (all states get equal number of legislators) would be minority rule with majority rights. So the Framers should have shot down this plan without a second thought, right? The problem lies with mistrust and corruption at the time. Northern framers feared that the southern states (Virginia being the most populous) would grow at a faster rate and end up seizing control of the government. So they wanted to prevent southerner control.

    That didn’t end up happening. The northern states grew at a much faster rate than the southern states. But after the adoption of the Connecticut Compromise and ratification of the Constitution, it was too late. So over the next century during westward expansion, new states are being admitted left and right, without regards to population. Because both the South and the North wanted to establish as many Senatorial votes as possible to maintain and abolish slavery, respectively. Both regions were using an unrepresentative system to muster more Senatorial votes. And now, presently, population lines don’t follow North-South. No, they follow a coastal pattern by which the East and the West coasts have the largest populations (and Texas, classic Texas). So why are we allowing the central states to hold hostage the Senate and presidency? It’s because the Framers never reckoned state population differences would grow so large. And because they never reckoned large geopolitical regions would remain as one state rather than several. Texas and California are being severely underrepresented in the Senate and presidency, due to the selfish and foolish nature of northern legislators who feared southern control. And all these ramblings about the Senate relate directly to the Electoral College, because it affects the unequal distribution of electors.

    Let’s get back to the aristocracy claim. There, we go to Hamilton. In Federalist Paper 68, one on the topic of the electoral college, Alexander Hamilton is exuberant about the idea. He writes about the Electoral College as a group of intelligent, elite persons capable of weighing the options of who to elect for president. That’s “aristokratia,” which means “rule of the best” (Greek etymology). He writes that any group larger than the size of the Congress (the same size as the College) would result in chaos and corruption. But I would argue that it’s much easier to corrupt, say, 270 electors than it is to corrupt 270 million. The electoral college may have served a purpose at the time when public knowledge of politics was very little. But currently in the world of radio, television, easy access to books, and even easier access to the internet, the Constitution has no place telling the public that they don’t know enough to make an educated vote. Because we, the people, do. We’re much smarter and more knowledgeable than in the late 1700s, and we shan’t allow our founding document to claim that we are any lesser.

    [read less]

    Currently, a 192,579 voters from Wyoming get one vote in the Electoral College. But in California, 719,272 voters get a single vote in the Electoral C…

    [read more]
    1
  • Marshall from Texas

    If not for the Electoral College, California and New York would always choose the president because of their large populations. Why would smaller states even show up to the polls if only voting count is used. Remember that the U.S. is a republic, not a democracy, and the Founders wanted to ensure no “mob rule” ideology.

    [read less]

    If not for the Electoral College, California and New York would always choose the president because of their large populations. Why would smaller stat…

    [read more]
    0
  • jada from Florida

    The electoral college doesn’t represent the views of citizens, which really brings us to the question of why do we vote if our votes really don’t matter when it comes to voting for the president.

    [read less]

    The electoral college doesn’t represent the views of citizens, which really brings us to the question of why do we vote if our votes really don’t matt…

    [read more]
    0
  • Brady from Illinois

    The Constitution clearly states how a president is decided and mentions one detail that is sort of a trigger for this whole debate. “Each state shall appoint…a number of electors equal to the whole number of Senators and Representatives to which the State may be entitled in the Congress,” (U.S. Constitution, Article 2, Sec. 1). This clauses defines how many electoral votes each state has. A person on my side of the argument wrote about the imbalance of the popular vote in the difference between California and Wyoming in terms of the value of one person’s vote. However, this argument is slightly inaccurate considering the electoral votes that are currently in place are based on the 2010 census, not the 2019 estimate. Still however, if California had electoral votes to the same ratio as Wyoming, California would have about 194 electoral votes. The reason for this imbalance goes back to Article 2, Section 1 of the Constitution. Each state has two senators NO MATTER their population. So, the 2 California senators are serving about 19.5 million constituents each, while the two Wyoming senators are serving about 290,000 constituents each. 7 states have more senators than representatives in Congress. This is a huge imbalance of power. People in the USA are not fairly represented because of this imbalance.

    Another problem with the Electoral College is that if a presidential candidates wins a state by a single vote, he/she wins all of that state’s electoral votes (assuming the electors do their job well). A candidate can win by a hair and get the reward of basically everyone’s vote in that state. As an example, in the 2000 US Presidential Election, Republican candidate George W. Bush and Democratic candidate Al Gore had a very tight race in Florida. The official count was a difference of 537 votes out of 5,825,043 votes cast. It was very close and George W. Bush ended up receiving all of Florida’s electoral votes. If the electoral votes had been distributed based on each county, rather than the state, Al Gore would have one. This kind of thing has happened many times in history. Because of the aforementioned arguments, the Electoral College should either be replaced or modified to be fairer and more democratic in a growing democracy.

    [read less]

    The Constitution clearly states how a president is decided and mentions one detail that is sort of a trigger for this whole debate. “Each state shall …

    [read more]
    0
  • Drew from Kentucky

    The current way that the electoral college system is set up is not fair to a representative democracy that believes all of their votes count equally. Based on the state you live in your vote can count for more in a presidential election because states with higher populations, and therefore more electoral college votes. Until every American citizen’s vote counts equally the electoral college system won’t be perfect, but I don’t believe it should be scrapped altogether. There are better ways to decide elections besides turning to popular vote. The United States is not a direct democracy and therefore must not be treated as one. There needs to be some sort of representation, but the current system needs to be revised.

    [read less]

    The current way that the electoral college system is set up is not fair to a representative democracy that believes all of their votes count equally. …

    [read more]
    0
  • Daniel from Kentucky

    The Electoral College consists of delegates representing their state. The people of these states do not appoint these electors. Instead, they are appointed to the position based on what political party is in control of that state. This style of nomination weakens the voice of the people as anyone could be given the state’s vote regardless of political knowledge or prowess. If the power to nominate the delegates was given to the public, allowing the voice of the people to be expressed. The Electoral College would be able to both guide our nation on a path to a better future and work to make a better today

    [read less]

    The Electoral College consists of delegates representing their state. The people of these states do not appoint these electors. Instead, they are appo…

    [read more]
    0
  • Laney from Kentucky

    The biggest problem with the way that America votes for its presidents is that the votes are not correctly proportioned. If a state has 50 electoral college votes, and 25% of the population votes for candidate a and 75% votes for candidate b, then 25% of the votes should go to candidate a and 75% go to candidate b. It’s wrong to have all of the allotted votes to go to only one candidate unless every single person in that state voted for that one candidate.

    [read less]

    The biggest problem with the way that America votes for its presidents is that the votes are not correctly proportioned. If a state has 50 electoral c…

    [read more]
    0
  • Adele from Virginia

    The electoral college is an institution that was created during a different time of life. The founding fathers wanted to ensure that the tiny states would be heard just as much as the larger ones, and the system of electors could vote for whoever just in case they thought the people were not making an informed decision. In short, they didn’t trust the people of America to be intelligent or make informed decisions. Today, making sure all votes are heard is still relevant, and it is true that some politicians would only campaign in more largely populated areas and states. However, it is also true that even today most politicians only go for states with more votes or just enough votes to win the election, completely forgetting states such as Rhode Island or the Dakotas. The electoral college may have worked when we were a smaller country, but at this point we have expanded to the point that the system is completely outdated. The electors are no longer to stay completely unbiased and work for the will of the people, and even if the people make an “uneducated decision” that is their decision to make. The electoral college now is around due to tradition, and change is always difficult. However, it is much better to change with the times instead of holding on to the past for no other reason than the fact that it is our history.

    [read less]

    The electoral college is an institution that was created during a different time of life. The founding fathers wanted to ensure that the tiny states w…

    [read more]
    0
  • Kaitlyn from Virginia

    I believe that the Electoral College should be changed from the way it was set in the US Constitution. One reason is that the reasons that the framers set the presidential election this way are no longer relevant. The framers set the Electoral College as they believed that the people were too uneducated to make this decision and they decided on having representatives make this decision instead. While this may have been true then – that many people did not receive a sufficient education – this is not true today. Currently, many people receive some type of education and have a better understanding of government as well as their beliefs and values. People today can also use technology to their advantage to aid them in their decision – if they need information about the candidates, where to go to vote, and other factors can all be accessed by technology and the internet.
    Another point is that without the Electoral College, the so-called “swing states” would be diminished and the idea of “battleground states”. Candidates focus their efforts into these states when campaigning to turn their votes either Democratic or Republican. With the candidates doing their best interests in those states, this leaves the other states alienated from the candidates’’ efforts. With this system, candidates only need to be concerned with the swing states and which way they will go.
    Another reason to change the Electoral College is that it ignores the will of the people. There are 300 million people in the US but only 538 people represent everyone in the election. The candidate that the representative chooses may upset the people, as well as the past presidential election showing that Hillary Clinton won the popular vote but lost the electoral votes. There have been many instances of this happening in elections, like with Geroge W. Bush being elected even though Al Gore won the popular vote. This highlights how the American people choose their president, but it is reversed with the electoral vote/Electoral College system.

    [read less]

    I believe that the Electoral College should be changed from the way it was set in the US Constitution. One reason is that the reasons that the framers…

    [read more]
    0
  • Gabriele from Kentucky

    I think the electoral collage is unnessary in voting for the president. The people vote for the president, so what is the point of a state voting for the president? If the candidate running for president has the popular vote of all the people in the united states then that person should be president. Why give the person with out the popular vote of the people the presidency? If the people want the other candidate to become president. It should be taken out entirely.

    [read less]

    I think the electoral collage is unnessary in voting for the president. The people vote for the president, so what is the point of a state voting for …

    [read more]
    0
  • Maria from Kentucky

    No, the United States should not keep the electoral college the way it is in the constitution. We need to make people feel like they matter. Yes, the founding fathers didn’t trust the general public to elect the president and I understand that. But it’s 2019 now and we have changed over time. There is new technology and everyday people are trying to make the world equal. This is another way to make a difference for the better.

    [read less]

    No, the United States should not keep the electoral college the way it is in the constitution. We need to make people feel like they matter. Yes, the …

    [read more]
    0
  • Isabelle from Kentucky

    The United States should not keep the electoral college the way that it is now because it takes voting out of the hands of the people. There are many people that refuse to vote nowadays because they believe that their vote does not matter, and in some cases, this argument is due to the presence of the electoral college. For example, if someone lives in a safe state and votes oppositely, than their vote does not usually cause a change because of the electoral college. In addition, the fact that a president can win an election without winning the popular vote goes against popular sovereignty. It is the right of the people in a democracy to determine who the president is and with the presence of an electoral college, it abandons the right of majoritism.

    [read less]

    The United States should not keep the electoral college the way that it is now because it takes voting out of the hands of the people. There are many …

    [read more]
    0
  • Jake from Kentucky

    The electoral college is a flawed institution, put into place by founders who believed in the elites holding power over the poor. As it is, the electoral college overwhelmingly favors states based on population, lowering the overall impact of voters in historically one-sided states such as California and Alabama. Because of a general lack of diversity in the side of the political spectrum most states swing towards, many refuse to vote purely on the belief that it won’t matter if they are in a state that favors an opposite political party. In addition to gaining more voters because of this, removing the electoral college could also help legitimize third party candidates who find it nearly impossible to win many states on their own. although this may be true if the electoral college is removed, there would still be fallout, as having accurate voting data would be even more important in an age where other countries meddling with data is at an all time high. Finally, this would prevent representatives from going off kilter and misrepresent their state by giving their vote to another party.

    [read less]

    The electoral college is a flawed institution, put into place by founders who believed in the elites holding power over the poor. As it is, the electo…

    [read more]
    0
  • Ethan from Kentucky

    I believe that they should get rid of the Electoral College because when there is such a big deal such as the the election of possibly a new president of the United States then they should look at who the majority of voters voted for. They shouldn’t have a sort of point system like what they have now because then it seems as if some states are going to be favored over others. It is not fair to the other candidate that if the majority of the population voted for them, but they didn’t win because they couldn’t win a swing state. There shouldn’t be swing states or safe states, there should just be people and what they vote for, the goal of the candidates is to try and get everyone’s vote.

    [read less]

    I believe that they should get rid of the Electoral College because when there is such a big deal such as the the election of possibly a new president…

    [read more]
    0
  • Kate from Kentucky

    I believe the different states should have more equal footing, rather than candidates focusing heavily on certain states. I also believe the majority vote should win (the Electoral College doesn’t have to choose the popular vote in some states), since the government is for the people. However, I can understand why some people would be for the Electoral College. Some might view it as a safety net to weed out the uneducated votes and it gives smaller states more power that they might not have otherwise. So, in the long run, I don’t think it should be destroyed but rather reformed.

    [read less]

    I believe the different states should have more equal footing, rather than candidates focusing heavily on certain states. I also believe the majority …

    [read more]
    0
  • maggie from Kentucky

    The Electoral College should be revoked from our current political traditions. I believe this change should happen due to the lack of voting currently happening in our country. Most people, especially young voters, believe that their vote does not matter. They see how the Electoral College has worked against the popular votes in the past. The popular vote should be the main reason why a candidate gets to rule our country. It’s hard to understand how our votes matter in our democracy when our voice gets override by the Electoral College.

    [read less]

    The Electoral College should be revoked from our current political traditions. I believe this change should happen due to the lack of voting currently…

    [read more]
    0
  • Jack from Kentucky

    Many political decisions are black and white in so much as their outcome harms one section of the population while helping another section of the population. Thus, the problem is less about choosing the correct political decision and more about choosing a succession of political decisions that average out to helping each person half of the time and harming each person half the time. Thus, I propose that, in order to ensure half and half representation, each election should alternate between college educated and less educated voters. Every 8 years, only college educated voters would get to elect the next president; every 8 years, less educated voters would get to elect a new president. I propose “college-educated” as the criteria because college-educated people are less likely to be whimsical not because they went to college, but because they are the sort of people either who poses the mentality and work ethic required to college or who were raised by parents who have this mentality and work ethic.

    [read less]

    Many political decisions are black and white in so much as their outcome harms one section of the population while helping another section of the popu…

    [read more]
    0
  • Ashley from Kentucky

    The electoral college should no longer exist. As our nation grows, populations in every state continues to rise and people are also moving to other states more often today. This makes the electoral voting unfair. People in California are not as represented as people in states such as Montana or other states with a smaller population. This could lead to an issue of people participating in voting, because they believe that there electoral college is so big, that their vote doesn’t matter.

    [read less]

    The electoral college should no longer exist. As our nation grows, populations in every state continues to rise and people are also moving to other st…

    [read more]
    0
  • Macy from Kentucky

    I believe that the Electoral College should not stay the same, because it is not fair that one person’s vote should have more representation than someone else. If 650,000 people are represented in California by one representative then their vote is receiving less representation than states like Kentucky where 575,000 citizens are represented by one. This needs to be changed because everyone’s vote deserves equal representation. All people should have just as much a say in who becomes the president as someone else.

    [read less]

    I believe that the Electoral College should not stay the same, because it is not fair that one person’s vote should have more representation than some…

    [read more]
    0
  • Donovan from Kentucky

    The electoral college gives a disproportionate amount of influence to the votes of those in smaller states. In addition, it allows a candidate to win the election despite losing the popular vote(such as the 2016 election). This means that not all voters have the same voting power, and the majority of the population isn’t always represented. Furthermore, the electoral college places too much importance of swing states. States that always vote for one party aren’t nearly as important in an election as swing states. Finally, in states which always vote one party, individual votes have less importance. For example, a democrat voting in Florida will have much more voting power than a democrat voting in Kentucky.

    [read less]

    The electoral college gives a disproportionate amount of influence to the votes of those in smaller states. In addition, it allows a candidate to win…

    [read more]
    0
  • Jackson from Kentucky

    I think that the electoral college is a broken system if the POTUS can win while having less than 50% of votes in a democracy. The majority should have power in theis cases. Growing up we are taught in childhood games and other activities that the majority vote should decide what we do. In childhood, it’s much simpler and makes sense to the common person but now for the presidential elections, it feels as though politicians add hoops to jump through to give them more power and make it harder for the average citizen to understand. If elections were simpler to understand like the childhood game we would play then more voters would turn up and feel as though they are being represented.

    [read less]

    I think that the electoral college is a broken system if the POTUS can win while having less than 50% of votes in a democracy. The majority should hav…

    [read more]
    0
  • Harrison from Kentucky

    The electoral college is completely outdated and the people’s voices are not being heard. Why does the United States not take into consideration the people’s popular vote. One representative in California represents about 650,000-700,000 voters. The numbers are too high and the popular vote of the people is not being heard. Our decisions should be based on what the Country wants and not whoever gets 270 votes first. Exterminating the electoral college would be a proper way of providing the US with the leaders they voted for.

    [read less]

    The electoral college is completely outdated and the people’s voices are not being heard. Why does the United States not take into consideration the p…

    [read more]
    0
  • K.C. from Indiana

    There are a lot of people whose votes are not counted. They should change it to make it more fair.

    0
  • Skye from Maryland

    Keeping the electoral vote promotes racism. Most of the larger states in the U.S. identify as Non-Hispanic white. Some states include Alaska, Colorado, and Montana. According to “governing.com,” in Alaska, 60.6% of the population is Caucasian. The state of Colorado is made up of 68.2% Non-Hispanic whites. Last but not least, the percentage of whites in Montana are 86.3%. According to “news.gallup.com,” 89% of republicans are Non-Hispanic whites. Due to these extreme ratios, the electoral votes are less racially diverse. And when diversity lacks, racism and prejudice come into play. If we’re a democracy with a popular voting system, why do we need an electoral vote when it only causes more complications?

    [read less]

    Keeping the electoral vote promotes racism. Most of the larger states in the U.S. identify as Non-Hispanic white. Some states include Alaska, Colorado…

    [read more]
    0
  • Callie from Missouri

    The electoral college’s decision is solely based on which states win, so in reality, the electoral college is unfair. It doesn’t allow the US citizens to decide who becomes president and just causes controversy. The amount of representatives for each state also makes it unfair due to large states, such as California, having way more representatives than ones such as Rhode Island.

    [read less]

    The electoral college’s decision is solely based on which states win, so in reality, the electoral college is unfair. It doesn’t allow the US citizens…

    [read more]
    0
  • Emilee from Tennessee

    The electoral college was introduced hundreds of years ago as a tool for the wealthy, educated minority to overturn the common will should the uneducated, “irresponsible” masses elect someone they deemed unfit to run the country. Even if this is no longer the intended purpose of the electoral college, our government should not represent a system that condones repressing any class of citizen lower than the wealthy, white elite. Furthermore, democracy is meant to depend on the will of the majority. The electoral college allowed gerrymandering and, as such, the manipulation of elections. A new system for the electoral college will allow for a truer democracy. So ask yourself: what do you think it means to be an American?

    [read less]

    The electoral college was introduced hundreds of years ago as a tool for the wealthy, educated minority to overturn the common will should the uneduca…

    [read more]
    0
  • Lazar from Massachusetts

    The reality of it is that we don’t need it anymore. We’re much more advanced at this point in time that it’s just a nuisance and gets in the way of really giving “the people” some sort of leverage. We need a change that’s coherent with this day and age. It needs to fit us as people and our future

    [read less]

    The reality of it is that we don’t need it anymore. We’re much more advanced at this point in time that it’s just a nuisance and gets in the way of re…

    [read more]
    0
  • Hannah from Michigan

    The Electoral College is completely outdated; it’s a system that follows the mindset of an elite men that made the Founding Fathers, who were hesitant to give the common people a vote pertaining to who chose the president due to a lack of education in the brand new country. Now, with a very strong and prominent central education system and new technologies, the people are much more educated and well informed. The Electoral College is outdated in today’s age, and should be at the very least amended to give more power to the people to make a direct vote on who controls their country.

    [read less]

    The Electoral College is completely outdated; it’s a system that follows the mindset of an elite men that made the Founding Fathers, who were hesita…

    [read more]
    0
  • Mushfiq from New York

    I think the idea of electoral voting system is kind of awkward because there is no direct system of democracy is shown by the system. The voting system should be by direct democracy. Thus the system would be more accurate.

    [read less]

    I think the idea of electoral voting system is kind of awkward because there is no direct system of democracy is shown by the system. The voting syste…

    [read more]
    0
  • Shelby from Colorado

    The electoral college was created to prevent people in rural areas from being overrun by the masses, but in actuality it simply degrades the importance of voters’ opinions and places the final decision on presidential elections in the hands of the body of electors (who aren’t always trustworthy or objective).

    [read less]

    The electoral college was created to prevent people in rural areas from being overrun by the masses, but in actuality it simply degrades the importanc…

    [read more]
    0
  • Katie from Florida

    The electoral college is an outdated system that was implemented because the founding fathers thought that people were both too stupid to vote, as well as the fact that a direct democracy would take to long. The current argument against abolishing the electoral college makes no sense — currently, it helps larger states win and smaller states do not matter. Therefore, by abolishing the electoral college, everybody’s individual vote matters in the long run. Lastly, the electorates can vote against the public belief. Therefore, it is almost entirely inaccurate and a system that is made for failure. Overall, there is no valid reason for the electoral college to be in place—and if it should be kept in place, the electorates should be computerized, NOT real people—as people can change their vote and are inherently flawed.

    [read less]

    The electoral college is an outdated system that was implemented because the founding fathers thought that people were both too stupid to vote, as wel…

    [read more]
    0